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HardyG

Garage Floor Puddle Problem: What to Do?

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Ganstas,

 

I have a problem with my garage floor and was wondering if somebody could chime in with advice. The rocket scientists that poured the floor managed to slope it TOWARDS the living space, AWAY from the driveway and there is a big depression in the concrete. While I do not get rainwater infiltration, whenever I drive in with snow on the car it plops on the floor, melts, and I soon have a big indoor puddle. I have toyed with the idea of some form of floor leveleing cement, or, taking a concrete saw and cutting a progressively-sloping slit that runs outside. Aside from jackhammering the whole flipping thing out, is there another solution? Can you put topping over the original floor and slope it? Me stuck. Thanks!

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I have a similar problem in my screen porch. It looks like they were short on the pour by juuuuuuuust enough and I get a little skim puddle. Pisses me off.

 

I've heard of a product called gypcrete that's made to level floors and in radiant situations, but don't know if it would work in this application.

 

I do feel your pain, however. It's an irritant.

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You might have to etch the floor with some type of acid,and use a self leveling concrete to solve your problem,whenever my contractors pour my garage floors instead of quarter inch per ft slope I make them go a half inch per ft slope,matt

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put a small fan blowing across the floor, it will evaporate the water faster..cwm40.gif

 

i don't think any thin leveling cement would hold up to a car driving over it..frown.gif

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View PostGanstas,

 

I have a problem with my garage floor and was wondering if somebody could chime in with advice. The rocket scientists that poured the floor managed to slope it TOWARDS the living space, AWAY from the driveway and there is a big depression in the concrete. While I do not get rainwater infiltration, whenever I drive in with snow on the car it plops on the floor, melts, and I soon have a big indoor puddle. I have toyed with the idea of some form of floor leveleing cement, or, taking a concrete saw and cutting a progressively-sloping slit that runs outside. Aside from jackhammering the whole flipping thing out, is there another solution? Can you put topping over the original floor and slope it? Me stuck. Thanks!

 

I think you would find that if you cut a slit it would just fill up with crud in no time and not do the job.

 

You could use some sort of leveling mix but it sounds like it's a large area that would need to be filled and sloped to the doors, most leveling products are not made to be applied very thick, you could end up with more of a mess.

 

The first thing I would do is check the entire garage with a transit and see exactly what has to be done to get the slope you need, I think when you calculate it out you'll probably find you need a lot more material than you think, a yard of material doesn't go very far when you spread it out.

 

If you have the room code wise and the old floor is sound, you could pour another floor right over the top of what you have, you would need to raise things 2 " minimum in the thinnest area to get a decent job.

 

The best of course would be to remove what you have and pour a new one. I know what Matt is saying about 1/2 per ft. better safe than sorry, but that gives you a 12" slope in an average 24' garage and to my eye it starts to look a little off. A good concrete contractor can do 1/4 per ft and make it work.

 

That's really the problem, many residential guys that do flatwork simply aren't that good, some of the commercial guys are artists with concrete, it's alot harder than it looks.

 

When I get a job to build a garage I still do my own floor. Your complaint is one of the most common problems people have. You can do a beautiful job on everything else but if someone gets out of the car in there brand new garage and steps in a puddle there going to be pissed.

 

I still set up keyed screeds and strike them off with a 2x4, it takes more time but it's worth it to me.

Some guys can do it by snapping a line around the perimeter of the garage with the proper slope, carefully troweling a pad of concrete to the line, making another pad in the middle with a matching slope, and then filling between while they strike it off with a power screed, these guys have

talent.

 

Or you could buy a squeegee. smile.gif

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If you have that much water, I'd probably consider cutting a circular hole in the floor and installing a drain, along the lines of a french drain. Throw a grate on top. Relatively simple to do and they get the job done just fine.

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Whats under the garage? Is it just the foundation and is it backfilled? If it is drill a hole right though the concrete in the center of the puddle. Problem solved.

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View PostI think in MA. it's against the code to have a floor drain in a garage, something about leaking oil or gas getting into the ground.headscratch.gif

 

I could be wrong my code book is a little old.redface.gif

 

 

I'm not saying you're wrong, but that sounds stupid. Cars drip all over the place and the stuff runs off into the ecosystem. Maybe the cars in MA use maxi-padswink.gif

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View PostI'm not saying you're wrong, but that sounds stupid. Cars drip all over the place and the stuff runs off into the ecosystem. Maybe the cars in MA use maxi-padswink.gif

 

I ain't saying it's right, I just think it might be code.

 

This is Ma., Things don't always make scene here. redface.gif

 

Could be I'm wrong, happens alot. beatin.gif

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View PostI think in MA. it's against the code to have a floor drain in a garage, something about leaking oil or gas getting into the ground.headscratch.gif

 

I could be wrong my code book is a little old.redface.gif

 

 

You're probably right about the code implications, but Derrick's solution would definitely do the job. I've got a dehumidifier in my basement & rather than dealing with emptying the bucket, I just busted out the slab in an inconspicuous spot & piped the water there. It's very little water, so it's no big deal. You could core-drill a hole thru the slab, remove as much sand/fill as you can & throw some gravel in there. I'm sure you could find a flush grate somewhere that will fit the hole diameter. If you ever sell the house, just patch it with some concrete.

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My solution for a one car garage;

 

Self leveling pourable concrete will work here, but you got to do something.

 

What you need to accomplish is to get the water to run out under the door.

 

To do that the floor elevation has to be raised at the front of the garage and a slope somewhere between 1/4"-1/8" per foot towards the door. To do that you will have to build some tapered forms. For strength of this poured floor, at the door the poured floor needs to be a 1/4" thick. From there the elevation increases 1/4"-1/8" per foot until you get to the back or the garage.

 

If you build the tapering form correctly, a straight-edge screed can be used to get this concrete level with the tapered form boards, sloping to the door.

 

Etching the existing concrete floor is a good idea. They also make a bonding agent that is painted onto the floor. In the self-leveling concrete there are additives to increase strength, and bonding.

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