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Why can't you just buy bearings off the shelf?

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My local bearing distributor says he gets inquiries all the time for reel bearings but they are not the same size as what he carries-for $5. Maybe only a fraction in difference but not the same. Do reel manufacturers do this so they can charge $25 for a bearing?

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View PostMy local bearing distributor says he gets inquiries all the time for reel bearings but they are not the same size as what he carries-for $5. Maybe only a fraction in difference but not the same. Do reel manufacturers do this so they can charge $25 for a bearing?

 

there a bearing for every application..i just picked up 10 bearings for a van staal sealed and unseald..if the number is the same or cross references to a different manufacturer its the same

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From what I know, reel manufacturers do not make their own bearings . . it is a very specialized and precise process. Reels are designed and engineered to utilize normal sized bearings. If you have problems with purchasing bearings from your reel repair source or directly from the reel manufacturer - due to cost, etc . . . then instead buy them directly from bearing manufacturers/distributors.

 

Go online, there are plenty of hobby sites selling bearings for all sorts of applications. Some even mention specific reel applications in their catalogs.

 

If the bearing you are looking to replace does not have a number on it - then borrow a caliper from someone and carefully measure the thickness, width and bore of the bearing.

 

Online suppliers cross reference their bearings by dimension (usually expressed as millimeters) as well as model number and application - such as Radial, thrust, etc.

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View PostFrom what I know, reel manufacturers do not make their own bearings . . it is a very specialized and precise process. Reels are designed and engineered to utilize normal sized bearings. If you have problems with purchasing bearings from your reel repair source or directly from the reel manufacturer - due to cost, etc . . . then instead buy them directly from bearing manufacturers/distributors.

 

Go online, there are plenty of hobby sites selling bearings for all sorts of applications. Some even mention specific reel applications in their catalogs.

 

If the bearing you are looking to replace does not have a number on it - then borrow a caliper from someone and carefully measure the thickness, width and bore of the bearing.

 

Online suppliers cross reference their bearings by dimension (usually expressed as millimeters) as well as model number and application - such as Radial, thrust, etc.

 

 

You are absolutely right, no reel mfg. makes their bearings- bearing manufacturers make bearings and reel mfgs just design their reels to accept these particular commercial bearings. ALL bearings in reels should be available at any reputable bearing distributor- either giving them the number etched on the bearing or taking measurements like he said here to cross reference it. I'm not saying it's impossible for a reel manufacturer to spec out their own "special" bearing for a particular reel, but I'd say it's very unlikely because that's just going to drive up their price having "special" bearings made rather than "off the shelf" cheaper ones. Just take your bearing to a local distributor and they should be able to help you. If you know a good number go a google search you can buy them online at about a million website for reasonable prices. A lot of times the reel mfgs. actually sell replacement bearings for their reels at pretty reasonable prices because they buy them in bulk so it's not crazy to check with your reel mfg. first it might surprise you.

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Boca bearings has a cross reference chart in its various sections: including reels. Bearings have a series of tolerance identifiers, from a scale of 1 to 9.

Many reels use a 3. the acronym used is ABEC. So bearings are called ABEC1, ABEC3, ABEC5, ABEC7, ABEC9. Then are the latest ceramic hybrid bearings, or full ceramic.

abec=annular bearing engineering committee.

A fast search in the tech specs of any bearing site will show the tolerance differances between the ABEC designations.

Miniature bearings are mostly metric, in whole millimeters, with boundary dimensions always expressed by bore, OD, and finally width.

Fractional inch bearings have a different way of identification, usually preceded by an R. Visit VXB dot com, and explore the inch style brgs.

 

Any time a bearing changes hands, the price goes up. Stainless bearings are more than high chrome ones. Ceramic ones are through the roof.

ABEC1's are very inexpensive, while the 9's will compete witht he ceramics for cost.

 

Hope this helps. KD

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