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Favorite cookbooks?

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What are some of your favorite cookbooks? I have two I use a lot but would like to expand. I enjoy useful cookbooks that present recipes that an ordinary home cook can make with stuff that's in the pantry. Any suggestions? The two I use the most are:

 

1. The New Joy of Cooking -- The updated classic. A really useful tool for the home cook.

2. Best Recipe -- From the people at Cook's Illustrated. I love the fact that they explain what works, what doesn't and why.

 

I pulled Larousse Gastronomique off my shelf (it was a wedding present) the other night. I rarely use it, but its a lot of fun to read. However, the recipes seem to assume a level of competence that I don't really have.

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Mine is the joy of cooking as well. I hold onto my cooks illustrated magazines and have their binder cookbook deal and will refer to that from time to time. Beyond that, if you can find a copy of Dom Delouise "Eat this, it will make you feel better," you should get it. It's got a couple of recipes I use from time to time, but the stories are what make it great.

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Julia Child's "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" is indespensible.

 

Have a bunch of others, but the only other ones I refer to regularly are all of Jeff Smith's books (have them all). Just too much easier access to stuff on the web these days than having to search thru a myraid of cookbooks.

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Joy of cooking! It is the tool. You need that "basic" how to as much as the other stuff. Ya know, if you can make a Bechamel sauce correctly, you can make lots of other things without a recipe.

 

I have 2 sentimental faves.

Craig Claiborne's Memorable Meals

 

Prudhomme Family Cookbook-If you like Cajun/Creole this is a must have. Its the REAL food and not the commercial hype (ironically the hype started by Prudhomme)

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Marcella Hazan, 'Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking.' She is the Italian Julia Child. Worth the price for the Bolognese recipe alone. Great fish and seafood recipies including my all-time favorite way to prepare Bluefish. Everytime I make it I think to myself that I need to post it here...but then get lazy. Next time....

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i have way too many ccokbooks

 

some i just make one or two things out of

 

Joy of Cooking is my go to for basic knowledge

 

LL Beans Maine Cook Book for down east dishes

 

the frugal gourmet:

three ancient cuisines

our immigrant ancestors

full of good stuff

 

silver pallet (entrees)

more silver pallet

martha stewart (ice cream and tarts)

daisy cooks! (puerto rican food)

 

the breakfast book (dry fruit cream scones.....yum!)

 

many more

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Joy of Cooking is a good hard copy. . . BUT

 

INTERNET!

Best resource out there, unlimited resources and recipes. You can google anything and youtube it to see it being done. The internet is the most valuable resource for cooking and its FREE.

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View PostJoy of Cooking is a good hard copy. . . BUT

 

INTERNET!

Best resource out there, unlimited resources and recipes. You can google anything and youtube it to see it being done. The internet is the most valuable resource for cooking and its FREE.

 

 

 

Yup, I second that. All Recipes is one of my favorites.

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View PostYup, I second that. All Recipes is one of my favorites.

 

 

Recipezaar is an awesome site too.

 

But in terms of "books", definately Joy of Cooking, and the Frugal Gourmet series.

 

The Better Homes and Gardens one is pretty good as well. It has been a long standing classic.

 

Another great series is the "365 Ways to..." series.

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Internet recipes. Oy vey.

Ya know what,I was in the bookstore the other day waiting for my truck to get some tires (don't get me started) and went into cookbookland. I got to looking. The act of a person sitting down and compiling a group of recipes into a book creates something of a theme. I kinda miss that with the net.

I vowed to pull out my cookbooks more and peruse them instead of running to Google so much (what does google give you? cooks.com than recipezaar).

 

Example-Paula Deen. She is into expolitation overload now. Every recipe on Food Network that is rednecky gets tacked onto her, but her original cookbook from before her tv debut (The Lady and Sons) is great. Wonderful food, the things I grew up eating.

 

Forgot about Jeff Smith, I have immigrant ancestors too!

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View PostInternet recipes. Oy vey.

Ya know what,I was in the bookstore the other day waiting for my truck to get some tires (don't get me started) and went into cookbookland. I got to looking. The act of a person sitting down and compiling a group of recipes into a book creates something of a theme. I kinda miss that with the net.

I vowed to pull out my cookbooks more and peruse them instead of running to Google so much (what does google give you? cooks.com than recipezaar).

 

Example-Paula Deen. She is into expolitation overload now. Every recipe on Food Network that is rednecky gets tacked onto her, but her original cookbook from before her tv debut (The Lady and Sons) is great. Wonderful food, the things I grew up eating.

 

Forgot about Jeff Smith, I have immigrant ancestors too!

 

 

I kind of feel the same way about recipes on the web. I just enjoy cookbooks and like having something handy I can grab off the shelf and peruse. The web is good if you're looking to pinpoint something, though. Anyway, thanks for all the suggestions guys.

 

Johnwade, I've heard that about Paula Deen's book, but have been dubious because of her TV schtick (e.g. "first you take some butter, then add some butter, saute it in butter, then smother it with butter and cover with cheese. Bake for one hour at 350."). I'll check it out next time I'm in the bookstore.

 

Also, great suggestions on the Julia Child classic, which I am embarassed to say I don't own. And the Craig Clairborne book, which I also do not have but am familiar with because my mom, who is a fantastic cook, relied on it for years. Anybody ever use any of Mark Bittman's books? He is sort of annoying on TV, but I've always enjoyed his column in the Times.

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View PostMarcella Hazan, 'Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking.'

 

Someone on this very board was kind enough to get me this book. Excellent.

 

Her son also has a very good book - The Classic Pasta Cookbook which is very good.

 

The Frugal Gourmet has some good ones.

 

The Essential Cook Book has a great section on ingredients. (Purchase and Preparation). 200 pages+. Equipment (another 40-50 page). And then some decent recipes.

 

Italian Family Cooking has some good stuff.

 

Justin Wilson has some real good ones.

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i go to escoffier more than anything else. its a pain to decypher, but its the classic book for all things french. i've also recently fallen in love with joel robuchon's new cookbook. and my le grande livre of alain ducasse is a totally over-the-top book that has nearly no use for the home cook, but its totally like food porn.

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