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Crabs in the stomach of bass

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how much does the digestion rate effect the idea that stripers eat crabs/lobsters etc in comparison to other fish, worms, squid etc..

 

 

I have heard and read folks say that stripers eat more crabs etc then actual squid and fish..I wonder how much of that is the very different digestion rates...

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View PostI can't imagine it would take a bass any longer to digest the shell on a crab as opposed to the bones of larger baitfish.

 

no? could they pass the bones though?

 

I never keep fish, but the thought jumped into my head this weekend...must have been a mix of discussions had, the stomach contents thread and a book I am reading...

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View PostI can't imagine it would take a bass any longer to digest the shell on a crab as opposed to the bones of larger baitfish.

 

Squid, certainly digest faster, but bones vs a carapace? I'm thinking not so much of difference. Particularly when that fish has protecting scales. usually things in the fore gut are fairly recognizable

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Over in the UK 'peeler crab' are a very highly sought after bait.

 

I don't kill many Bass but in those we do, there is almost always crab of some sort.

 

Not sure on the digestion rates and whether or not they are only eating crab as a form of food but...

 

In Bass without crab in the gut we'll often find stones or small shellfish.

 

Makes me wonder whether its deliberate ballast.

 

Going back to the 'peeler'. Guys spend ages looking for the 'right' crab, peel it, wrap it up nicely etc and chuck it all out. many guys swear by it and it IS very effective.

However, 'peeler' is invariably buried and not available to bass in large numbers. Personally, i don't subscribe to Bass only eat peelers. I have never witnessed Bass rooting around checking to see if its dinner is peeling before smashing the living daylights out of it.

We just freeline hard crabs and do just fine..

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Crabs that are shedding their shells have a different smell...it definitely makes a difference.

 

I don't think that because more people are finding crabs in the guts has much to do with digestion times. I believe bass spend more time on the bottom and root around for bottom critters more than anything else.

 

I've never seen it first hand but heard bass will eat sponge to get at the millions of little critters an animals living within the cavitities of the sponge...snag a peice on the bottom an hold it up to the light...it's freaky how much life is on a tiny peice.

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View Posthow much does the digestion rate effect the idea that stripers eat crabs/lobsters etc in comparison to other fish, worms, squid etc..

 

 

I have heard and read folks say that stripers eat more crabs etc then actual squid and fish..I wonder how much of that is the very different digestion rates...

 

As far as I understand bass have grinders in their throats that allow them to pulverize hard sharp matter such as clam and crab shells. They also use very little energy to chase food a lot of the time, just laying on the bottom and waiting for a nice meal to present itself or get washed close to/into their mouths. Crustaceans would fit into the ladder category as much as clams I think.

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it might also be an availability thing. they will hound squid if given the chance but those suckers move fast. calicos, no commercial harvest. nobody is harrassing these things, they are literally everywhere and super plentiful in the surf zone before during and after a shed in all but the worst surf. put on a snorkel & mask and spend an hour poking around one day when you take the kids to the beach.

 

do bass digest bones or just pass them? headscratch.gif

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View PostAs far as I understand bass have grinders in their throats that allow them to pulverize hard sharp matter such as clam and crab shells.

 

 

9 out of 10 crabs inside the bass ive filleted are intact, usually whole and undamaged headscratch.gif i think they just horf things

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View Post9 out of 10 crabs inside the bass ive filleted are intact, usually whole and undamaged headscratch.gif i think they just horf things

 

I said "as far as I understand". Apparently that's not very far. redface.gif

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View Post9 out of 10 crabs inside the bass ive filleted are intact, usually whole and undamaged headscratch.gif i think they just horf things

 

 

Yep...i am not sure what purpose those crushers have...apparently not to crush food. I've always thought it was a rough spot to keep the slimy critters at bay and to aid in swallowing em down the throat...

 

Blackfish on the other hand...

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I believe that those plates in the back of their throats are not for crushing, but for holding food items in place that are too big to swallow in one gulp.

 

If you have ever reached in their mouth to try and get a deep hook out you will find that your fingers/hand go in without much resistance, but get all scraped up when you take your hand back out. There are little "teeth" all over those plates and they are angled backwards. Many predatory animals have teeth that are angled backwards for the same reason.

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View PostI believe that those plates in the back of their throats are not for crushing, but for holding food items in place that are too big to swallow in one gulp.

 

If you have ever reached in their mouth to try and get a deep hook out you will find that your fingers/hand go in without much resistance, but get all scraped up when you take your hand back out. There are little "teeth" all over those plates and they are angled backwards. Many predatory animals have teeth that are angled backwards for the same reason.

 

 

i think your correct.

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