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Are Mantis Shrimp native to the NOrtheast ?

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I've read alot about finding them in a Bass' stomach contents, but I've neither seen them in the water nor head about them in any fishing (bait) reports. In fact, I've never heard others talk about catching them or using them for bait for any other species.

 

Where exactly are they found ?

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supposedly they are common in NJ bays, raritan especially from what i understand.

 

I don't know if they can be easily gathered, which may be why we don't hear about them for bait.

 

I have heard they are actually dangerous to handle while alive, that could be another reason.

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I would not have thought so - However, given the amount of photos I've seen of these being cleaned from striped bass, I would venture to say they have at least some level of population up here.

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Yes, they're native here. They are aggressive little predators; the Bahamian variety is locally known as a "toe-popper," since they'll split the toe of any careless wader wide open. The strike of their claw is one of the fastest movements in the animal kingdom, about 30 meters per second over a distance of a couple of inches. And they are good to eat, according to A.J. McClane. Many years ago i saw them in sushi bars, sold as "squilla," though they seem to have disappeared from that market. They have compound vision and see polarized light.

 

I've had 8-inch mantis shrimp come up on fluke baits in Long Island Sound. If I could locate a colony, I'd try and catch them - but NEVER put fingers within reach of the business end.

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Common name: Sea Scorpion

Functional type: Spearer

Range: Maine to Surinam

Habitat: Mud

Depth: Low intertidal to 150 m; usually less than 40 m

Home: U-shaped burrow

Diet: Shrimp, small crabs, small fish

Size: 2-18 cm

Color: Brown; yellow and black uropods; black patch on second abdominal tergite, eyes iridescent green

Distinguishing Characters: Raptorial dactyl with six teeth

Activity: Nocturnal

Aquarium Requirements: Temperature: 18-26° C

Salinity: 33-36 PSU

Cohabitants: Will eat shrimp and small fish

Aquarium size (adult): 80 l

Aquarium substrate: Mud to burrow in or pvc pipe

Suitability for Aquarium: Difficult to keep due to burrow requirements; temperature

Availability: Sold commercially by some collectors and biological supply companies; easy to collect on mudflats at very low tide; commonly taken in shrimp trawls

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do know what these creatures are, and I sure wish I knew where I could get some because these things are delicious. They are mantis shrimp, Squilla empusa, a burrowing shrimp that occurs in muddy bottoms from Cape Cod to the Gulf of Mexico. As far as I know, they are impossible to find commercially available, despite their delectability. The few that I have eaten, never enough for a full meal, I found in the wrack and seaweed blown by a strong onshore gale of wind. I remember that the aftermath of one such gale on a south-facing beach here on Cape Cod gave me two lobsters, a half-dozen blue crabs, three mantis shrimp and a peck of bay scallops, all gathered before breakfast. It is first-come, first-served after these storms, you must beat the gulls to get the scallops.

Be careful if you come upon live mantis shrimp because their forelimbs are strong and sharp and can deliver a very painful cut. These limbs are much like the limbs of the insect after which it is named, the praying mantis, and they have the shared purpose of capturing prey. The mantis shrimp has two sharp spines on its tail that can make nasty puncture wounds when it reflexively snaps its tail as it tries to escape; if you are not careful, the shrimp will wound you repeatedly in its frantic efforts.

The shrimp you found in your bass looked good enough to eat; I might have tried them. It would be great to have a bass trained to gather them for you. The Chinese have used cormorants for fishing, South Pacific Islanders have used tethered remoras to glom onto sea turtles, so why not a fish to gather mantis shrimp? I think I'm getting soft.

 

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Great info. I'm curious b/c I've heard more and seen more photos of them in "stomcah content" threads than I have in fishing reports or talked about in Bait and Tackle shops or amongst fishermen that I know.

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View PostI've read alot about finding them in a Bass' stomach contents, but I've neither seen them in the water nor head about them in any fishing (bait) reports. In fact, I've never heard others talk about catching them or using them for bait for any other species.

 

Where exactly are they found ?

 

 

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I have never seen one live,but have good second hand info .They have been reported behind barnegat inlet Oyster creek,point canal and the upper barnegat.Seems different species are found all over the world,and they are edible.

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