Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GScott

Chesapeake Planers

Rate this topic

11 posts in this topic

Well I tried asking this same question on an "Offshore Fishing" site and the offshore guys don't seem to know the answer so maybe it's a Bay question.

Why are the planer boards that are so popular on the Chesapeake not used offshore?

I read all the time, from the offshore guys, that it's important to really spread out your trolling spread yet they fish out riggers that, at best, only spread their lines out 45' (?) where as the Chesapeake style planers spread your lines out over 100', to maybe 200', depending on your rig.

Obviously they would have to troll fewer lines offshore at one time than we do while trolling the bay.

As advantageous as it is to cover a lot more water, I figure there must be a good reason they don't use them.

Will the planers not track in heavier offshore seas?

Does it have more to do with the trolling speeds offshore?

Maybe there's no reason and it just never caught on. Maybe just a regional thing?

 

GScott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...maybe it has to do with the different types vessels being used in the different locations?

 

Inshore = small boats w/o outriggers to spread the baits/lures. So they use the PBs.

 

Offshore = big boats w/ outriggers to spread the baits/lures. So they don't use the PBs.

 

And planer boards are cheaper and easier to use on a small boat that would be used in a bay.

 

JM $.02

 

Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View Post

Obviously they would have to troll fewer lines offshore at one time than we do while trolling the bay.

 

As advantageous as it is to cover a lot more water, I figure there must be a good reason they don't use them.

 

I'm stumped by this part - why would they "obviously" have to troll fewer line offshore than you have to in the bay?

 

 

One thing people that don't have much experience offshore trolling don't realize is, your goal isn't to try and disassociate your lures from the boat - the boat is what brings up offshore fish. They see/feel the disturbance of the boat...it attracts them, makes them curious, draws them close enough so they see the lure spread.

 

 

In the bay, why would you need to troll more than 2 lures? You aren't simulating a school of baitfish - a couple bunker spoons or umbrella rigs dragged over a school of bass is less hassle and just as effective as dragging a dozen lures over the same school of bass.

 

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thoughts are;

 

Offshore the wave troughs are deeper and the wave tops higher than found on a normal day in the bay. PB's lines would dig into a wave when the boat is in the bottom of a trough. That would change angles, put alot of strain on the PB line, possibly pop the trolled lines from their clips.

 

When a larger fish is caught, the boat tries to catch up to and get a better angle on the fish. With planer boards deployed, they would have to be brought in before the boat could maneuver to it's advantage.

 

Could a boat pulling PB's back down, to the fish?

 

When a boat needs to change it's speed and turn sharply to get an advantage on the fish what happens to the planer lines and boards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some guys do use planers but to get down deep deep and others just prefer a downrigger. Spreading out you lures offshore is done with your outriggers....And even then how spread our your lures are is up to preference.

 

I know for us we actually try to keep the lures/baits pretty tight to one another in certain patterns depending on what we're after. About the only time we drop our baits far away from the boat is when trying to get bites from picky/spooked bluefin tuna. That's about it.

 

TimS is right, Your boat is your biggest/best teaser you have offshore.

 

BTW, The reason they troll so many lines down there for stripers is because its all about putting the meat in the box and limiting out. I won't even call that fishing IMO.... 12 rods on way too heavy rod/reel combos. The fish hooks itself and the paying customers reels the fish in. The fish has no chance in hell....It's great for the guys who go on these trips to stuff the freezer full of meat but it's not very sporting targeting these fish like that....

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are my thoughts....

 

1) Effective us of the large planerboards (standard double board model) requires setting up the proper equipment on your boat, such as planerboard mast. You can use a T-top or cabin roof, if you have one, but you need atleast the reels and sturdy cage. You could throw them of off boat cleats, but then you have to bring them in by hand ( a pain) and you won't get them as far away from the boat.

2) In the bay when trolling for stripers you generally don't go as fast as the offshore guys who could be goin 5-8 knots+. Planers at this speed will pull very hard on your planer setup and will test your setup's strength. It is possible the boards could start porposing through waves as well causing it to tumble and tangle. High speeds and heavy baits also means your line holders have to be very tight, so you will test the line and the holder as well.

3) If you need to quickly backdown or follow a large fish after a hookup then you would need to pull the planer board and any other lines on the boards in as quickly as possible to avoid a massive CF. This can burn precious minutes dealin with reeling in the board and the assocaited lines.

4) Offshore guys are leary of this system, it too a long time for boards to come to the great lakes, and it took even longer for boards to make it to the east coast/the bay.

5) Lastly has to with presentation, if you are running skirts/baits or spreaders on the surface and want that skipping action, then you need to have your lines up high in the air to create a high angle in the line. Outriggers do this and planers won't. Planers would be very effective for plugs and deeper running baits though.

 

I do think they have a place offshore, I think we will see experimentation in the future and people using them....but to what extent is unkown. I think a lot of offshore guys are stuck in their ways as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and especially to Mitchman for the in depth answer.

Tim, I didn't mean to say that the Bay guys have to troll so many lines.

I meant that I don't figure the Offshore guys cold troll that many, even if they wanted to. I expect a big tuna or marlin could make one heck of a mess of one of the Bay guys' 30 rod spreads.

 

Thanks,

GScott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When offshore we normally troll 7 lines but it wouldn't be a problem to run 9 and this is on a center console. On some of the bigger boats guys run 12 or more lines off their boat. Outriggers get the job done and because you can angle them up or down they would be a lot more versatile than a planer board setup.... We only run 7 because while tuna fishing its very possible to get multiple hookups and for the crew size we run and space on the boat we would be in trouble if any more than 4-5 tuna were on at once....Hell 3 can be a fiasco...

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The planer boards are very helpful in the Chesapeake in the spring time, reason being that most of the fish are near the surface. Since the warmer water is near the surface most fish will be in the top 15-20 feet of water. With the planer boards you move the lures away from the boat so you now have lures in the water away from the boat which will spook these shallow fish. Sometimes it makes a very big difference on whether you catch fish or not.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.