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In Search of the Ultimate Meatball.

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Hey Guys:

 

What Ratio of Beef/Pork/Veal do you consider optimum???

 

I have made em with all beef....they tend to be stiff.

 

I made em with all veal...Delicious, with a nice soft texture, but they are a pain to fry because they are so soft. Great leftovers the next day. So Far my best tasting Meatball.

 

Made em with all pork...also delicious, but they tend to shrink.

 

Don't want to buy the Beef/Pork/Veal Meatloaf Mix at Shoprite...would prefer to blend my own. I have tried this stuff in the past and It still wasn't what I wanted. Likely too much Beef as it would be the lowest cost ingredient.

 

I would be fine purchasing specific cuts and grinding it myself in the Cuisinart.

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i make mine with all beef, like my mother make 'em. if you put a lot of breadcrumbs and just enough egg to bind it all together, it won't be stiff at all,

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I use the store bought meat loaf mix...about 2.5 pounds. If they package it in three seperate groups, it appears to be about equal portions per package of beef, veal and pork.

 

FWIW, like I said, 2 and half pounds, and my filler binder is 3 or 4 eggs, 2 cups fresh breadcrumbs and a cup of milk, plus seasonings. They are never dry or stiff.

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I don't know what kind of texture you get with a Cuisinart, might be why beef is stiff. A Kitchen Aid attachment does a good job.

 

Best results has been ground chuck roast, including most of the fat. We often mix in up to about 1/3 lamb shoulder, veal shoulder or pork and flavor changes but texture stays about the same. I'll remove most of the fat from these. If using round instead of chuck addition of pork or veal will give you the additional fat it usually needs.

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Jim:

 

Cuisinart would be used just for meat grinding. You are correct that If you grind too fine you get Pate'/Forcemeat.

 

 

I mix em by hand once they are together. It could be the beef I use...90% Lean, not enough Fat. I like the Lamb Idea.

 

My Recipe is Pretty simple

 

1 1/4 Lbs Veal

 

2 tablespons chopped Onion

 

2 Cloves Garlic Minced

 

3 Tablespoons Chopped PArsely

 

3 Tablespoons Parminganio Reggianno

 

1 slice white bread, crust cutoff, soaked in 1/3 cup scalded milk.

 

Touch of Nutmeg.

 

Mix gently by hand, roll into balls, roll in plain breadcrumb, fry in Olive Oil, drain oil add crushed tomatoes to deglaze pan, return meatballs and cook covered for 25 minutes.

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View PostDon't use bread crumbs. Their too fine. Use very small pieces of Italian bread soaked in water and squeezed out.

 

 

 

i agree

 

store bought bread crumbs are never found in my house

 

i either make my own from day old bread, or soak stale bread in milk and then squeeze it into the meatball mix

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View PostJim:

 

Cuisinart would be used just for meat grinding. You are correct that If you grind too fine you get Pate'/Forcemeat.

 

 

I mix em by hand once they are together. It could be the beef I use...90% Lean, not enough Fat. I like the Lamb Idea.

 

My Recipe is Pretty simple

 

1 1/4 Lbs Veal

 

2 tablespons chopped Onion

 

2 Cloves Garlic Minced

 

3 Tablespoons Chopped PArsely

 

3 Tablespoons Parminganio Reggianno

 

1 slice white bread, crust cutoff, soaked in 1/3 cup scalded milk.

 

Touch of Nutmeg.

 

Mix gently by hand, roll into balls, roll in plain breadcrumb, fry in Olive Oil, drain oil add crushed tomatoes to deglaze pan, return meatballs and cook covered for 25 minutes.

 

 

 

except for the meat, this closely resembles the meatball recipe i tried most recently

 

i did add s&P, and i tend to be more generous with cheese and garlic

 

i also add a little heat- cholula hot sauce for stuff like this

 

but the steps of:

rolling in bread rumbs and frying, followed by simmering in a can of tomatoes before adding them to the sauce, resulting in the best meatballs i have ever made

 

i didn't like them the day i made them, but the next day it was obvious they were the best i ever managed to make

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View Postexcept for the meat, this closely resembles the meatball recipe i tried most recently

 

i did add s&P, and i tend to be more generous with cheese and garlic

 

i also add a little heat- cholula hot sauce for stuff like this

 

but the steps of:

rolling in bread rumbs and frying, followed by simmering in a can of tomatoes before adding them to the sauce, resulting in the best meatballs i have ever made

 

i didn't like them the day i made them, but the next day it was obvious they were the best i ever managed to make

 

 

 

I think they're always better the next day.

 

To that recipe (except the meat and minus the hot sauce) we usually add a couple Tsp of toasted pinenuts and hydrated golden raisins or currants. I was ridiculed a little for that but makes some mighty fine meatballs.

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What makes meat tough is letting it get too warm, too many eggs, and overworking the meat while mixing ingredients or forming the meatballs.

 

 

My recipe is w Plainville brand DARK ground turkey meat. This is far superior to the supermarket brands, and makes a better meatball than the PVille white ground turkey. The dark is 7% fat and the white is about 1%.

 

 

1lb Plainville Dark ground turkey meat

 

1/2 med onion diced fine

 

big handful of chopped Italian parsley

 

some dry breadcrumbs maybe 1/2 cup or so

 

some freshly grated parm goes in

 

whatever seasoning if you used plain breadcrumbs, s+p

 

garlic, optional

 

no egg at all, but 1 is plenty if you have to.

 

These are soft so they "squat" if you brown them before adding them to the sauce. I just put right into the sauce and gently simmer to save another mess and pan.

 

I think the dry breadcrumbs absorbs the liquids from the meat as they cook keeping the juices inside. The addition of the onions and parsley also provides moisture, flavor, and texture.

 

My wife doesn't eat beef, pork, or veal, but even if she did I don't think I would stop using the turkey.

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