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winter battery storage

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MikeMc

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last 2 years, I left the batteries on my boat all winter. This year, I thought I'd store them in the shed. Does it matter? In the shed, I can at least charge them every month, should I remember. redface.gif

You know it must be a penguin bound down if you hear that terrible screaming and there ain't no other birds around. 

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I take mine out. Its better for a battery to be kept charged - though the self discharge rate is slower in cold weather. The other reason I like to take them out is if anything happens to the battery over the winter - like accidental discharge and freeze/crack/leak, mouse chews wires and shorts something, etc. - the *boat* could suffer some damage.

 

Its much easier to remember to charge them if I see them once in a while.

 

Ken

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View PostI leave them in about once a month i turn on the trickel charger for a few days

 

ain't gonna be able to get to them. gonna have the boat shrink-wrapped this year. looks like the shed for them

You know it must be a penguin bound down if you hear that terrible screaming and there ain't no other birds around. 

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IMO If your not gonna store your batteries in a climate controlled enviroment, just disconnect them and leave them in the boat. The best thing is to have an onboard charger that you keep plugged in all the time. But if your boat is shrink wrapped thats gonna be hard. I would fully charge both batteries,disconnect them and see if the boat starts in the spring. If it starts you have good batteries, if it doesn't time for new ones.

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I wouldn't leave them in. It's just asking for corrosion to set in. Especially if it's going to be closed in for a decent time period. I would take them out and set them on a wooden bench or block for the winter. Try to keep them from freezing, as batteries do crack and can lose there power from freezing. You don't necessarily have to charge them all the time, because over charging is just as bad as not enough charge. Leave them alone on the bench, charge them up before you re-install, and let the alternator do the rest!

Pricey doesn't mean better, but cheap is to the bone!

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thanks for the responses. I already have one charged and in the shed and the 2nd one is on the charger now. I bought both batteries new 2 years ago and yesterday was the first time the engine wouldn't start because the battery was dead. That's without being charged once in those two years, sitting in the boat for 2 winters.

You know it must be a penguin bound down if you hear that terrible screaming and there ain't no other birds around. 

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Your actually better of removeing them from the boat. If the charge is drop and you get a nasty cold spell. The batteries can freeze and crack the caseing. Which will drain all the fluid out. I pull mine and put them into the crawl space under the house sitting on a peice of wood.
SOL # 596
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Prolonged exposure to cold weather doesn't really do any good. There is a reason that the marinas remove batteries from boats when they are contracted for winter storage. The best bet is to take them out and bring them inside. The other option is when the boat is shrink wrapped, have a door sewn in so you can access them easily for a quick hookup to a charger. The last thing you really want is to realize your batteries are shot in the Spring and have to buy new ones.

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if a battery maintains a charge, it will survive cold weather. The big IF is the IF. As the charge drops off, the freezing point of the electrolyte rises. At some point, the electrolyte could freeze and ruin the battery ( internal damage, cracking of the case etc.)

So a good battery, fully charged , will do well outside just like your car battery. However with your car, you usually find out in a day or so if the battery lost its charge. Your boat is different. That is why a lot of folks remove their batteries. Note that if you remove the batteries and store them in a place that gets as cold as your boat would, there is no advantage unless you top off the charge every now and then.

For me, even if I don't charge them, I would prefer them to go bad in my shed and not in my boat in case acid leaks.

 

With respect to not storring batteries on concrete floors, that was a good idea years ago when battery cases were made out of different materials. Todays' battery cases are fine placed on the floor.

For the newbies: If you remove your batteries, mark the cables and make a diagram of which cable goes where. You will thank yourself in the spring. That is when you will see a lot of posts about 'bad starters" which are usually incorrectly cabled dual batteries.

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