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The Fishing Pole

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I'm looking to buy an electric guitar but don't want to break the bank in doing so. I'm just starting out in playing so I have very little knowledge on the subject. Looking at some of the websites I've noticed the Epiphone Les Paul's. Most of the reviews on the guitars so far have been good to great and the price is within range. Does anyone here have any experience or knowledge of them and would you recommend them or any other for a first electric.

 

Thanks

TFP

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Nothing wrong with Epiphone. You should go to a large guitar shop, (we have guitar center on the west coast), and try a bunch out. They will let you plug into an amp. Use headphones! Spend a long time trying a bunch out. You really don't need to spend more than $200 for your first electric. Buy a more expensive one a few years later when you really know what you want. You'll be a better musician if you can make a cheap guitar sound good. You can also do very well on used guitars because a lot of people buy them and just let them collect dust. Just my two cents.

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My first guitar was a Made in USA Fender Strat (heart.gif ). I love it!!! Not in your price range, but figured I throw it in there!

 

I haven't any experience with Epiphones (other than knowing that they are cheap knock-offs of Gibson, like Squire is to Fender). You may want to look at Yamaha. They put out some good quality starters, and a lot of times they sell packages that come with the amp too.

 

In terms of where to go, I feel the larger retailers only want to push what THEY need to sell, rather than what would be good for you. I remember a time I went in inquiring about a specific pedal and they tried to sell me some pricey guitar that had effects in it that I wasn't looking for.

 

After trying some out at the large shops, you may want to look around some of the smaller "Mom & Pop" shops and speak to the owners to get their more truthful opinions. (Kinda like getting better fishing tips/advice at smaller B&Ts). Once you are more educated, either purchase it from them, or go back to the larger store with a specific product in mind at a more discounted price. Not to run you around the entire state of MA< but just to make sure you get what you need, and avoid what you don't.

 

Good luck, and rock on!

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As for Epiphone Les Pauls, it's possible to find a gem, but you may need to play 100 of them before you find it. Some of them play better and sound better than the Gibson Les Paul Studio models...which isn't saying much since you need to play a few of them before you find a good one as well.

 

As was already said, go to a large store and play every Les Paul in the store. As you play a few, it will be obvious which are good and which are not. You'll probably end up with a Epiphone Standard Plus or Ultra, both of which will set you back 5 bills with a case.

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I'd recommend you look at spending 4 or 5 bills to get yourself a decent beginning guitar. Bad guitars develop bad habits, and you don't want to find yourself overcompensating for an instrument's faults. Plus, if you don't pursue the instrument, it's easier to unload a halfway-decent guitar than a cheaper model.

 

Ditto on playing as many guitars as you can. Standard M.O. whenever you buy one, of any quality, but crucial in the low- to mid-range. Look at used machines, too, but bring along someone who knows how to assess a guitar for inherent flaws. I like buying used, good quality guitars. They've been broken in, any problems they're going to have are already evident and you can find the occasional great deal.

Ordinary ****ing people - I hate 'em.

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FPole-

 

A lot depends on your playing style and needs.

 

I own quite a few guitars and each has its' own purpose. My favorite all around guitar is an Epi Casino. Great tone and pickups and decent action. Probably around $500. I also own strats, les pauls, SG's and Ricks so I have a reasonble point of comparison. Each has it's own tone, style and action. Kind of like children, or fishing poles...

 

I looked at the Epi Les Paul's for my son and felt that they really didn't have the tone and action for the price. They looked great, but played poorly.

I ended up spending a little more and bought him a Gibson LP Vintage at Guitar Center. @ $800. He too is starting out and can grow into the guitar.

 

If you're looking to spend less than 300-400 you may be able to find something used. As mentioned before, Chavex, Ibanez, Yahama put out some decent lower priced guitars. Buy what feels and sounds good and fits your style. Don't get too caught up on the name. A also agree that buying too cheap will have a negative impact on your playing and learning. Nothing worse than a guitar that keeps falling out of tune or buzzing pickups, etc... Buy as much as you can afford.

 

If you just starting out and uncomfortable "plugging in" at a shop, bring a friend who plays to the shop and let him play. Some of those shop get a little intimidating and sound like a guitar hero workshop. Most reputable shops will help and play some riffs for you, but may not play what you play.

 

Hope this helps and good luck.

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View PostI'm looking to buy an electric guitar but don't want to break the bank in doing so. I'm just starting out in playing so I have very little knowledge on the subject.

 

I've been playing guitar for 20 years and the most I spent on one was $250 for an Epiphone semi-hollow body brand new. I love that guitar. What to get really depends on your playing style, but if you're just starting out you will want to experiment with different styles. If you spend a ton of money on it, you will be afraid to really thrash on it (which is what you will probably want to do some of especially after a fewbeers.gif). Consider getting something less expensive and plan on thrashing the h*** out if. You'll even let friends and kids play it too. The hardest thing to avoid is getting tired and frustrated with guitar (it takes alot of time and practice). You're gonna need one to play when you're mad or drunk. Anyways, I hope you enjoy what you get. Rock out with yer c*** out!wink.gif

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I know you asked about electrics, but I would consider learning on an acoustic. I basically learned on a cheap electric, and developed bad habits. I play an acoustic now and my finger speed and strength cause me alot of trouble, that I attribute to learning on the electric. I could get away with poor playing alot more on an electric. Now that I am on an acoustic, it shows every time I don't have a chord or note right. I am also a really poor technical player...

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View PostAs for Epiphone Les Pauls, it's possible to find a gem, but you may need to play 100 of them before you find it. Some of them play better and sound better than the Gibson Les Paul Studio models...which isn't saying much since you need to play a few of them before you find a good one as well.

 

As was already said, go to a large store and play every Les Paul in the store. As you play a few, it will be obvious which are good and which are not. You'll probably end up with a Epiphone Standard Plus or Ultra, both of which will set you back 5 bills with a case.

 

yup.

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View PostI know you asked about electrics, but I would consider learning on an acoustic. I basically learned on a cheap electric, and developed bad habits. I play an acoustic now and my finger speed and strength cause me alot of trouble, that I attribute to learning on the electric. I could get away with poor playing alot more on an electric. Now that I am on an acoustic, it shows every time I don't have a chord or note right. I am also a really poor technical player...

 

 

I definately second that. I regret learning on an electric for so many years, and then trying to play an acoustic. Once you excel at acoustic, you can pretty much do ANYTHING on electric, as electric have softer, more easily bendable strings tha acous. Very suseptible for bad playing habits!

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Thanks for all your input I will consider all of it. I do have one more question and it's about lessons. Again I don't want to break the bank and some of the places I checked out were pretty expensive for a 20 to 30 min lesson. Are there any good websites or books or DVD's that you could recommend to a beginner. I've always wanted to learn and never did so now that I'm turning 40 next month I figured what the hell, but with work, kids and kids sports my schedule really does not fit taking lessons in private or group for that matter. So any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Again thanks for all your help.

 

TFP

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