numbskull

Conrad

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It is pine, Fred, which isn't right. I had to add a chin weight and tail weight (in addition to the rearward belly weight) to get it to float correctly.

 

I'm pretty sure they are supposed to be birch. Made another out of what I thought was a birch dowel, but it came out too heavy and I've now decided the wood I used was old oak. Here's an xray of an original if someone else wants to try. The lip is unusual, however.

525

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My house is a hospital for vintage plugs. Send me anything 30 years or older and I'll do my best to save them. Please send them in the original box in case I have to bury them.

 

I have limited access to an xray machine where I work.

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Supposedly they were designed to go deep in moving water. Look at the lip shape, location, and line tie position carefully, that's more the secret than the weight. They float level, 2/3 submerged.

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Nice. I was messing with em this spring..I was using some heavier AYC I had lying around.I wanted a plug for the current.The deep face on the lip and the high line tie bring it down.If u want some mad action make the bottom part of the lip a little longer..Well thats what I did And I could barely bring it back....

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Danny named the Conrad after Conrad Malichot (spelling?) of Cape Cod. There are several stories how this plug first got started. Either Conrad asked Danny to make it based on one of Conrad's original designs (said to be made from a heavy hickory hammer handle) or else someone found one (I've heard two different people claimed to be the finder) of Conrad's plug washed up on the beach and asked Danny to make it. Whatever the case may be, we'll probably never know for sure. It seems all accounts credit Conrad with inventing it, but Danny certainly is the one who popularized it. Danny settled on at least three production Conrad sizes over time. The Conrad Jr. you see here was the middle size.

The Conrad Jr. was one of the greatest jetty plugs ever made. These plugs can withstand being banged up badly in a rock environment. Many other plugs do not hold up as well. The Conrad is ruggedly constructed of denser wood than most. This dense wood let it cast like a mortar, even into a wind. Danny's paint finish was not smooth as silk - but was hard as nails. One of the toughest wood plug finishes I have ever seen. The metal lip serves as a bumper guard in rocks, instead of smashing the wood head-first into rocks, which was the ruination of many other plugs used on jetties - but not the Conrad. It was the perfect jetty plug. Best of all, the Conrad Jr. gets down deep and works well in the faster rip tides found around jetties.

The Conrad was the deepest swimming of all Danny's plugs, even in a strong rip. A very slow action was required to get them deep and to keep them down. If you retrieved too fast, it would upset the balance of action. Super slow would cause a wide, rolling sweep from side to side that accounted for many large jetty bass.

It accounted for an awful lot of bass in its day.

Today, I'm not aware of a similar design that has the long distance castability and deep swimming depth that made the Conrad a must-have. Nothing with its features exists in the modern surf anglers repertoire.

It's a deadly Danny plug that's been lost in time and long forgotten.

 

From Russ BassDozer...

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