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I have a few questions for all you seasoned smokers out there.

 

What is your goto wood, good for just about any type of meat?

 

And

 

Does anyone purchase their smoke wood online and where? I'm going to ask at a few of the apple orchards that are near me but I 'm trying to find alder and cherry wood.

 

Thanks

TFP

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Hickory, hickory hickory.

 

I'll grill a steak over all mesquite for a "campfire" groove.

 

I have some maple now, and I am trying to get a flavor I like out of it on chicken-ain't really happening, will keep trying.

“My happiness is not the means to any end. It is the end. It is its own goal. It is its own purpose.”

 

Ayn Rand

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I cook mostly over apple just cause it;s cheap and I get a lot of it. Recentyl got some cherry, good for flavor not so good for temp control. Also have an occaisional hickory chunk and a small peice of mesquite. Scott

 

Try gander mountain or the like. Frequently have 50 pound bags. Scott

 

 

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hickory for beef and pork

 

alder and apple for chicken

 

for bluefish, usually alder or apple..... cherry, maple, and oak i have limited experience with, but they are not objectionable on fish

 

hickory on chicken can be inedible

 

with mesquite, i usually add a blast of it after the first batch of chips (usually hickory) is spent

 

 

green wood can give you lots of creosote (bad), so use dry wood

 

whether you soak it first depends on what kind of smoker you are using

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hickory on chicken can be inedible

 

whether you soak it first depends on what kind of smoker you are using

 

 

Hickory can ruin a bird if you use too much. One fist-size chunk is about all I can stand.

 

Regarding the soaking- In which smoker does it produce a benefit?

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View PostHickory can ruin a bird if you use too much. One fist-size chunk is about all I can stand.

 

Regarding the soaking- In which smoker does it produce a benefit?

 

 

 

i used to have a cylindrical steel smoker which burned charcoal...it had a water pan as well, and two racks above it for the meat

 

i would use real chunk charcoal , and the smoking wood was meant to go right in with the charcoal.....if i didn't soak it, it would burn up in a heartbeat, catching fire and not producing much smoke...i was using split hickory cordwood that i sliced up on my bandsaw, as well as some big saplings i gleaned along the way

 

a few years ago, santa claus brought me a propane fired, stainless steel "smoker" ( i guess it's called a "water cooker" and true BBQ mavens turn their noses up at it...all i know is my ribs are better than any others i have ever tasted)

 

at any rate, from bottom to top, it has one large propane burner, a 12 inch cast iron "brownie pan" with a perforated lid where the wood goes, a round pan that looks like a wash basin you would have taken camping 50 years ago, and four racks for the meat.

 

it has a reasonably accurate thermometer in the door, and i try to run it at or below 225

 

there seems to be a fine line between getting it hot enough to get the chips smoldering without causing the temperature to spike...when i first got it, i soaked the chips since that was what i was used to doing, and wouldn't get any smoke at all unless the temp went up to 300 or so

 

so now, it's dry chips, turn the temp up enough to get them going, then turn it down a bit to maintain the desired temp

 

it will also burn chunks as long as there is good contact with the bottom of the pan, but chips work better

 

and as somebody who used to gather all his own smoking wood, it's killing me to have to buy it in the stores

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View PostSpeckled alder, available in your local wetland is great for fish, poultry and pork.

 

 

 

i think the correct adjective is "sublime"....it really adds a wonderful flavor

 

i have said this in here before, but alder smoked chicken salad with yellow curry infused mayonnaise, toasted pecan halves, and green seedless grapes, served on a bed of greens and washed down with a sturdy white wine, is a pretty difficult meal to beat

 

but i have found that alder produces a lot of creosote if i burn it green

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View PostYou moved?

 

 

 

seven years ago i moved to boston and commuted west to my job about 25 miles inland, where i worked on a 1,000 acre nursery with plenty of woodland and pucker brush...i knew a guy with a tree care company along the way, so it was a piece of cake to get smoking wood

 

last july i parted company with my employer of 30 years, and now i drive east 4 miles to a city owned greenhouse range

 

not too much hickory and alder between me and my job now

 

and not enough time off yet to go stock up

 

 

maybe it is time to update my profile

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View Postseven years ago i moved to boston and commuted west to my job about 25 miles inland, where i worked on a 1,000 acre nursery with plenty of woodland and pucker brush...i knew a guy with a tree care company along the way, so it was a piece of cake to get smoking wood

 

last july i parted company with my employer of 30 years, and now i drive east 4 miles to a city owned greenhouse range

 

not too much hickory and alder between me and my job now

 

and not enough time off yet to go stock up

 

 

maybe it is time to update my profile

 

 

got iticon14.gif

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