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Mullet Miller

Kayak Safety

114 posts in this topic


I am taking the plunge and buying a Hobie Outback in the next couple of weeks.  This thread has opened my eyes to things I was not thinking about particularly how lanyards come tangle hazards which has made me rethink my plan on securing fishing rods and the like.    Great thread folks -  hopefully as time goes on I will be able to add something here as my experience grows. 

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So how do we buy one?

 

 

Waterbug is starting to get them in brick and motar stores. The Kayak Fishing Store in North Wildwood has them, as I think they will make their way to the Fairfield store as well.

 

As far as asking where online, that cannot be answered here.

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*******Edited*****

2nd option Visit a popular Kayak retailer in Cape May County

3rd win one at either the Duke of Fluke or the 5th anual Elks Fluke tournaments

 

I'm still waiting on the Kayak Fishing Store up North to check it out. If anyone stops in there ask about it. It might speed things up. Same goes for any other store that sells kayak fishing accessories. Just have them contact me and I will be glad to pay them a visit.

 

Bug, there is a reason I stated in my post above that where to buy online would not be answered here.

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I did not see on here one thing that i have learned since i started kayaking... Get yourself a handheld waterproof GPS which you can program spots into. This is great for refinding new spots as well as getting to old spots, and even for finding your way to shore. I sometimes wash up miles N of where i set out thanks to being pushed by the gulf stream and its a real pain to find where i left the truck without that GPS system. 

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Plus, i just wear shorts and a T shirt when i go out as it is warm here and the water cools me off. Bring PLENTY OF WATER. If it is even a little chilly i suggest the dry top, but not the pants as they could fill with water 1/5 times you are dunked.. i have only flipped once in my kayak while reboarding after spearfishing, but iff you drown out there, theres no one to save you.

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I did not see on here one thing that i have learned since i started kayaking... Get yourself a handheld waterproof GPS which you can program spots into. This is great for refinding new spots as well as getting to old spots, and even for finding your way to shore. I sometimes wash up miles N of where i set out thanks to being pushed by the gulf stream and its a real pain to find where i left the truck without that GPS system. 

 

Gps is a super tool, and should be on every YF's boat off the beach and anywhere at night. The Batteries sometimes get thin and its possible to lose one. A good memorized landmark should be carried too. BTW.... Nice Snook!

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Spinfisherbob View Post

Gps is a super tool, and should be on every YF's boat off the beach and anywhere at night. The Batteries sometimes get thin and its possible to lose one. A good memorized landmark should be carried too. BTW.... Nice Snook!



 



I have mine tied to my kayak and turn it off when its not being used. lasts like 7 hours. and thanks



im sorry. what does YF mean?

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I'm new to SOL and am glad to see this thread.  I was also glad to see someone mention foatation for the kayak.  The concern is not so much a hole in the kayak as it is a hatch leaking or being sucked off or imploded in rough conditions.  Most hatches leak and the larger ones can let in lots of water just from waves and spray.  Some hatch materials decompose over time and may fail while on the water.  Once sufficient water gets into the boat it can sink, become too unstable or waterlogged to paddle, or end up in a Cleopatra's Needle position with the bow or stern submerged and the other end out of the water. 



 



Bulkheads can prevent some of the problems, but even in my SINK which has three bulkheads and watertight hatches I carry extra floatation.  I've had hatch covers come off in surf or develop cracks on the water (I should have been checking them).  I was glad I had some drybags in the compartments.



 



Floatation can be anything from drybags to empty soda bottles to float bags to fit your hull shape.  Make sure you have it distributed in such a way that the boat will float in a stable position if flooded.  Ideally the floatation should be secured so that it doesn't move around once water gets into the hull.



 



For those with relatively small hatch covers carrying a spare cover for each hatch-size on your boat is a good idea.  Spares covers could be homemade out of neoprene and bungee cord.

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Electronics can and do malfunction from time to time on a kayak. For that reason, I've always had a compass on my yak in addition to the gps.

 

Instead of a flag, I have a piece of orange pool noodle placed over my light mast, sticking up several feet above my crate. I've been told that I could be seen about a mile away because of it. The bigger the chop, the more it waves around and draws attention. Also visible from every direction versus a flag.

 

I also have 10-12 pool noodles stuffed into my yak for flotation. It's easy to distribute them evenly from one end of the yak to the other and it gives me great comfort that I am not going down no matter how big a hole I gash in that yak.

 

Last spring I did a roll and self rescue with waders that I purposely wore over my splash top (note, not even a full dry top) instead of under it, just to see how much leakage I would get. I did this when the water was still in the 40's. I do admit that i took in a quart or two of water that was a little shocking,..but after about 5seconds, I acclimated to the cold water and then I calmly grabbed the drive fins of my Hobie and easily rolled it back over without the aid of any extra gizmos. Btw, I did this in much less time than it took that guy in the video to swim around from one side of his yak to the other while finding and setting up his patented rope. Then, even with cold water down to my toes, I was still able to easily swim back up onto my yak. The whole key to doing this is to not panic once you hit the water. Even if the water is cold enough to take your breath away,..that shock is quite temporary and as long as you can stay calm, it quickly subsides and you can then do what you need to do!

( I learned this from watching a guy teaching ice-fishing self rescue.....he was able to repeatedly jump into a hole in the ice and then rescue himself a bunch of times before he eventually began to get hypothermia. You do not die from the ice water temps for a surprisingly long time...you die from the panic that keeps you from being able to do a self rescue.)

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This stuf is great! I don't know if this makes sense to anyone else , but where I fish you can wait on the beach for help a long time ,so being able to get a fire going can help to get warm quick and also works for signaling. Waterproof matches don't take up a lot of room and can be handy, and if your lighter gets wet you can still smoke.

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Has anyone tried the dry pants and dry top combo? I see kayak dry pants go for $100 and I already own the dry top. Was thinking about using this combo early spring.

 

Any thoughts?

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