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ex-bunker dunker

tank round

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i have one sitting in my room, its inert obviously, but i do not know anything about it, my grandfather was a tank gunner in WWII, its got a wooden projectile in it now, i will post pictures later when im not half awake, im really curious to find out what it was from.

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How do you know its inert? Whack the fire out of it with a hammer and let us know what happens.

It might be "ert".

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well i've had it for alot of years, and know that there are a few older folks on here who might be interested in helping me find out its origins and stuff.... how about i point it at you when i whack the primer cwm40.gif

 

edit;

THE bottom reads3 in mk 9 mod 0.50 cal

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That's a machine gun round from one of the Browning .50 calibers the Sherman carried.

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75mm Sherman shell...3 in being the key number (75mm = 2.9528", close enough to 3)..I think the 0.50 caliber designation is barrel length. Any tankers out there??? even current ones..I think they still use that designation

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How do you know its inert? Whack the fire out of it with a hammer and let us know what happens.

It might be "ert".

 

4h2or37.jpg

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That's a machine gun round from one of the Browning .50 calibers the Sherman carried.

 

 

It's more likely a naval anti-aircraft round. The caliber nomenclature refers to the relationship between the diameter of the round and length of the gun:

 

150" gun by 3" round = 3" 50cal

 

I was a cavalry scout on a Sheridan tank and I don't remember the Army using that type of designation. IF I remember correctly the rounds were identified only by bore size (152mm) and type (HEAT, HE, AP). I don't think there was any reference to bore length.

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It's more likely a naval anti-aircraft round. The caliber nomenclature refers to the relationship between the diameter of the round and length of the gun:

 

150" gun by 3" round = 3" 50cal

 

I was a cavalry scout on a Sheridan tank and I don't remember the Army using that type of designation. IF I remember correctly the rounds were identified only by bore size (152mm) and type (HEAT, HE, AP). I don't think there was any reference to bore length.

 

 

I would agree if it said 50cal, but this says .50cal per dunker headscratch.gif

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That sounds like something you would find on navy deck gun ammo, not army tank ammo.

 

Based on what you told us--that would be a round/replica from a 3"/50 cal deck gun (or 3/50 or 3 in/50 etc..) Nomenclature means the gun had a three inch diameter (caliber) barrel; and it was rifled so that there was one complete turn (360 degrees) of rifling in any 50 inch length of the barrel. (A rifling constant of one turn per 50 inches of length.)

 

Ask a squid (who has been around awhile--I'd guess prior to 1930 based on the Mk9 designation)

 

[On the Sheridan/M551--believe 152mm was the antitank missile's cal. The regular tank ammo the 551 fired was same 105mm ammo that the M60 main gun used. Had some kind of slick hydraulic system that allowed firing of both rounds from the same gun???]

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That sounds like something you would find on navy deck gun ammo, not army tank ammo.

 

Ask a squid (who has been around awhile)

 

[On the Sheridan/M551--believe 152mm was the antitank missile's cal. The regular tank ammo the 551 fired was same 105mm ammo that the M60 main gun used. Had some kind of slick hydraulic system that allowed firing of both rounds from the same gun???]

 

 

Nope...both rounds were the same diameter. The shilleglah missile is longer than the conv round. I've fired both.

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Nope...both rounds were the same diameter. The shilleglah missile is longer than the conv round. I've fired both.

 

 

Sorry--I was a grunt. I never saw a missile get fired. Remember the tankers having major concerns about the breach hydraulic system that was unique to the Sheridan.

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