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Waveridr85

Fluke/striper Fishing 101

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First and foremost let me say I love the say that I love the water as much as possible, thats why I am looknig to start fishing.

 

I am about as new to fishing as they get. I've read up a decnet amount, but still am very uneducated. I've got 2 poles I've aquired over fishing expeditions we had "attempted". One about 6.5 feet and the other is a surf casting rod.

 

All I know is that I would liek to catch soem fish and eat them. but don't have the slightest idea as far as porper tackle and rod setup.

 

On the smaller pole I am looknig to catch fluke from either piers or inlets. i knwo i need to fish the bottom for these fish. I do not have a boat. I bought myself a premade rig from walmart. I am curiosu as what types of weights I shoudl use with it?, along with what type of bait to use, if any, with a plastic/gummey squid.

 

Second is surf casting for stripers. Here, I havent a clue as what to use. I was told a diamond jig with a hook with a green or red rubber surgical tube type of thing on it will worlk well. I have also been told to use fresh clams, but do not know if they need to be wigthed down or what not.

 

 

Please help. I am sure I will have fun if i don't catch anything, but catching some good eating fish is always fun. Thanks.

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One of the most common ways to catch stripers is real basic fresh bait clam or bunker . fish finder rig sinker and a hook , size according to the bait you use. keep things as simple and be patient good luck

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One of the most common ways to catch stripers is real basic fresh bait clam or bunker . fish finder rig sinker and a hook , size according to the bait you use. keep things as simple and be patient good luck

 

Now this will have the clam or bunker lay near the bottom. is that what i want to do?

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Yea. If the water is fairly calm you can use a 2 ounce or so weight. Normally striped bass like areas with turbulent water or moving water that either washes the bait downstream, or disorients it, and they also like to hide behind rocks or other structure of some sort near the water where the bait is vulnerable. In moving water or surf you might need as much as 6 or even 8 oz sinkers to hold the bottom.

Scout out areas which have the type of water described above. River mouths, breachways, "rips" where moving water is forced over a shallower sand bar or rocky reef, and surf are good places to look for. If you're fishing a beach with surf, look for structure and troughs and holes in the sand which will provide cover for lurking fish.

Think like a fish young jedi. cwm12.gif Where would you go to find vulnerable baitfish and an easy spot to lurk and/or travel in the search?

If you use bunker chunks, a simple once through pass with 1 1/2 to 2 inch pieces, with plenty of hook point exposed is your best bet.

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Now this will have the clam or bunker lay near the bottom. is that what i want to do?

 

 

It depends on how 'hands on' you want to be with your fishing. The easiest thing to do is to put the bait on the bottom using a fish finder rig. However, there are times where drifting the bait back in the current while you pay out line (so the bait still gets down in the water column) is a better option...especially when the water depth isn't that great and the current is slower. The bait will still make it's way to the bottom but drift around more naturally. (Btw, this first paragraph pertains more so to stripers, not fluke).

 

Another way to fish both stripers and fluke is to bounce bucktails off the bottom...if you'd like to enhance your chances a bit, you can 'tip' your bucktail with a strip baits such as squid or if you happen to catch a sea robin or sand shark, a strip from the white side of it's belly. Of course with fluke, you want to use something a little smaller than what you'd use to fish stripers. Plastic baits work well too.

 

A typical fluke rig is something called a 'three-way'. Basically, it's a three way swivel where you attach one side to the main line, a sinker to another and a 3 ft leader w/hook to the last. A typical bait for this rig is strips of squid (or fish belly), killies or spearing-you can use these baits individually or in combination such as strip bait/killie or strip bait and spearing. When using this method, either make sure there is sufficient current to move the bait along the bottom or slowing reel the bait in as if you were 'trolling' (of course actual trolling is from a boat, but you can simulate a similar action by reeling in slowly).

 

There's a lot more ways to learn. But I think these tactics, along with one or two already posted will get you started. I'm a very 'hands on' fisherman and like to use methods (mostly via artificials) that keep me participating to the fullest. It's up to you to judge what kind of fisherman you'd like to be and don't let anyone push you one way or the other.

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Don't forget the search function here. Just type in the term you are looking to find and you will get back the posts that deal with your questions. Many pics have picures attached. There are also articles here (look at the top of the page and click on articles) .

 

 

 

Be patient. REad everything you can get your hands on and you might consider going to the food fling in march to meet up woth some of the folks here. Always helps to hook up with an experienced fisherman to show you the ropes. Hanging out at tackle shops helps as does taking party boat trip once in a while. The mates are loaded with info.

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I'd like to say thanks to all those who contributed, your info helped me out a lot. Thanks for the time you put into writing those posts.

 

one more question, when I surf cast for striper, while using a fish finder rig, do I need to retreive and cast, and keep doing so, or do I let the bait sit?

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You can let it sit and kick back in a chair if that suits you. When i started, i was a bait fisherman. It helped me to learn what types of places fish could be found in. As i got more experienced and had some fish under my belt, i wanted to use more active techniques and lately i only use plugs. Another method you can use that is a cross between bait fishing and plugging is to use live eels. Hook an unweighted eel through the eye socket and cast and retrieve very slowly.

 

If you get more ambitious and want to try artificial lures bucktails as mentioned above are a great way to start. Another lure that works really well is a metal lipped or plastic swimmer (available here on the online store). When using artificials, you can really use the force more (continuing my jedi training advice from above lol sorry) to target specific spots. Let it roll in the surf a little bit. Cast it behind a rock that you know might hold a fish. Let it get swept in the current like a struggling baitfish. You can move down a beach and cover lots of areas. Use a slow retrieve, just enough to give the lure it's proper action when targetting striped bass.

 

Artificial lures to me are more satisfying, but you really need to be more activley putting them in spots you think are likely to hold fish. There's less chance of intercepting a passing fish than there is with a weighted bait chunk. Casting for hours on a featureless beach with no cover might get you a fish, but more likely will get you tired arms.

Also, for striped bass, except in the early spring and late fall it's a night time game. You'll have a much better chance of catching fish after dark.

 

Good luck, I'll be pulling for ya.

Len

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I'd like to say thanks to all those who contributed, your info helped me out a lot. Thanks for the time you put into writing those posts.

 

one more question, when I surf cast for striper, while using a fish finder rig, do I need to retreive and cast, and keep doing so, or do I let the bait sit?

 

 

 

As mentioned above, you can let it sit there...but I'd make sure that you have a long enough leader so that the bait can move around in the current. To me, using a very short leader in that situation 'kills' the action.

 

If the current is enough to drift the bait around a bit, all the better. That's why if I ever do use a bait/weighted rig set up, I use the lightest sinker I can cast and I always use a barrel weight so that it's easier to roll around in the sand. The flip side is that you don't want the sinker so light that you have to recast every two minutes...although in my mind, that's not as much of a disadvantage as you might think.

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As mentioned above, you can let it sit there...but I'd make sure that you have a long enough leader so that the bait can move around in the current. To me, using a very short leader in that situation 'kills' the action.

 

If the current is enough to drift the bait around a bit, all the better. That's why if I ever do use a bait/weighted rig set up, I use the lightest sinker I can cast and I always use a barrel weight so that it's easier to roll around in the sand. The flip side is that you don't want the sinker so light that you have to recast every two minutes...although in my mind, that's not as much of a disadvantage as you might think.

 

How about if I were to use a relativly large wight on a slider clip (not sure what it is called), this way the current can take the bait?

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