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Trash Talk

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The other thread and an article I read in I think Northeast Angler has me thinking about the bounty we toss out in favor of more coveted, but strained, stock.

 

There are many examples of trash fish with the right marketing now make the finest menus, like orange roughy, mahi mahi and chilean sea bass.

 

Let's hear the trash fish you like to eat.

 

for me, skate comes to mind,

 

Oceana has skate on their menu, and I have had it a few times. Hard to believe I toss 'em over when I'm fishing, but will pay top dollar to have it served in some fancy schmancy place.

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The other thread and an article I read in I think Northeast Angler has me thinking about the bounty we toss out in favor of more coveted, but strained, stock.

 

 

 

 

 

There are many examples of trash fish with the right marketing now make the finest menus, like orange roughy, mahi mahi and chilean sea bass.

 

 

 

 

 

Let's hear the trash fish you like to eat.

 

 

 

 

 

for me, skate comes to mind,

 

 

 

 

 

Oceana has skate on their menu, and I have had it a few times. Hard to believe I toss 'em over when I'm fishing, but will pay top dollar to have it served in some fancy schmancy place.

 

 

 

 

Mahi is a trash fish? Never liked the term in general, but if there is one fish that deserves that title it's "WHITE TUNA"...not tuna, but marketed as such by the BS commercial seafood industry.

 

 

Actually a bycatch...the fish is actually called Escolar. Banned by the FDA until the early 90s...now back on the market. I ate a bunch one night thinking it was White Albacore Tuna. Not even close....

 

 

 

 

 

Below describes my personal escolar hell for 3 days...

 

 

 

 

 

The escolar, Lepidocybium flavobrunneum, is a snake mackerel, the only species in the genus Lepidocybium. It is found in deep (200-885 m) tropical and temperate waters around the world.

 

 

The escolar is dark brown in colour, growing darker with age until it is quite black. It is a fast-swimming fish with a prominent lateral keel and multiple finlets. It grows up to 2 m in length.

 

 

Like its relative the oilfish, Ruvettus pretiosus, the escolar is consumed in several European and Asian countries, as well as in the USA. Neither fish metabolises the wax esters (Gempylotoxin) naturally found in their diet, which causes an oil content in the muscle meat of the fish amounting to 18-21%. These wax esters may rapidly cause gastrointestinal symptoms following consumption; however, these effects are usually short lived.

 

 

The gastrointestinal symptoms, called "keriorrhoea", caused by these wax esters may include oily orange diarrhea, discharge, or leakage from the rectum that may smell of mineral oil. The discharge can stain clothing and occur without warning 30 minutes to 36 hours after consuming the fish. The oil may pool in the rectum and cause frequent urges for bowel movements due to its lubricant qualities and may be accidentally discharged by the passing of gas. Symptoms may occur over a period of one or more days. Other symptoms may include stomach cramps, loose bowel movements, diarrhea, headaches, nausea, and vomiting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As commercial fishing continues to wipe out good eating fish until they are commercially extinct, we'll get more and more of these types of fish at the markets and menus. Mmmmmmm...

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Pink Salmon and Dolly Varden. My summer residence is spent in southeast Alaska and believe it or not amongst locals these fish are inferior to the other salmon and trout. As far as salmon go, aside from a few locals that swear by them for smoking, only the "tourons" walk away from the streams with these fish. Mostly everyone else opts for Reds, Kings, & Silvers.

 

As for me it's a meal and a good one at that.

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btw - there's a great read on the history of the chilean sea bass coming to fruition as a prized culinary treat.

 

Hooked: Pirates Poaching and the Perfect Fish, by G. Bruce Knecht.

 

Just finished it and I'd reccommend it to anyone looking for a new book.

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Sea Robins! Actually Noreast Club mag had a list of trash fish and recipes for them including skate, dogfish and bergals. The author claims you can't tell the difference in taste between fluke and sea robin, plus you can catch as many as you want. Any takers?

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I heart.gif Sea Robins!. drool.gif I'd rather eat them any day of the week. They are like a mouth full of sugar. Real sweet tasting fish.

 

I think fluke taste Nasty!

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Albies, I have eaten them and like them when prepared properly. Unfortunately, I don't know how to prepare them properly.

 

D

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Second the Sea Robin vote. Not much meat on them, but tasty as heck.

 

 

 

Gonna try skate this year since we can buy the skate wings for 8 bucks a pound in the fish market.

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Pink Salmon and Dolly Varden. My summer residence is spent in southeast Alaska and believe it or not amongst locals these fish are inferior to the other salmon and trout. As far as salmon go, aside from a few locals that swear by them for smoking, only the "tourons" walk away from the streams with these fish. Mostly everyone else opts for Reds, Kings, & Silvers.

 

 

As for me it's a meal and a good one at that.

 

Those ocean bright humpies sure look good to eat?? I don't know why more folks eat them, guess its from seeing them after they been around awhile, like swimming zombies cwm31.gifcwm31.gif

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Monkfish

 

In the old days the scallopers used to get lots of them in the dredges. They brought in some tails but most just went out the scuppers, what a waste. That aint the case nowdays, the livers bring big money & the tails ain't cheap either.

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Gonna try skate this year since we can buy the skate wings for 8 bucks a pound in the fish market.

 

 

 

You probrably have already eaten skate. When you buy scallops at a local grocery store and the all seem to have the same uniformity in shape and size. Its probrably skate wings. They do that to save on cost and when scallops are as availible.

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There was another thread on this, useful info posted. I have been eating sea robins (and not ashamed to admit it!) since a pb captain prepared some a few years ago. Not much meat as the other guys said, but I only keep the biggest ones, They eat the same things as bass, and lots of small shellfish, so their meat tastes real sweet. Only a small portion is usable, that's why it only pays to keep large ones. Use only the belly to the tail. Try them once, and you won't throw them back.

 

Skate wings are good if you use the largest ones - 8 lbs or more. There are few bones in the meaty part, and if you cook right, tastes just like scallops. (The larger ones are presented as scallops in some places). - Dark

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