Kings over Queens

Is it a parents obligation to pay for a kids college?

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You guys footing the bill for grad school are waaaaaay to kind! One son said he’s done BS marketing is all he needs.

The other son just finished his 1st two grad classes for a Masters in Marketing Analytics. His company is giving him $6500/yr. HE’s paying the rest :D 

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4 hours ago, FishermanTim said:

Way too many kids go to college with no game plan on what they want to study.

They also EXPECT mom and dad to pay for a 4 year party-fest.

Then when they finally graduate with a lame-assed liberal arts degree in some dead language, useless profession like a Dairy Anthropologist (study of milkmen) or failed outright, then these family jewels can't fathom why they can't get a job other than (maybe) a cashier in a supermarket or fast food joint.

 

I know a girl form my youth who went to Boston University, got a degree in broadcasting, and got a job at the local supermarket.

2 of my nephew (years apart/different families) graduated with degrees in game/web design, and all those jobs they were expecting never happened and their 4 years tuition only went to further whatever "college they went to' s own agenda.

 

Then My younger sister went to school for a nursing degree. She worked weekends at the Brigham's & Women's hospital while she was in school. She worked in the same field she was studying for, and when she graduated, she had paid off almost all of her loans. AND she had received a job offer from the hospital before she graduated, so she already had a job lined up, which she still has decades later.

 

If you want to pay for your child's education, you had better make sure they know that you expect/demand they have a definitive game plan in mind. If not, you are pretty much setting them up for failure.

Not all, but more and more each time around seem to fall into this trap.

  

Interesting perspective, do you have 1st person experience with a liberal arts program/degree? I'm guessing you don't. I do, since that's what I graduated with before 40 years in IT management. I would say over 70% of the people I've hired had a liberal arts background, often my best performers. I need to put them in environments or on projects that cover a wide range of needs. Some are exciting and challenging, others are gawd awful boring but necessary. The BA kids are used to that - in addition to the stuff they studied that was of interest to them they also had to get through stuff that had no apparent relevance but still demanded a lot of effort - they can handle that. Some of my more technically advanced employees just had no patience for projects or subject matters they felt was "below" them and they unfortunately were not good at hiding their disdain from the users. Guess who the users want to work with? Most of my BA kids speak a second language to some extent, in my environment we have a lot of people on the floor who struggle with English, guess who they want to work with? Are there areas where a liberal arts degree is less of a fit, absolutely and honestly they tend to be the type of roles that the BAs would hate doing anyway. But if you think that BA is a one way ticket to Pizza Hut you may want to Google "CEOs with Liberal Arts degrees". It takes all kinds in business too.

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4 hours ago, FishermanTim said:

Way too many kids go to college with no game plan on what they want to study.

They also EXPECT mom and dad to pay for a 4 year party-fest.

Then when they finally graduate with a lame-assed liberal arts degree in some dead language, useless profession like a Dairy Anthropologist (study of milkmen) or failed outright, then these family jewels can't fathom why they can't get a job other than (maybe) a cashier in a supermarket or fast food joint.

 

I know a girl form my youth who went to Boston University, got a degree in broadcasting, and got a job at the local supermarket.

2 of my nephew (years apart/different families) graduated with degrees in game/web design, and all those jobs they were expecting never happened and their 4 years tuition only went to further whatever "college they went to' s own agenda.

 

Then My younger sister went to school for a nursing degree. She worked weekends at the Brigham's & Women's hospital while she was in school. She worked in the same field she was studying for, and when she graduated, she had paid off almost all of her loans. AND she had received a job offer from the hospital before she graduated, so she already had a job lined up, which she still has decades later.

 

If you want to pay for your child's education, you had better make sure they know that you expect/demand they have a definitive game plan in mind. If not, you are pretty much setting them up for failure.

Not all, but more and more each time around seem to fall into this trap.

  

How did the kids with the game/web design degrees not find a job? Seems like there should be plenty of opportunities in web and app designs. 

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12 hours ago, z-man said:

How did the kids with the game/web design degrees not find a job? Seems like there should be plenty of opportunities in web and app designs. 

Yeah, but when way too many kids all have the same idea for their majors, the jobs aren't as plentiful when they graduate because there is a flood of applicants for those jobs.

Remember, many of the kids figured they could make a career out of playing video games. Then they realize the job is in design not just playing, and then they really realize they are one of hundreds who made that same decision.

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12 hours ago, stormy monday said:

Interesting perspective, do you have 1st person experience with a liberal arts program/degree? I'm guessing you don't. I do, since that's what I graduated with before 40 years in IT management. I would say over 70% of the people I've hired had a liberal arts background, often my best performers. I need to put them in environments or on projects that cover a wide range of needs. Some are exciting and challenging, others are gawd awful boring but necessary. The BA kids are used to that - in addition to the stuff they studied that was of interest to them they also had to get through stuff that had no apparent relevance but still demanded a lot of effort - they can handle that. Some of my more technically advanced employees just had no patience for projects or subject matters they felt was "below" them and they unfortunately were not good at hiding their disdain from the users. Guess who the users want to work with? Most of my BA kids speak a second language to some extent, in my environment we have a lot of people on the floor who struggle with English, guess who they want to work with? Are there areas where a liberal arts degree is less of a fit, absolutely and honestly they tend to be the type of roles that the BAs would hate doing anyway. But if you think that BA is a one way ticket to Pizza Hut you may want to Google "CEOs with Liberal Arts degrees". It takes all kinds in business too.

Don't get me wrong, I shouldn't have generalized all Liberal Arts degrees that way.

But you have to admit, there are quite a few kids that have little or no desire/drive to exceed in a particular field of study. The smart kids (logically smart) have a game plan and take steps to follow that plan.

Others make the presumption that just by having a college degree means they should be qualified for every job they want, regardless of the requirements needed for that job.

I work in a financial environment, and my bosses would lament over the number of college grads who expected to walk in off the street and make CEO money for an entry level job.

(Between that and the hilariously composed resumes, it boggles the mind how these kids can succeed in the real world.)

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i didnt read all the pages.

 

my answer is to each his own.

i paid for both my kids to go to Rowan College for two years after community college.   was it hard ? sure. but i am of the belief to have your kids do better then yourself.   neither my wife or i went to college.

my wife is now a nurse and i run a supply store. my daughter is a teacher and my son is a property manager.   they both are in there mid twenties and my son makes more money then we do and  i am proud to say it. my daughter is getting paid pretty good also.

i did have both my kids pay for the books they needed so they didnt get off scott free.   they both worked in high school and college. 

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