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Ultralight

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Brook trout from beaver dams.

 

Any fish if the water does not have stuff that they can break you off on. That might sound funny to anglers in some parts of the country, but here we have lots of lakes without stumps, fallen timber, or even vegetation in some cases. My biggest bass, 7.5 lbs., was caught on 4 lb. line and I'm sure that I could have landed it on 2 lb. line in that particular lake. There just wasn't anything for it to wrap the line around. It ran pretty far a couple of times, but I got it in the end.

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I love catching trout stockies in clear water on 2 lb test on my 4' 6" ultra lite. Landed some nice LMB and pickerel with it also.

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Thanks for the feedback, guys. Do you prefer UL rods in these situations for any tactical advantages (better presentations, etc.) that produce more fish or because they are simply more fun to use when deal with smaller species?

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There are some baits and lures that you can present with ultralight that you just can't present any other way.

 

The 7.5 lb. largemouth that I caught was taken on a single nightcrawler, cast unweighted on a #10 hook. I scour my nightcrawlers so that they're tough and stay on the hook. If you can manage to cast a bait like that in front of a good-sized bass, there is no way that it is not biting. I like to fish crayfish in the same way. Believe it or not, it is very easy to get solid hookups with a #10 hook, and the light line forces you to play the fish so that you don't pull the hook out. I think that I get more hookups with such a small hook than with the bigger hooks, because the small hooks are so sharp.

 

I also like to cast extremely light lures for trout, like the Little Joe spinners, that are tough to get out without extremely light line.

 

The key is to not get too attached to one method of fishing. You have to assess the situation, and what you're after. I like to use ultralight, but believe me I'll chunk heavy spoons with my baitcaster, or pull out the flyrod and cast nymphs, depending on the fishing situation. Ultralight is just another type of tackle, and you have to know when to use it.

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I love fishing ultralights for many reasons. Bluegills fight like monsters. Stockie and small native trout are a blast. I can hike into the harder to reach places more easily. I can pitch a lure almost anywhere in heavy cover like overhanging bushes and trees. I love pitching rebel crickhoppers underneath trees and bushes in the Summertime. More times than not if there's a fish around, it will smack that lure the second it hits the water.

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There are some baits and lures that you can present with ultralight that you just can't present any other way.

 

The 7.5 lb. largemouth that I caught was taken on a single nightcrawler, cast unweighted on a #10 hook. I scour my nightcrawlers so that they're tough and stay on the hook. If you can manage to cast a bait like that in front of a good-sized bass, there is no way that it is not biting. I like to fish crayfish in the same way. Believe it or not, it is very easy to get solid hookups with a #10 hook, and the light line forces you to play the fish so that you don't pull the hook out. I think that I get more hookups with such a small hook than with the bigger hooks, because the small hooks are so sharp.

 

I also like to cast extremely light lures for trout, like the Little Joe spinners, that are tough to get out without extremely light line.

 

The key is to not get too attached to one method of fishing. You have to assess the situation, and what you're after. I like to use ultralight, but believe me I'll chunk heavy spoons with my baitcaster, or pull out the flyrod and cast nymphs, depending on the fishing situation. Ultralight is just another type of tackle, and you have to know when to use it.

 

 

I agree. I break out the UL when trout fishing in clear water since the 2 lb test seems to shine where water clarity is an issue. Also, many times I'm using very light spinners or power bait with a single split-shot and the light line casts well with such little weight.

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USe mine for browns and rainbows in clear water with 6 lb fireline and a 4lb flouro leader. I would go 4 lb fireline next spool up. Throuw tiny jigs and spinners as as small husky jerks, pin minnows and rapalas.

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I love using an untralight when stalking small streams for brookies, although as NTS pointed out, you can land much bigger fish if you use the rod correctly. The big advantage of ultralight is that it allows you to get into compact space, increases your precision in casting and, in my experience, gives you a tool to present smaller baits and lures in a natural manner, to say nothing of the benefit of feeling your bait as it progresses through the current. Sometimes I have to leave it at home in order to sue the flyrod more. I love the UL. heart.gif

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Doug, I forgot to mention that this is a GREAT outfit to have in your trunk to stop and throw a couple of casts in local waters. When I lived on the island, I used to roam Calverton and pull over with some frequency. Always fun to land a trout or bass on your way somewhere else! wink.gif

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What do you mean by scouring the nightcrawlers?

 

After I catch them, I refrigerate them in fresh wet grass clippings, with no dirt whatsover. The clippings have to be fresh and green. You can use any type of hay or weed, as long as it is fresh. Some people use moss. But the rule is not to use any dirt. Use a lot of clippings. I usually fill up a quart plastic yogurt container with clippings, loosely, then add 1-2 dozen nightcrawlers on top. They will quickly work their way down and through the clippings, which is what you want. After a couple of days, the nightcrawlers have excreted a lot of the droppings inside their bodies, and their skin is much tougher than it is when you catch them. The only way I can describe them is as taut, instead of mushy. You can cast them farther when they are scoured, and they stay on the hook better.

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