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You're doomed.wink.gif

Not too tricky, but there are different methods (slow vs fast oven). I just did one with the real slow method. It was good, but not exactly what I wanted.

Go to foodtv dot com and you can search. Alton Brown has the "slow method" (you don't need the flower pot!) that I did.

If you check Ina Garten's (Barefoot Contessa show) she has the fast method. I am going to try that one next time.

Salt pepper, done. Pan gravy or a horseradish something. That's what makes it the best-very simple.

Go today and get a remote thermometer, the company that makes a good one is Polder. THIS IS KEY!

“My happiness is not the means to any end. It is the end. It is its own goal. It is its own purpose.”

 

Ayn Rand

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in a nutshell:

 

take the trouble to spend 20 bucks on a digital thermometer with a remote probe...some brands are better than others, there is at least one thread in here if you want to look it up...insert the probe into the thickest part of the meat, away from any bones

 

bring the roast to room temperature, and coat it heavily with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

there are a million different things you can put on it, but i prefer it simple

 

put the roast, fat side up on a rack in a roasting pan....the sides of the pan should not be too high relative to the roast

 

put it on the middle shelf of a preheated 450 degree oven...after 30 minutes turn the oven down a little, maybe to 400

 

cook it to an internal temp of 120 degrees, take it out of the oven and let it rest at least half an hour....(the temp will continue to rise quite a bit)

 

 

if you don't want to buy the thermometer, take a piece of coat hanger and bend a little handle on one end, then clean it thoroughly

 

depending on how big the roast is, in an hour and a bit or so (to be on the safe side because you want to make sure you don't overcook it), take the roast out, close the oven door, stick the coat hanger/probe into the roast and wait about 20 seconds...take the probe out and touch it to the inside of your wrist (the same place as you check a baby bottle).....AS SOON AS you reflexively need to pull the probve away for fear of getting burned, the roast is done

 

 

 

don't worry about timing too much, it is much better to have the meat a bit on the cool side than it is to have everybody waiting while you hack at a piping hot expensive hunk of meat

 

 

since you went to the trouble and expense of getting a nice roast, treat yourself to some yorkshire pudding!

 

 

enjoy, and happy holidays

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You're doomed.wink.gif

 

 

Thanks for the replies. Where can I get one of the Polder thermometers?

Do they sell them at Home cheapo. I really don't want to drive around looking for one on the Friday before Christmas.........Its a zoo out there.

 

One more question. It's about a 10lb roast would one method be better then the other because of the size, or is there no difference?

 

Merry Christmas

TFP

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I'll throw in my two cents......I have been making it this way for quite awhile, and always comes out good. In fact, I made one last Saturday, and will be doing it again on Christmas Day. This is somewhat stolen from Tyler Florence.

 

 

 

Amounts given will vary depending on the size of the roast. I make a two rib roast (about 3 pounds), so this is based on that.

 

 

 

Let the roast sit on the counter for a couple hours to come to room temp.

 

 

 

Peel and run thru a press about 7-8 cloves of garlic. Add about a large palmful of kosher salt (that may seem like a lot, but no worries, it doesn't make the roast too salty.) Add about a palmful of chopped fresh rosemary leaves. Add about 3 tablespoon of prepared horseradish. Add enough olive oil to make a paste of all this. You should end up with about a half a cup of paste.

 

 

 

Place the roast in a roasting pan, and using your hands, smear the paste on all sides of the roast. Turn the roast rib side down. (That's why the calll it a "standing rib roast"....smile.gif) You can add onions, carrots and celery to the roasting pan if you want. You can also add potatoes if your plan on serving roasted potatoes.

 

 

 

Place the pan in a pre-heated 325 degree oven, and roast about 20 minutes per pound. An instant read thermometer should read 115-120 degrees when stuck in the middle. (That is for a bit less than medium rare). When it reaches that temp, remove from the oven and place the roast on a cutting board. Cover with foil and let rest about 15-20 minutes.....the carryover cooking will bring the center to about 125 degrees. If you are doing a large roast (3 ribs or more), you will have a variety of doneness.....medium to medium rare on the ends for folks that like that, and medium rare to rare in the middle for me and Donna. wink.gif....With a 2-rib roast, it will be mostly a bit less than medium rare throughout.

 

 

 

While the roast is resting, remove the veggies from the pan (if you put them in), and toss them or save them in the warm oven to serve as a side. De-glaze the pan with some cabernet or merlot, and a bit of beef broth. Reduce to make an Au Jus.....

 

 

 

Carve the roast, and add any juices from the carving board to your Au Jus.

 

 

 

Serve with the sauce, and a creamy horseradish sauce if you wish.

"You know the Bill of Rights is serving its purpose when it protects things you wish it didn't."

 

"You can no longer be oppressed if you are not afraid anymore - Unknown"

 

SOL Member #174

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Oops, just saw ya said about 10 pounds, so triple my quantities, and for a roast that big, you definately want the low and slow method (i.e. 325 degree oven), unless you have folks that like well-done prime rib......for 10 lbs, you are looking at about 2 1/2- 3 hours in the oven, but start checking it after about 2......

"You know the Bill of Rights is serving its purpose when it protects things you wish it didn't."

 

"You can no longer be oppressed if you are not afraid anymore - Unknown"

 

SOL Member #174

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I use the low temperature method, like Steve. I lightly salt and pepper the roast prior to cooking.

 

About 1 hour before it is done, I peel and slice some potatoes and add them to the pan. While the roast is resting, I turn the oven on broil and move the rack up to brown the potatoes. This makes really, really nice potatoes. But you do have to watch carefully to make sure you don't burn them.

 

Prime Rib is actually quite easy. Just use an accurate thermometer and don't overcook it. For most of the time in the oven, the thermometer won't move much. But when it gets close to being done, the temperature will climb quickly, so pay attention when the temp gets over 100 degrees.

 

I use a digital thermometer, but I don't have a remote probe.

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I just cooked one last night......coated it with a combo of spices.....inserted lots and lots of slivers of garlic into the meat through tiny slits.

 

I cook mine on my grill...it's Weber with 3 zone heating and when you turn the middle zone off the grill acts like a convection oven.....I also do my Turkey here as well. I preheat the grill to 350ish.......put the meat in....with a thermometer inserted of course....cook til thermometer reaches about 130....remove from heat....slice....perfect!!

"Life is Not a Dress Rehearsal!"
Member #1666
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I was just going to post this same question and hoped that you guys would chime in. I picked up an eight and a half pound "hotel style" rib roast today. I guess the ribs are separated by the butcher to make carving easier. Does having a roast this style make a difference in cooking time? I go with the garlic slit method myself, and sometimes will coat a roast with salt ,pepper and flour for a little crust on the outside.I will go with the slow cook method in my electric oven. My in laws like it mooing so would the consensus be 120 degrees for rare? The roast is about 6" high by ten" long. Thanks for any help provided and Happy holidays to the food forum.

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It's unlikely to make any significant difference in the cooking time if the ribs were separated and tied back on.

 

Personally, I go for 125 degrees, not 120, but YMMV. Remember though, it's easier to fix it if it is too rare than if it is too well done...

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It's unlikely to make any significant difference in the cooking time if the ribs were separated and tied back on.

 

Personally, I go for 125 degrees, not 120, but YMMV. Remember though, it's easier to fix it if it is too rare than if it is too well done...

 

 

 

it is a common practice in many restaurants to dip a slab of prime rib in hot au jus to cook it more well done

 

you can always cook meat a little more, you can't uncook it

 

 

i used to use 125 degrees as my benchmark temp, i now use 120, and my tastes have not changed

 

i have not tried the low and slow method on a prime rib to date....maybe next time, cuz the hot and fast made it a just a little bit tough last time out, but it could ahve been the meat itself, although it looked pretty good

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I think Dave got a "semi-boneless" rib roast, which is what you get now a-days most anywhere you go......this simply means that the chine bone at the bottom of the ribs was cut off by the butcher with a band saw, making it possible to cut the roast between the ribs without using a hammer and a cleaver.....wink.gif

 

 

 

Makes no difference in the cooking time..........

"You know the Bill of Rights is serving its purpose when it protects things you wish it didn't."

 

"You can no longer be oppressed if you are not afraid anymore - Unknown"

 

SOL Member #174

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not sure if I am mistaken, but i think they were completely removed and tied back on with string.i will go with 120 degrees. I think they cut it up this way so you dont have to carve between the ribs for your slices. I think my roast is 5 ribs.

 

Very common. Just treat it as normal...

 

Lots of good advice above, just make sure you monitor the cooking time carefully, as you should with any larger cut. There is tremendous variation between ovens, and the window between 120 and 130 can be faster than you think.

 

With a coupple o dinks even faster wink.gif

 

-spence

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