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TimS

Random Images III

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If you post in this thread, you are agreeing to these guidelines:

 

 

 

1. Please keep the pictures in good taste, appropriate for both men and women, respectful of both men and women, and appropriate for public display on a fishing website that welcomes members from 13 years old and up. If the picture you are planning to post is likely to cause someone embarassment if their wife or husband or daughter or boss or child should happen to look at their computer - then do not post it.

 

 

 

2. Please keep the pictures relatively random - I don't want to decide for you what that number is, but I also don't want to see an entire page of the same thing in a random images thread.

 

 

 

3. Forum leaders and administrators may remove a picture that they feel is inappropriate - it may be removed with or without notification to the poster - if you feel your picture was removed unecessarily - contact me in private, supply me with the image or a link to the image -- I will make a judgement call. **At no time will anyone be allowed to publicly question administrative actions in this thread - read that again please.

 

 

 

4. There won't be any repeated public warnings - you may or may not recieve any warning - the rules are clear, we've been over this before, if you are unsure whether something is appropriate or not, simply do not post it.

 

 

 

If you have read the above and agree to these terms - then please enjoy this thread. If you do not agree with those terms, don't post in this thread. Thanks smile.gif

 

 

 

TimS

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National Wildlife's 35th annual photo contest winners

 

 

 

1st,grand prize winner

 

 

 

Kim Steininger

 

 

Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania

 

 

 

"I took this picture right before I ducked," says Steininger. On a bird-watching trip in Ontario, Canada, last winter, the network administrator noticed that one of the great gray owls she was photographing was staring back at her. "I didn't think anything of it until it started flying at me," she says. Before getting out of the way, Steininger captured this digital photo with a 500mm telephoto lens.

 

 

 

525

 

 

 

 

photo #2

 

 

 

Victor S. Lamoureux

 

 

Vestal,
New Y ork

 

 

 

Lamoureux, a high school biology teacher, knows frogs. So when he went frog-watching with his son and niece at a nearby pond and spotted two male green frogs clinging to each other, he knew it was something unusual. Then my son said, "Dad, Dad, look-there are three frogs!" says Lamoureux. As it turned out, there actually were four: three males in a conga line behind one put-upon female. Lamoureux raced back to his house with the kids in tow, and returned to take this digital image with a 180mm macro lens.

 

 

 

525

 

 

 

 

#3

 

 

 

Ray G. Foster

 

 

 

Salem, Oregon

 

 

 

Ducks, not hummingbirds, were on Foster's mind when he settled down behind a photo blind near a pond in southern Oregon. "I wasn't having any duck luck so I decided to focus on this hummingbird," says the paper mill worker. He used a 300mm lens to take this unusual photo of a rufous hummingbird collecting fibers from a cattail--presumably to build a nest.

 

 

 

525

 

 

 

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Kevin Doxstater

Port Orange, Florida

While photographing water birds in Florida's Fort DeSoto Park, Doxstater spotted a long-billed curlew hundreds of feet away in the middle of a tidal marsh. Doxstater took off his socks and shoes and slowly waded into the marsh, making digital photos along the way using a 500mm lens and a 1.4x teleconverter. In the end, he was rewarded with this close-up shot of the curlew in the middle of a crab lunch.

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Craig Hilton

Lakewood, Colorado

On a trip to Utah's Bear River, Hilton was surprised to see a pair of hungry American white pelicans herding several carp-bigger than the birds' bills-into the shallows. Hilton captured the moment with a digital camera and a 200-400mm zoom lens. "What I love about the picture is the expression on the pelicans' faces. You know they're having a good time," he says.

525

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