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FishinFEEver

OBX Rec Limits

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Don't want to start trouble here, but I'm sure some debate will arise from this.

 

Does anyone else agree that since a bulk of the migratory breeding stock of striped bass spends the winter off North Carolina waters shouldn't some restrictive harvest limits be put into place from December to February? I am reminded of the slaughter pictures a certain charter captain posted on this board last winter (who is also pushing for the EEZ to be opened so he can kill even more and bigger stripers upck.gif )

Wouldn't a true slot limit of 24"-32" (and if they ***** give them one trophy over 42") make more sense than allowing boats to go and limit out 2 fish per person often over 20 lbs. Or drop it to a one fish limit over 28", of course I wouldn't put it past those gusy to cull their catch upck.gif

The bass are sitting ducks for boat guys over the winter, right before they go and spawn. A chimpanzee could motor up to a birdpplay and drop a bucktail into the melee coming up with 25 lber.

It makes me sick to see pictures of 10 or more dead 20+ fish that are only a few months away from putting those good genes into the population.

 

Does anyone agree or am I wrong here?

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I agree and diagree. Been there done that. I would like to see differant size limits all over. The mind set down there is differant. Stop and think about all the bass we kill in NJ in the spring and early summer in Raritan bay. While it does upset me from time to time to see the pictures from Cato and crew its still a long way from what happens up here. I've fished NC from oregon inlet quite a few times and can honestly said I've released quite a few large bass. Its always been on a private boat and usually cato and devin have been close by.They do it for their charters. I do it for myself and my buddy and have no one to anwser to.

Maybe i'm way out of line. I dont see any easy anwsers.I remember back in the 70's when there were no bass in the obx.Then it was channel bass, NC held these fish in high reguards. Then they started to disappear and limits were made.The stripers are a gold mine for them now.They will learn you can't just keep killing. Sadly it will be to late.

We need to keep close watch in our backyard.These fish are to valuable to kill each and everyone we catch.

Please dont get me wrong, I see where your coming from and I agree.I just wonder though what our charter fleet would be doing this weekend if the bass wintered off NJ.

Personally i would like to see a limit of 1 fish per day any size.That would let the guy who wants to eat it , eat it and the guy who catchs a 50 keep it. I just think that might save alot of fish. This whole slot thing up here made me sick, people made alot of money and we got alot more bass fisherman, and of course all the dead bass We'll see next year.

I know i pissed someone off and i did'nt mean to. gotta run now and load my truck and see if I can catch some bass tommorrow.

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A dead fish is a dead fish. Why should North Carolina be subject to more stringent restrictions than other Atantic states. If we need to further restrict the killing of stipers all states should be effected. Are more stripers harvested out of North Carolina than New Jersey, New York, Maryland or Virginia. I think not. Even though the fish concentrate in NC, there is not that much pressure compared to the rest of the mid-atlantic and northeast, and many of the winter days are unfishable. Just my opinion on the matter.

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HR,

I completely agree limits need to change everywhere also. Th slot limit made me sick from the start. The problem with the one fish any size limit is culling. I worry that people will start by throwing an 18"er in the box and progressively work their way up to a 30".

 

I have nothing against the state of North Carolina, I just feel that wherever the bass winter, be it NC, NJ or Ireland for all I care, they should entertain stricter limits since this is the most concentrated the striped bass are all year, and many LARGE.

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Let me see I just did a query on recreational harvest in state territorial seas by state. Those are the fish that they harvest in NC in the winter of which you are concerned. Just to get a feel for the numbers.

 

DE 4,700

ME 19,000

MA 66,000

NH 3,037

NJ 175,000

NY 131,000

NC 34,000

RI 17,000

VA 47,000

 

The numbers are number of fish. They do not include inshore state waters. So for all state waters you get the following.

 

CT 51,000

DE 29,000

ME 72,000

MD 282,000

MA 309,000

NH 13,000

NJ 416,000

NY 202,000

NC 60,000

RI 78,000

VA 321,000

 

Now everyone may not be able to agree that all of the numbers are that good but I would say that they show trends.

 

And don't even get me started on recreational bykill. Pick your release mortality here is the released alive numbers by state. The guys at ASMFC use 8% mortality.

 

CT 697,000

DE 115,000

ME 1,392,000

MD 2,929,000

MA 5,719,00

NH 238,000

NJ 715,000

NY 588,000

NC 530,000

RI 530,000

VA 707,000

 

So who should take the cutback because THEY are killing to many fish?

 

BTW the Chespeake Bay harvest both recreational and commercial is looking at a 20% cut next year.

 

Tom

 

PS IMO If you really want to look at overall who is doing the most damage consider who is killing the most BIOMASS through combined harvest and bykill.

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IMO If you really want to look at overall who is doing the most damage consider who is killing the most BIOMASS through combined harvest and bykill.

 

Can you say "Omega Protein?"

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I just noticed that the number released alive for MA has the right commas but is missing a zero.

 

Was -- MA 5,719,00

 

Shoud be -- MA 5,719,000

 

Oh and there are lots of issues surrounding this thing called fisheries management. I was just addressing the perception of who is harvesting what.

 

Tom

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Tom- Just wondering. How did you go from these numbers:

 

CT 51,000

DE 29,000

ME 72,000

MD 282,000

MA 309,000

NH 13,000

NJ 416,000

NY 202,000

NC 60,000

RI 78,000

VA 321,000

 

 

To these numbers:

 

CT 697,000

DE 115,000

ME 1,392,000

MD 2,929,000

MA 5,719,00

NH 238,000

NJ 715,000

NY 588,000

NC 530,000

RI 530,000

VA 707,000

 

I thought NJ had the proud distinction of killing most fish?

 

 

Just wondering.

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The data is from the NMFS recreational data site. While many may object to the numbers they are what the managment guys use.

 

So the first list is A+B1 data. "A" is fish kept. "B1" is fish released dead.

 

The second list is "B2" data. Fish released alive.

 

So for instance if you use a release mortality of 8% and 1,000,000 fish released alive the number of fish killed is 80,000.

 

Tom

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The data is from the NMFS recreational data site. While many may object to the numbers they are what the managment guys use.

 

So the first list is A+B1 data. "A" is fish kept. "B1" is fish released dead.

 

The second list is "B2" data. Fish released alive.

 

So for instance if you use a release mortality of 8% and 1,000,000 fish released alive the number of fish killed is 80,000.

 

Tom

 

Gotcha- now I understand. Those Mass guys are a nasty bunch. Although I think the released alive #'s for NJ might not include those supposedly released alive while fishing in the EEZ. Who would admitt to doing that. Hmmmmm.

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Does anyone agree or am I wrong here?

 

I would vote "wrong". Just look at the numbers Tom posted. And I suspect a fair number of the fish caught in NC are the resident Albemarle Sound Managment Area "twinkies" caight in the sping and fall open seasons.

 

Pre-spawn, post-spawn I just can't see the diffence. The female you kill in the summer won't spawn next year so they are prespawn as well.

 

And I can assure you there are many more weather days on Outer Banks in the winter than weather days in the summer up north. There really is not that much pressure on the fish by the NC boaters in the winter. Three nasty inlets with unpredicatable weather and cold water.

 

Cato and Devon are an exception so don't equate their dead fish photo's with the norm. For many of the charters, these will be the only two bass they kill all year.

 

I'll go for a 2 fish a year rule. I've taken my two this year and won't kill any more. John M and some other who visit in the winter are spreading the word about the nature of the bigger fish we are killing and we're seeing more fish released.

 

Wonderful to see all the concern for the fish now that folks in another state get a brief shot at them. upck.gif

 

Oh yea. There is not a scarity of trucks with NJ and NY plates on the Outer Banks this time of year. About 40% of SW anglers in NC are from out-of-state.

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