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Wishing I was Fishing

Nails and Pressure treated wood

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The new ACQ treated lumber is very corrosive.

 

You need to look for fasteners that say "Approved for use with ACQ..." I think Ramset make pins that are approved.

 

If this is a wall plate, any nail that touches the plate has to non- corroding as well.

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Gadbals is correct!

I use stainless these days. They say double galvanized is okay, but I live at the beach and for a few $$ more I'd rather give my customers peace of mind. Actually they get quality and I get the piece of mind.

You could bolt the plate to the floor with stainless bolts and zinc/lead shields. You wouldnt need a mess of bolts so it should be relatively easy to implement such an overbuilt wall.

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Thought the new pressure treated process involves copper.an copper nails work.I know its not the same anymore an most old hangers an nail systems are obsolete.

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Thought the new pressure treated process involves copper.an copper nails work.I know its not the same anymore an most old hangers an nail systems are obsolete.

 

Very true, but you ever try driving a copper nail into treated lumber? eek.gif

If you know where I can get em for my nailer, please let me know. That would look awesome on a cedar deck!

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Aren't there health risks with having pressure-treated inside the house - or is that just with the older stuff?

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CD

I just did a search and I can't find them, but 10 + years ago we used copper ringed siding nails for a hitachi gun HappyWave.gif

 

Fanciest ***** plant ever build IMHO eek.gif

 

Check some high end roofing supply houses wink.gif

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Aren't there health risks with having pressure-treated inside the house - or is that just with the older stuff?

 

From what i know, the old PT CCA has arsenic in it, and the newer acq does not. As far as in the house use is concerned, PT lumber is used only for Sill plates sitting on a cement floor, then enclosed in a wall so I don't see the hazard, but maybe I'm wrong.

 

As far as outside, I guess the the older PT cca stuff is still a potential hazard, ie picking up a splinter or such.

 

Maybe some more experienced can give a better answer.

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Yeah the old stuff was copper arsenate pressure applied to syp. The slivers were/are a problem, seemed like every couple of months some worker at a lumberyard would have a swollen hand due to not getting a sliver out right away. But I dont ever remember hearing of any problem from PT or Wamonized lumber and anyting airborne or harmful from breathing the air inside of a house, thought any concerns were due to PT that was water saturated and leaching of the chemicals over time-exterior problems.

 

I'd hate to hear there were interior problems with it since its a rare house built in the last 20 years that doesnt have at least PT sill plate inside it.

 

The stuff had its uses, especially with the inherent strength of yellow pine over spruce.

 

I lilke the sounds of those gun nails too....though I wonder if the ones referred to were merely copper coated or plated.

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Put a bead of construction adhesive under each plate and nail it any way you can.By the time the nails are gone the construction adhesive will have set. biggrin.gif The industry still hasn't decided what to do with the new P.T. I've heard that stainless nails will disolve too.

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