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BrianBM

A Question about Off Road Packages

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Maybe I'm just dense, but how do you increase the clearance under the transaxle without increasing the tire size?

 

Guess I'm dense too. The H1 and new Jeep Rescue have massive wheels and tires - isn't that to get the diff's up and out of the way?

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Guess I'm dense too. The H1 and new Jeep Rescue have massive wheels and tires - isn't that to get the diff's up and out of the way?

 

Aside from larger tires, the only way to increase the clearance is to REPLACE the entire axle assembly. If you can weld or have Jesse James as your neighbor, Volvo portal axles with give you 18 inches inder the diff with 33" tires. But forget about going over 70 on the highway. They only come geared in 5.97 and 7.14. Unless you put 44's on them... wink.gif

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Just a side note regarding stiffer shocks and springs...if you plan on driving your truck offroad on uneven terrain in real mud and snow...don't use them.... they dramatically reduce your traction and ability to control the vehicle...the reasons are many, but this is the jist of it..."When a wheel droops even an inch or two on uneven terrain, that wheel is "unloaded" -- ie its ground contact force is reduced -- in direct proportion to the stiffness of the spring and anti-roll bar (if fitted). Any loss in ground contact force reduces available traction at the wheel in question. With an open differential on the axle, traction is lost at both wheels simultaneously"

The downside is you have to deal with more body roll on the highway with softer shocks....but if you dont drive your truck like a race car as others pointed out, it is no big deal.

Also...if you end up using mud terrain or commercial traction tires...they typically have a stiffer sidewall which magnifies the effect described above.

 

Add stiffer springs, ditch the rear roll bar, and let the rear flex. wink.gif Once you remove the limiting factors like swaybars and short travel shocks, the "drooping" wheel, while not fully loaded is still providing traction. Once a wheel gets in the air on an open diff, you're done.

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Maybe I'm just dense, but how do you increase the clearance under the transaxle without increasing the tire size?

 

You don't-the clearance under the transaxle is 11.8". The air suspension allows you to lift the vehicle up to achieve maximum clearance, or lower it down for stability on the road. There are six different level settings, plus the shocks are adjustable also. You can adjust the system maually, or leave it in auto-mode. In auto mode, it sets itself for the conditions and adjusts itself automatically at speed. At 80 mph it hunkers down another inch, and I think at 110 it drops all the way down. In manual, you can drop it down for granny to get in, then jack it up to take her four-wheeling.

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I'll put my van up against a quigly any day. Iv'e a frind in toms river with one and he hates the fuel milage 6 to 10 mpg. I get 15 to 20. Except for the rear diff I think I am at 15 ins. clearance. I'll have to measure it tomorrow.

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Kneel,

 

I hear ya...fortunately anti-sway bars weren't even an option on my truck, and I have almost a full 14" of wheel articulation....stock...can't say I have ever had one in the air. smile.gif

The problem with today's soccer mom suv's is that even with the "off-road" package...the anti' sway bars are usually standard...couple that with stiffer shocks and springs and you get even more of a car like ride with a bone jarring off-road experience with reduced control and traction.

I would venture to say if you have a coil sprung suspension, that is soft enough, you won't ever need to add an aftermarket diff locker. More of a chance of sending too much power to the wrong place and snapping something off miles away from the nearest road.

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