FishAgain

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About FishAgain

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  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    fishing, hunting, bird watching
  1. A serious question; how are these deer different then the herds of say 50 years ago? Not referring the the population explosion
  2. I like the union approach here especially the threatening children part. Really speaks well for the union-thug mentality
  3. Union dispute slows work at vital western port to a crawl By Dan Springer ·Published April 08, 2014· FoxNews.com Facebook0Twitter415Gplus0 At first glance, operations at the Port of Portland might look normal. Trucks come and go. Containers are loaded and unloaded. But upon closer inspection, it's clear the normally efficient system is moving like molasses. Crane operators hover over a container for up to a minute before hooking and moving it. Once the container is set down, the crane worker backs up right in the path of the next truck and sits there for another minute. It all adds up to lost time and lost productivity at the busiest port in Oregon, a state where 500,000 jobs are dependent on international trade. The work slowdown has been going on for a year and is threatening thousands of jobs and the region's economy. It's the result of a war between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the terminal operator, ICTSI. The company's CEO claims the reason they're still fighting is the union wants to oust the company and return to the days when the port was run by a pseudo-government agency. "The union wants to put ICTSI out of business in Portland," the company's CEO Elvis Ganda said. "And I think they want to see things returned to a situation where they can dictate how the operation runs." Before ICTSI took over Terminal 6, the Port of Portland ran the docks. Ganda said the longshoremen are working at a snail's pace because they're still angry over a recent dispute over jobs. The work in question involves plugging and unplugging refrigerated containers. Traditionally, the jobs belonged to electricians in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). The ILWU tried to take that work -- and eventually, the work slowdown became so severe, Democratic Gov. John Kitzhaber stepped in and negotiated a deal taking the jobs from the electricians and giving them to the ILWU. But even after that apparent win for the longshoremen, the port is still at a crawl, which is costing shippers and trucking companies lost time and money. "It's costing us thousands upon thousands of dollars," said John Lawrence of Western Container. "Drivers are having to sit at the port six, eight hours to do one turn. They're not making any money." The slowdown did have one noteworthy exception. Workers were told Feb. 2 they could leave as soon as they unloaded a ship. Apparently, that was good reason to pick up the pace to finally move the normal number of containers. Kitzhaber spelled out his frustration in a letter to the ILWU, writing, "I am dismayed to see that recent production levels at Terminal 6 continue to be below historical averages -- except for Super Bowl Sunday." Since then, there's only been more tension. The union seems to be getting even more militant. The National Labor Relations Board accused the longshoremen in nearby Vancouver, Wash., of threatening the children of United Grain employees, including the threatened rape of one manager's daughter. The union's alleged actions, apparently a response to a lockout, also involved injuring and hurling racial slurs at security guards. Businesses which are dependent on trade are watching and worried. "It goes all the way through our economy and it's the base of our economy here," said Sandra McDonough of the Portland Business Alliance. The ILWU did not return numerous requests from Fox News for comment. In published stories about the labor dispute, the union has been critical of the Port of Portland for paying shipping lines a $4 million subsidy to keep calling on Portland. Port officials say it's not a public subsidy, but rather a necessary incentive with the money coming from port revenue, not taxpayers.
  4. So eloquent and so true
  5. Didn't we call Frank that for awhile. Hey Frank!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  6. These celeb-types who come from nuevo money, party their brains out, sleep all day then OD leave me indifferent
  7. Never reloaded anything but 12 ga. skeet loads. I could load a bos for $1-2 per. That was a while ago. Now I buy AA factories and ignore the expense. I don't have that kind of time any more
  8. So the whole airline shuts down because of one employee group? Seems reasonable if you are in a union frame of mind. Otherwise, FY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  9. Weber gas hands down. Nothing comes close. Long lasting, repairable when things finally wear out
  10. The answer is the P220 I had mine for twenty years, it shoots like it was built just for me. Go get one!!!!!!!!!!!
  11. Two words "Sig Sauer"
  12. Do you really believe that? C'mon you can't be that stupid, just because it doesn't use gun powder doesn't mean it isn't lethal
  13. How much?
  14. I thought that guy in the video was a one-off until I saw related videos after it was finished. Where do these morons come from and how do we keep them from reproducing. I mean seriously looking down the barrel of a loaded gun. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  15. I won't spend a dime in any of his dumps.