fishfood

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Everything posted by fishfood

  1. I've been using the Quikrete version of FloCoat (called Re-Cap) to re-level and resurface a 22x12 slab porch. It is kicking my butt. I try to be consistent in my mixing, but it seems like each bag has a mind of it's own when it comes to spreading evenly with the squeegee. I've been doing small batches between 2 and 6 bags at a time. Today was my 3rd attempt, and thought I finally did a nice job. But what looked nice wet turned out pretty shoddy when it dried. I have a new respect for people that do nice concrete finishing work. Mine would probably look better if I'd have let my kid slap it on like finger paint. It's like a drunken concrete monster puked on my deck. Good news is, I'm doing thin coats and can always build another thin coat to fix the last. It's not exactly cheap concrete to go all trial-and-error with, but that's what I've gotten myself into.
  2. If you google "traditional chesapeake bay fishing grounds", some guy took the time to overlay all the reef/hump/lump coordinates from the maryland DNR sight onto the map. I just started exploring the area out of Wilson Point Park last fall and use this as my main resource.
  3. I mentioned earlier in this thread that I was considering a PVC pipe hydroponic setup. After a bit of research, I decided to pivot and just do the Kratky method in mason jars. Spent about $50-60 up front for mason jars, net cups, rock wool, black chalkboard paint, and a nutrient mix. It'll be a few years before I'll need to replenish the rock wool and nutrients...the rest were a one-time purchase. Fun little project with the kids. Already had a light setup on chains so I can adjust the height. Currently doing 3 types of lettuce and Swiss chard. Have had two salad nights with the greens so far. No slugs, bugs, dirt to worry about. Just quick rinse and spin and it's good to go. Started the seeds in late March. This is right after moving to the jars on 04/20 This is before first harvest on 05/07. Took all but the small inner leaves... they grew back quickly and we got a 2nd, larger harvest on 05/18. Should get 2-3 more over the next month, and then supposedly they start to get bitter.
  4. Nice! Do those SS models not have the table mounted propane adapter and igniter? I've got a blue performer and matching blue gasser (both cheap CL finds) but that green is my favorite weber color.
  5. Got to cook and eat both snakehead and wild ramps for the first time yesterday. Kept it simple...both got olive oil, S&P and went on the grill, with a few ramps sliced for a pan lemon/butter sauce. Overcooked the fish a touch, but it was still pretty good. The ramps and ramp sauce were excellent.
  6. I'm gonna put a composite deck over my concrete slab, once I address a few puddling issues. I have about 5" of space to the door thresholds to work with so height shouldn't be an issue. Gilbey's recent deck project inspired me to do use a double picture frame look. Seems like standard way to do this is putting 2x4 sleepers on their long edge with PVC spacers, like the picture below. Easy enough. What do you think my best bet is for supporting the picture frame on the sides? Normal blocking seems awkward due to 2x4s sitting on their long edge, although I guess I could use 4" or longer screws. Or could I just plop down 2x12" for the side sleepers an call it a day? Is a 2x12 any more or less likely to want to warp than some blocked 2x4s? One other thought I had was to save a few trees and rip a bunch of 2x4s in half, so I would lay the sleepers on their 1.5" side and treat the more like normal joists. Whichever setup I decide, my plan is to using a hammer drill and tapcon screws to secure to the slab, unless someone has a better suggestion. Thanks in advance for any insight.
  7. You don't like my unpainted sill? haha. Both doors and the kitchen window that open to that deck are in terrible shape (rotting, drafty) and all are getting replaced this summer.
  8. I honestly don't think the current step up from the deck ever even registered with me as a trip hazard or annoyance. Is it the smaller 1-2" steps that trip people up, cause they don't see it? Or you just like decks level with floors? Out of curiosity, if you were raising the level here, what would you be aiming to get level with? I probably misspoke when I said 5" to the threshold...it's actually 5" to the top of that brick, and then another 1.5" to the threshold. But in my mind I just needed to keep it below the brick. (I'm not sure which prior owner was the sadist that painted the concrete that pinkish-tan color....but I've been grinding it off the past few days and am not having a great time)
  9. That's a good point, but I'd like to keep the added height to 3-3.25". The slab is 20" above grade and I want to deck level below 23.25 for 3 steps down at <7.75" risers
  10. I have some raised beds made of composite decking, and some made of box-store landscape pavers. Both were being used for other purposes when I bought the house so I repurposed them at no cost. You can often pick up bricks or pavers on craiglist for cheap or free if you want to go that route. Don't have to be too handy to stack bricks/pavers in a rectangle. My suggestion for lower cost soil is to avoid the big-box-store bags and pick up bulk from a mulch/compost supplier. In southern Chester County there should be plenty of options. I'm in northern Cecil Md and between Cecil, Chester and Lancaster there's plenty of old-school home and garden spots. Cecil waste management might have cheap or free compost for sale as well. You can get fancy with pH amendments and what not, but our neck of the woods has pretty good soil anyway, and I've always had good luck just by combining compost with what I dig out of the yard.
  11. I used to slice meat at the carving station of a buffet, and this is how we quickly browned up slices for people that wanted it more well done. Works well.
  12. Golfed on Friday with the greens set up for covid with the pool noodles in the cups, set about 1/4" below the grade of the green. Buddy's tee-shot is dead-on for a 165 yard par 3 shot. Lands on the front of the green, rolls up, clinks the flag-stick, ends up 4" behind the cup. Pretty good odds it'd have dropped without the foam in the cup. Bad timing for a once/twice in a lifetime shot.
  13. I usually spin chickens outside on my old weber gas grill rotisserie, but this does a good job with a little 4lb bird. I had never even heard of this appliance company before. It might end up being a piece of crap, but so-far-so-good a few weeks in. Between cooking and home projects, I'm doing my part to stimulate the economy with new gadget and tool purchases.
  14. Instead of replacing a toaster oven with an air fryer, just get a new toaster oven with an air fryer (rack and convection fan) setting. We just got the one below to replace a 15-year old toaster oven. It's great so far. Can do 6 slices of toast, rotisserize a whole chicken, crisp up wings nicely, and act as a dehydrator for jerky. We use it for something or other pretty much daily.
  15. My last boat had an 1988 Suzuki 2-stroke with 85-90psi on all 3 cylinders and that thing still screamed wide-open. Before that I had a early 80's johnson 25hp what ran fine with even lower compression. A lot of older 2-strokes (both american and japanese) don't have really high compression. As long as one cylinder isn't way out of whack compared to the rest they'll run. I moved from a 17' CC to a 22' walkaround last year. The WA is a much more pleasant ride in cold or windy conditions, but I'd run another 17' CC in a heartbeat (especially compared to no boat). Before that I fished out of a 15' old town canoe that I rigged a trolling motor on, and a 12' walmart kayak. If you love being on the water, any boat is going to be better than no boat. Even moreso if you're somewhat handy and can fix/maintain things yourself. If you're hesitant about being on the water, and need to pay someone else every time something minor comes up, you might find yourself in the "boat = break out another thousand" or "2nd best day of a boaters life is when he sells his boat" club. If that's the case, a friend with a boat is the way to go.
  16. When I was shopping for Grady's last winter there were older (think mid-late 90s) 208 Overnighters with 2-stokes to be found in the $10-12k range. Same with Pursuit walkaround from similar years. But as others have mentioned, plenty of other options like SeaPro, Proline, key west, sea ox where you might find newer options for the same $. If you're trying to stick to a budget, I think it's easier to look at everything available and then do your homework on the motors, rather than looking for a specific boat/motor combo. Plenty of online resources (both from dealers, and person-to-person) to seach by style, length, and price, and start to get a ballpark idea of your options. Plus just go walk around marinas and look at different setups. In the 19-21' range, cabins do take up usable deck space, so some models are pretty tight for fishing and summer boating activities. With curtains, some center-consoles and dual consoles can be buttoned up to keep you relatively out of the elements for winter boating. I ended up with a walkaround cause my kids love the cabin and we occasionally overnight, but overall I prefer center consoles.
  17. Doing a 2nd batch of yogurt today, playing with some extracts I had on hand. Vanilla, lemon, almond, and rum yogurt.
  18. Had a quart of whole milk sitting in the fridge, so tried sous vide yogurt the other day. 1) Milk in mason jars with lids (not sealed, just loosely tightened), into bath and set at 180. Left for an hour. (denatures proteins) 2) Turn machine off and let jars sit in the bath for another 75 minutes or so. (to cool the milk so it doesn't kill the active cultures) 3) Pull a tablespoon or so from each jar of milk into a bowl, add an equal part store-yogurt, mix, and distribute back to mason jars. (store yogurt needs to have active culture) 4) Stir, turn the machine back on set to 110, and let go for 5-7 hours to incubate/ferment. Move jars to fridge overnight. Stupid easy...nothing really to clean up since everything is done right in the jars. About 5 minutes active work, and would be just as easy to scale up volume. Going to keep doing it and tinker around with adding flavors in step 2. Vanilla, citrus zest, etc. Or flavors like garlic or curry for savory yogurt sauces/dips for grilled/roasted meats.
  19. The red cups were just the first thing I bought/tried when I built my coop last spring. Once winter came and temps dropped, I couldn't figure out how to properly insulate the pvc to keep it from freezing, so I bought a heated water bucket with the horizontal nips. I like that style better, so I'm gonna order some and swap out my cups. I like this system cause I'm lazy and don't want to have to clean things any more than necessary.
  20. The heated bucket we use in the winter has horizontal watering nipples that the chickens seem to prefer. I might ditch the cups and install these instead.
  21. The pressure from the water in the elevated barrel keeps the pipes filled, and the chickens peck at the little yellow actuator in the red cup that fills the cup with water. Top off the barrel with a hose and it lasts at least 3-4 weeks (with 9 hens) until you need to fill it again. The red cups just screw into the PVC and like to develop a slow-drip leak, so I have to pull that section off and re-seat them with some sealer from time to time.
  22. Also use a rain barrel (or hose barrel, I guess), but with those red cup waterers you can get at tractor supply. Works great for 3 seasons...but we switch to a 2 gallon heated water bucket in the winter.
  23. Thanks. Most of the raptors around us are osprey and bald eagles, and they're fat with fish from the bay most of the time. Still, we occasionally see a red tailed hawk around, so we only free range them if we're outside with them. Only one we've lost so far has been our own dumb*ss dog, when the kids forgot to close the gate to his fence.
  24. Having a bunch of hens beats weeding and tilling the garden by hand.
  25. Anyone in here mess around with hydroponics at all? I didn't start any seeds indoors this year thinking I'd be too busy with kids sports....and here we are with nothing but time. I've got a bunch of PVC laying around and just starting some research on what I'll need to make it happen. I have a whole bunch of worm castings, so I'm thinking of incorporating worm tea into the nutrients somehow.