atv223

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About atv223

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  • What I do for a living:
    Engineer
  1. I was really on which one to get. I ended up with the MH. Reason being, I was looking for something to use for togging on charter boats and wanted something to handle more lead. I don’t know how much kayak used that trevala/Avet will get. Since I didn’t get the Avet MC version it’s mostly a vertical jigging rig. I love Shimano but they’ve abandoned the sub-5000 Series saltwater market for some reason. 4000 and 3000 series are my most used size reels.
  2. I really don't like the actions of any Ugly Stiks. I own a bunch of them for the kids and other people to use, but they are the last rods I own that I want to fish with. I think it's difficult to find a really good rod for under $100 these days. I agree with Buddha, the sweet spot for rods and reels is between around $120 and $200. Less then that and you are compromising more and it's just bling/man jewelry. If I had to pick a single rod to own, hands down, St. Croix TSRS70M Triumph Surf Rod. It's my number on goto rod that does everything well with fantastic action. Even though it's a surf rod, I don't find the butt too long for the kayak at all. It retails for about $120, Dick's Sporting Goods even carries them.
  3. I just picked up a Trevala S (C4S) to pair with my Avet SXJ. I haven't fished with it yet, but the rod feel awesome! though the butt may prove to be a bit long for the kayak. I'll be pulling up some Tog Saturday with it!
  4. I have 3 Offshore Angler Ocean Master (Bass Pro Brand) Travel Rods, 2 spinning and 1 casting. They are all great rods and I'll use them even when I don't need a travel rod. They also are great on the kayak, because I can easily store the 3 piece rods below deck. Keep in mind these are 7' rods, not exactly surf rods.
  5. I'd love to go, but I'm too busy with work at the moment. Good luck everyone!
  6. Some vehicles don't lend themselves to this rear loading technique. I considered it long and hard before I spent the $$ on a Hullavator. My 4Runner is high so the angle is bad. More importantly, it has a big rear spoiler that would have to carry the full load during this maneuver (I don't think it would hold up over time) and the factory rack is so far forward it further complicate this. The other bonus of the Hullavator people miss is that you do all the strapping while the kaya is conveniently on the side of the vehicle. No climbing around like a monkey to strap it down.
  7. Hullavator is SOOO worth it. I always say, Hullavator, Drysuit and Wheeleez the most ridiculously expensive things in kayak fishing that are worth the money, they are kind of like a pedal kayak. No one wants to spend the money, but after struggling with other options, they ultimately do and always say "wow, what was I waiting for?" I may add PLB, but I just hope to never need to use it. Back on the hullavator, here is an added tip. It can still be a struggle to lift the kayak off the ground and then into the Hullavator. I made up a set of PVC Kayak stands. I first put the kayak in those and then when it's already waist high, It's a LOT easier to lift it into the hullavator. I only wish you could load the hullavator one end of the kayak at a time, but it has to go in all at once.
  8. If you are just looking for a bulkhead to prevent things from sliding around and not flotation, I've seen people do some cool things with coroplast (plastic corrugated "cardboard)
  9. One thing about this video was that he was being towed out the rigs, not under his own propulsion. I've towed kayak before and they tend to nose dive and not react like they do under normal circumstances. I'm sure between the towing and the large cooler on the front any leak was exacerbated.
  10. A PLB functions just like an EPIRB once deployed. The main difference is that an EPIRB deploys automatically when your boat sinks while a PLB must be manually deployed (it won't go off if it get's wet) It's one time use and it does have test buttons to validate that it's working without calling for help. You can also use it on land or anywhere, so if you do anything in the upland back country it's an added safety measure there as well. The battery is guaranteed for 5 years and I think you can send it in for a replacement. Yes, I carry all 3 on my PFD along with a blunt tip emergency knife. None of it interferes with me fishing or pedaling. The phone is in a thin case, on the inside of the PFD so no issue there. The PLB and Radio do add a bit of bulk on the outside and if they were to prevent me from reentry, I can easily take them off if need be. I would rather have a been of extra stuff on me then it in the kayak if I were separated from it.
  11. I wear a dry suit this time of year and pfd always. Also carry a hand bilge pump, wear my cell phone around my neck in a waterproof bag/case and have a waterproof floating VHF radio attached to me. Last year I decided my life was worth the extra $300 and bought a personal locater beacon. If my cell phone fails and no one hears by VHF radio, I have the PLB to call as a last measure that would help rescuers pinpoint you quickly in a big ocean. I really think more people should carry them, but $300 is a hard for people to swallow, spending it on something they hope never to use. It's worth the piece of mind to me.
  12. My one valve was frozen so I took the core out and replaced it. However, it was then leaking and wouldn't hold air. I pulled the core back out and put a very small dab of silicone grease, used for plumbing applications, on the two rubber sealing surfaces. That stopped the leaking.
  13. That's not true at all. I create and post a few videos because I like to make them. It also saves the memory and allows me to relive it anytime I want even far in the future. I learned long ago that when you take a hobby and try to make money out of it, it becomes work. I have enough work so no interest in turning something I do to escape work into work. I do respect those that do want to make money on YouTube and I'm thankful that they do so I can watch their videos, it's just not something for me. What's the point of creating anything if you don't share it with people? Do I like it when people watch my videos? Yes, but that's not stoking my ego. I only hope the few people that watch it, enjoy it and get something out of it. I does open me up to criticism which I don't mind when it's constructive or thought provoking but it sucks when it's just people being a$$holes for the sake of it. I recently posted a video of myself crashing in the surf. It's created lots and lots of conversation about techniques, different strategies etc. etc., mostly in a positive way. I'm sure that some new people to our hobby will learn something from that thread both now and long into the future. Had I made that video and not shared it, what a waste it would have been.
  14. Back in the day, Barrell used to recommend cutting a piece of Half inch or so think foam sheet to the inside shape of the hatch lid and sticking it in there with spray glue. That way you were guaranteed to have the edge of the hatch connect with the foam as a seal, alignment wouldn't be an issue. I saw the same trick used on a video for the TI, but they went further and took the original seal off. Now you have a hard edge connecting with the foam sheet for a better seal.
  15. Let's say you can only take 3 lures with you but have to catch as many different species as possible October in the ocean NJ/NY region. What do you bring?