johnbull

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About johnbull

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    11/09/1966

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  1. For drum or big blues in the fall and spring, look at 17 or 20 lb mono and a shock leader of 15-18 feet of 50 or 60 lb mono. For casting metal for smaller blues and spaniards, go much lighter, 10, 12, or 14 lb mono. This time of the year, there's not much need for the big heaver unless you want to tangle with a shark. Now in a couple of months, it will be different. At that point the drum should be starting to move in with the occasional big bluefish and you'll want a really stout "heaver."
  2. The standing joke is that the best way to catch sharks is to fish for drum. There’s a lot them out there. I caught a 6’6” sandbar shark a couple of years ago with a heavier- took 90 minutes to get in. Lots is sand tigers, sandbars are caught. The spinners were putting on a show at the point last month. I haven’t tried using wire, but think I will next time.
  3. Yes, it’s been part of the Cape Lookout Seashore for many years.
  4. I've never heard of using eels for bait. Can't say they wouldn't work, but like others have said, if they worked for drum you can bet the tackle shops would stock them. Your best bet is to stick with fresh mullet.
  5. The evenings are good as well- say 6-8:30 or so.
  6. I’ve only read about Cobia, never caught one. My impression is that you need to cast the bait a long ways or use a kayak to get the bait far enough. They are typically around in last two weeks of May or first two weeks of June.
  7. Shelly Island only lasted a few months. It was a shoal with waves breaking over it in April of '17, in six weeks it had become a long island 50-100 yards off the point. Over the next several months it gradually "retreated" back into the point proper. We go up there two or three times a year, and it is remarkable how much the shoreline changes over time.
  8. I've got this rod, right now with a Daiwa Saltist 30 BG on it. It's the only true "heaver" I've casted, so I don't have a point of reference. I'm still learning the whole casting a conventional thing right now so I'm casting a little shorter than I want and tend to go too far right. The rod is pretty stout for sure- wrestled in a seven foot shark with it at cape point a couple of years ago.
  9. From all the way up in Duck, Hatteras would be a looong haul- well over an hour. I would look at Oregon Inlet. If you want to go offshore, you'll more than likely be looking at full-day trip. Like others have said- blackfin tuna, dolphin, occasional wahoo, and billfish in the summer.
  10. Good luck kzibell086! In looking back at an earlier post, most folks down there go with a smaller line than 30 lb test. Tackle shops routinely string heavers with 17 or 20 lb. mono, so with a smaller rod you could go with something a little lighter than that. As others have said stop at Hatteras Jacks, farther down the folks at Frank and Frans and Red Drum are very helpful.
  11. Get a simple two hook bottom rig with shrimp or sand fleas and you should be fine for pompano or sea mullet. We'll be in Avon ourselves next week. I'll still toss out the heaver with mullet, but chances are we won't catch anything on it. Casting metal lures- hopkins, stingsilvers, etc.- could get you a bluefish or spanish mackerel too.
  12. I think it sets minimum on mullets as well. That would eliminate a lot of bait mullet that we normally use for drum.
  13. I hope this thing never gets anywhere. It seems like the state is doing its best to incrementally eliminate commercial fishing.
  14. You can catch flounder in the surf, and have caught a few doing it but not a ton. Others are probably better than I am. This time of the year in the surf you could be looking at pompano and sea mullet on bait, or spanish mackerel or blues by casting metal lures.
  15. I grew up "Down East" in Carteret County and down there charcoaled mullets were one of the great delicacies- along with fried soft crabs, fried shrimp, an oyster roast in the dead of winter, ahh- makes my mouth water just to type this. As Ksjohnson put it the Core Sound region down through Cape Lookout and Harker's Island.