The Graveyard Shift

BST Users
  • Content count

    556
  • Joined

  • Last visited

2 Followers

About The Graveyard Shift

  • Rank
    Elite Member

Converted

  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Fly Fishing, Surfcasting, Bass Fishing, and Fishing in general
  • What I do for a living:
    Commercial Real Estate

Profile Fields

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Boston Area

Recent Profile Visitors

1,928 profile views
  1. @bonefishdick First report of 2019. Got a personal best small stream trout yesterday. A brown I presume is wild in a tiny creek near my house. Creek has not been stocked with browns to my knowledege only brook trout. its mainly brook trout but I have caught browns before. Fish are primarily wild the ones that are stocked right next to road get hammered by bait guys. I bushwhack a half to one mile back into creek to fish think I am probably only crazy guy that does it. esitmated fish at 13-14" long and it was immaculate n condition. Hit a size 10 muddler minnow on the swing through a deep pocket with three large submerged rocks in it. Picture of fish from yesterday and two pictures that are representative of the size of the creek.
  2. Hope you find it useful this season
  3. HT We have had two meetings with around 26-30 attendees. There is a dedicated email distribution list thag pushes out updates and there will be one meeting per month all year long. The meeting dates are locked in through July. We will lock in second half of year dates in May. I am currently planing the club fishing outings. First trip will be in June with a goal of 2 trips in June, 1 in July, 1 in August, 2 in September, 1 in October Shoot me your email in PM and I will get you added to club distro.
  4. Hey if your looking for a fun tournament this year consider this event. All the money raised goes to NSRWA which is focused on dam removal and watershed restoration for the North and South Rivers. 2019 South Shore Striper Tournament Join NSRWA for a fun weekend of fishing! Friday, June 7–Sunday, June 9, 2019 $4,000 in cash and additional prizes for winning anglers! The tournament starts at 5:00 pm Friday, June 7, and catch records can be submitted for eligibility from then until 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. Wrap-up and awards banquet to be held at Roht Marine at 1:00 pm on Sunday, where food will be provided to participants with a cash bar. This is a catch and release tournament. Winners will be chosen from photos submitted within time limits of the tournament only. Submit catch pictures by texting or e-mailing fishing@nsrwa.org. Catch records will not be considered eligible before 5:00 pm Friday, or after 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. Online registration closes on Friday, June 7 at 12:00 noon. Adult entries are $70 pre-registration, $75 day of. Children 12 and under will be $35 pre-registration $40 day of. The six categories include: Motorized Boat Angler, Adult – $1,000 Cash Prize Motorized Boat Angler, 12 and under – Fishing Gear Prize Package Shore Angler, Adult – $1,000 Cash Prize Shore Angler, 12 and under – Fishing Gear Prize Package Kayak/Paddle Powered Angler, All ages – $1,000 Cash Prize Fly Fishing, Shore only, All Ages – $1,000 Cash Prize To Submit a Fish Photo: Winning fish will be judged by the length of the fish, and not the weight. The total length of the fish is defined from the lower jaw to the end of the tail pushed together. The fish should be placed on the provided measuring board, with the lower jaw touching the 90-degree lip at the beginning of the board, and the tail towards the end of the board pinched together to measure fish total length. For a picture to be eligible it must have the entire fish in the frame, including the 4-digit registration code on the end of the board; this code will identify the submitted catch to each individual registered angler and their category. For the Fly Fishing division, the fly reel must be in the photo. There will be six (6) categories to register under and receive winnings. No angler can win multiple categories without paying for more than one, and those who register for multiple categories cannot win more than one with the same length fish. Anglers fishing in Kayak/Paddle Powered Angler division, are required to launch from shore, and land on shore under their own power, and are prohibited from launching from a power vessel, or be transported to fishing grounds with the aid of a power vessel. Winning catch will be judged on overall length, and no fish will be manipulated to extend length that would result in damage to the fish. For submitted pictures to be eligible, fish must be landed in waters within the following geographic boundaries: Massachusetts Bay, southwest of a line from Point Allerton, Hull to Race Point, Provincetown; with a western boundary of the South Shore land masses and eastern boundary of the outer Cape. No fish caught from shore east of the breakwater of the Sandwich end of the Cape Cod Canal will be eligible. In the event that the difference in length between two or more winning fish in one category cannot be discerned by tournament regulation committee, then prize money will be divided equally. Participants can pick up their tournament packet, or register day of at Belsan’s Bait and Tackle located at 4 Brook Street, Scituate, MA on Friday, June 7 after 3:00 pm. Catch records will not be considered eligible before 5:00 pm that evening, or after 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. You will receive more information by email closer to the tournament date.
  5. Reports will be monthly at best. I put all my nonfishing free time into keeping a very detailed fishing log book. If I manage to hit my goal of one 40 inch fish per month starting in May I will try to get at least a quick picture up with fly pattern and presentation technique. I am heading into this season with two patterns windows per month that have produced 40-inch bass May through October in 2017 and 2018. With population continuing to get hammered my expectations are tempered substantially as less big fish will be available than last year. For me, I have to have goals driving my fishing efforts or I am not as productive. If I don't hit this one I will not be surprised, but if somehow I do I will be ecstatic. I need at least three or four crab flies prior to the third week of June so will have to tie them up or end up in a situation where I don't have what I need for fishing. Need the lobster fly in time for July and August.
  6. I am specifically talking about fishing crabs blind not sight fishing. Agree any sight bite is exciting.
  7. Hey no argument from me. I always preferred to eat my blue crabs instead of using them for bait. Chuck, you took both Ted and my picture. Both great nights. Two of the bass on separate trips I caught coughed up green crabs that is what turned me on to the fact they were keyed in on the crabs. Bass don't spit up their food often so when they do you have to take note.
  8. The Fly Rod category is approved. Here are details 2019 South Shore Striper Tournament Join NSRWA for a fun weekend of fishing! Friday, June 7–Sunday, June 9, 2019 $4,000 in cash and additional prizes for winning anglers! The tournament starts at 5:00 pm Friday, June 7, and catch records can be submitted for eligibility from then until 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. Wrap-up and awards banquet to be held at Roht Marine at 1:00 pm on Sunday, where food will be provided to participants with a cash bar. This is a catch and release tournament. Winners will be chosen from photos submitted within time limits of the tournament only. Submit catch pictures by texting or e-mailing fishing@nsrwa.org. Catch records will not be considered eligible before 5:00 pm Friday, or after 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. Online registration closes on Friday, June 7 at 12:00 noon. Adult entries are $70 pre-registration, $75 day of. Children 12 and under will be $35 pre-registration $40 day of. The six categories include: Motorized Boat Angler, Adult – $1,000 Cash Prize Motorized Boat Angler, 12 and under – Fishing Gear Prize Package Shore Angler, Adult – $1,000 Cash Prize Shore Angler, 12 and under – Fishing Gear Prize Package Kayak/Paddle Powered Angler, All ages – $1,000 Cash Prize Fly Fishing, Shore only, All Ages – $1,000 Cash Prize To Submit a Fish Photo: Winning fish will be judged by the length of the fish, and not the weight. The total length of the fish is defined from the lower jaw to the end of the tail pushed together. The fish should be placed on the provided measuring board, with the lower jaw touching the 90-degree lip at the beginning of the board, and the tail towards the end of the board pinched together to measure fish total length. For a picture to be eligible it must have the entire fish in the frame, including the 4-digit registration code on the end of the board; this code will identify the submitted catch to each individual registered angler and their category. For the Fly Fishing division, the fly reel must be in the photo. There will be six (6) categories to register under and receive winnings. No angler can win multiple categories without paying for more than one, and those who register for multiple categories cannot win more than one with the same length fish. Anglers fishing in Kayak/Paddle Powered Angler division, are required to launch from shore, and land on shore under their own power, and are prohibited from launching from a power vessel, or be transported to fishing grounds with the aid of a power vessel. Winning catch will be judged on overall length, and no fish will be manipulated to extend length that would result in damage to the fish. For submitted pictures to be eligible, fish must be landed in waters within the following geographic boundaries: Massachusetts Bay, southwest of a line from Point Allerton, Hull to Race Point, Provincetown; with a western boundary of the South Shore land masses and eastern boundary of the outer Cape. No fish caught west of the breakwater of the Sandwich end of the Cape Cod Canal will be eligible. In the event that the difference in length between two or more winning fish in one category cannot be discerned by tournament regulation committee, then prize money will be divided equally. Participants can pick up their tournament packet, or register day of at Belsan’s Bait and Tackle located at 4 Brook Street, Scituate, MA on Friday, June 7 after 3:00 pm. Catch records will not be considered eligible before 5:00 pm that evening, or after 12:00 noon on Sunday, June 9. You will receive more information by email closer to the tournament date.
  9. Well, the first day of spring is when I curtail a lot of my indoor fly fishing related activities (except fly tying which will continue through April) because its time to get on the water. My local small streams are iced out and have enough water its time to chase wild trout in tiny streams or get out and practice casting (aka chase holdover stripers which I have yet to catch one hence casting practice). I fish for my holdovers the same time I fish for my regular season stripers on the graveyard shift 2-6am. I won't be on SOL much because my limited time will be spent fishing. Only posts forthcoming is I owe @RedGreen a picture of my lobster fly I still need to tie up and @bonefishdick a picture of my large green crab fly. Tight lines to everyone this season and if you need to get in touch use the DM feature I will respond there. Dan
  10. Blue crabs are staple of stripers diet in Chesapeake where I grew up. Big stripers will eat full sized blue crabs. Using peeler crabs was a tactic similar to chunking menhaden. Smaller stripers will eat the juvenile blue crabs. Blue crabs are good swimmers very different from green crabs. On green crabs last year we were finding larger crabs came out at night and followed upper end of tide. The medium sized green crabs were about 2.5" wide and large ones 4" wide. Crabs were molting and mating bass were eating them and so were big eels. Made for some big bass conditions. @beerdoh nailed the big girl on an eel imitation.
  11. Its pretty normal for fly guys to use crab flies. Its boring but effective. Savage makes a green crab soft platsic that looks promising. Add pro-cure shedder crab super gel and I bet it catches well for you. near shellfish beds moved extremely slow on bottom or dead drift in a current outflow are my two main fly presentations. Where I fish bass are targeting european green crabs. But other areas they could be on different species
  12. I sold a large portion of my older rod collection to raise funds for the two new additions which are the Thomas and Thomas Exocett Surf Two Hand Rods. Tenkara USA 12' Iwana St. Croix Avid 7' 4WT for small stream trout Sage Mod 9' 5WT which is main trout rod Orvis PowerMatrix TLS 9' 6WT which is an older rod bought for throwing streamers for bigger trout and smallmouth Orvis PowerMatrix TLS 10' 7WT has an extended butt so can serve as a good switch rod or for high stick nymphing. Was original great lakes steelhead rod. G. Loomis GLX Switch 11' 7WT is main steelhead and salmon rod (not Kings but other four species) G. Loomis Crosscurrent 9' 9WT is main bonefish/permit/striper flats rod G. Loomis Stinger Alta 12'6" 9/10WT is main king salmon spey rod and does skagit in saltwater for me as well Thomas and Thomas Exocett Surf 11'2" 10WT is main striper TH OH rod Thomas and Thomas Exocett Surf 11'2" 12WT is Cape Cod Canal TH OH rod. Want to take this to South Florida and try tarpon from beach sometime.
  13. I would love to be able to target gator blues they must fight like the devil. The 3-4 pound ones I caught in Chesapeake growing up fought like bass double their size
  14. Never caught one from shore in six season. The South Side of Cape Cod and Islands have tons of big blues. I am usually in Boston area and I have seen some small snapper blues less than 12" chasing bait, but never hooked any blues fishing.
  15. Salt Ponds: A Beginners Best Friend Salt Ponds are one of best places day or night for beginners to start their fly fishing endeavors for striped bass. They have diverse bait options and are an easily understood area for a beginner. Many fly fishermen reading this probably have a small to medium sized salt pond that they fish the outlet on a dropping tide during the day for schoolies. The problem is in your head this is a schoolie spot, but what if I told you that you’re just approaching it the wrong way for targeting big fish. My favorite salt pond near my house has fly fishermen and light tackle spin guys there frequently. Sometimes if the sunrise looks like it might be epic and I am fishing on a weekend instead of before work I will stay well past my normal stop fishing time of 5:30am and will hang out until 6-6:30am. Will put on a small gurgler and see if I can raise a few schoolies on topwater because topwater is always exciting while I wait for some awesome picture shots to reveal themselves. During that 5:30-6:30am window new guys will show up and politely ask if they can fish. I will say “go right ahead I am pretty much-done fishing anyways”. Often they will remark it’s a great spot for schoolies and my response is “Well you are showing up 3 hours later than you need to if you want a keeper”. To this day I yet to see one of them show up when I am fishing 2-5am. I am not saying they would have caught tons of big fish and in fact, they probably caught way more striped bass than I did that same day. A good night in a salt pond throwing large flies will yield 2-3 fish in the 30 inches or larger bracket and another 3-5 fish in the mid to upper twenty-inch range. A more normal success rate at night with big flies is 1-3 fish in the 28-34 inch range. A good daytime falling tide using standard striper flies might yield 15-35 school stripers with a few 23-27 inch fish mixed in, but most fish will be 16-20 inches long with a fish over 30 inches being very rare. So a daylight trip is probably going to yield 3-6 times more fish caught than a dedicated night trip hunting big fish, but out of my all my daylight trips to fish salt ponds I have personally never caught a bass over 27 inches except one time. That one exception I stumbled onto a silverside spawning event and bait density was insane creating blitz conditions in the pond’s outflow as disoriented bait fish were getting sucked out of the pond by the falling tide. In general, I have found in salt ponds night incoming tide is usually the best tide window for catching larger bass. Depending on the pond the window varies because the tide may need to reach a certain level to start moving water into the pond. Outgoing at night tends to produce higher numbers of fish, but smaller average size than the incoming tide bite. However, at night the size of stripers is usually 50% better than what I catch in the same place on the drop in daylight, example day time average fish size is 18 inches and at night the average fish size is 24-25 inches. One way to set yourself up to have the best outing is to find a salt pond that only starts to fill up in the last hour or two hours of the incoming tide. Look for a night where high tide is half an hour before listed sunrise time. Show up 2 hours before high tide and fish the night incoming tide for bigger fish, but if you strike out in the dark you will get a shot to target smaller fish on the first two hours of the outgoing tide as the sun is coming up. I will often do this myself as many big fish hunting parties end in a skunk so its nice to bend the rod before heading to work. Months like June where first light starts before 5am allow me to fish both night and first light bite window before heading to work. The other mistake I tend to see is anglers get overly focused on the inlet/outlet area of the salt pond. I have found that bigger fish tend to actively search the pond for larger baits in the dark such as American eels. So my strategy is always fish the inlet as the tide starts breaching slope and creating that peak current window, but after 2-3 fish or 30-45 minutes, I will start fishing my way progressively deeper into the salt pond. I will then fish my way back to the inlet and fish the very end of the incoming tide at the inlet. As mentioned in the previous Night Striper Fishing #3 using your hearing frequently is a good way to help identify areas where stripers are actively feeding in a Salt Pond. These areas are usually quiet and have a calm surface so stalking to fish by sound and spotting the surface activity by moonlight or afterglow reflection on waters surface will help you target feeding fish in a large area. I don’t use poppers at night very often, but one way I like to use them is at slack tide in salt ponds. I fish them with one loud or two back to back hard pops then wait 60-90 seconds before popping them again. My poppers have very long black saddles or dragon tails off the back that have a lot of movement when relatively still. I believe bass think it’s an eel that was attached by another striper that is now stunned/injured near the surface. One other observation is on the drop usually large schoolies or a few keepers will take up feeding stations out the outflow for the higher stages of the drop where there are better current and more holding water. However, my biggest fish caught on the drop are usually solo fish in the 30-34 inch class have all come at a minimum holding water point during the drop. In the dark they seem comfortable coming into the very skinny water and at this point most of the bay and mudflats are exposed, but the salt pond outflow will have a very small falls like effect and the channel snaking out to the main channel will have enough water for a big fish to still come in to pond entrance from the main channel. The bait gets disoriented by the falls and a solo large bass can be right at the base of turbulent water. Also, the small bait gets packed into a very small area and I find this super density of bait brings in the bigger fish hunting solo. In general, I don’t catch truly huge fish over 40 inches in salt ponds, but there are two exceptions to this rule. First, if the salt pond has a freshwater source it may also get a small run of herring. Any salt pond with a herring run can produce a 40-inch striper during the adult herring spawning runs. The second exception to this rule is any isolated salt pond that has direct access to the main ocean. In these scenarios really big fish will move into the salt ponds to feed only on very extreme high tides at night. For example, say the normal high tide range is 8-9 feet, but on a new moon cycle, you see three nights where high tide is going to approach the 11-12 feet height. That is a potential for a big fish to come in and feed on the food density that is usually inaccessible or too skinny for them to feel comfortable feeding there. Lastly, here is what you need to do to scout out your favorite salt pond for night time fishing: Recon of the area leading up to the salt pond for channel structure. It is important to figure out what levels of water on incoming allow striped bass to move up to the entrance to the salt pond, breach the entrance of salt pond so the bass can access it, and when peak current occurs at the entrance to salt pond. Look for key pieces of structure at the inlet that would provide an ideal ambush location for a solo large fish. Examples are a piece of sod bank that fell off and makes a current break at the base of undercut sod bank, one large rock in the middle of the current flow, a small row of old dock pilings, or a scour hole behind a mussel bed just inside pond inlet. Identify any shellfish bed areas inside the main pond. These areas attract marine worms and green crabs which attract stripers feeding on them. If you see any make sure they are part of your fishing rotation through the pond during the incoming tide. Large crab flies can be the ticket to higher quality stripers near these beds at night, but you need ponds with good water quality and not a lot of mung or weeds to fish crabs along bottom effectively. Finally, let’s talk about fly selection and presentation tactics. So the bottom line is you came out in the dark to catch big fish, which means you need to throw larger flies. I recommend a 9-12 inch herring fly patterns like a hollow fleye or beast fleye or a conomo special. There are three approaches that work well. At the inlet, you can fish these on a swing in the current. My preference is after swinging them across the inlet current I like to retrieve them as tight to the sod bank as possible pushing a wake on the surface like a spooked herring. Inside the pond try a variety of retrieves from a surface waking bulge, an erratic below surface retrieve, and a slow continuous near bottom retrieve. The other fly you should have is an eel fly in the 11-12 inch range. Rich Murphy’s RM Rattlesnake and RM Quarter Moon Special are good fly pattern options. The Quarter Moon Special is a surface fly that is waked/skated across current on the swing or retrieved as slowly as possible across the main pond surface, but fast enough to create a surface wake. The RM Rattlesnake I like to fish near the bottom on a short fast strip retrieve to activate rattles or on a swing where I hold the fly line during the swing and induce 6 inch pulls and releases to activate rattles during the swing. Rich mentions in his book he likes to fish the rattlesnake along sod banks animating the fly with five strips followed by a long pause and says most hits occur on the initiation of the strip immediately after the long pause. I somehow missed this and caught it reading the book again over the winter so will test this retrieve out as well. You also need green crab flies preferably with one or two small rattles in them. Move the fly with two short fast strips to activate rattle then let sit 10-30 seconds before doing two more strips. This painfully slow retrieve works best. Depending on the depth of the pond I may switch to a full sinking line to fish this approach or you will need a much longer leader if using a floating line with a very heavily weighted crab fly. An intermediate will really waste your time as it will take too long to get to the bottom I don’t recommend it for crabs. Lastly, you should have silverside imitations for daylight schoolie fishing and a worm fly in case you happen on a worm spawning event. In the event of a silverside or worm spawn, I recommend you use a two-fly rig with the worm or silver side as the lead dropper fly and the big herring fly as the trail fly. Fish this fly with same retrieves as the herring fly. For fishing for schoolies at first light, I like to swing the fly or dead drift it under an indicator on the current outflow. Also casting into edges of current flow and retrieving fly back through slack water eddies can produce well. I prefer a floating line with a longer leader that way I can fish a deciever high in the water column and if fish feedback is poor switch to a clouser to get closer to bottom. As mentioned earlier I like a big popper for fishing any high slack windows in the dark. I fish them with one loud or two back to back hard pops then wait 60-90 seconds before popping them again. This retrieve is even slower than the crab retrieves and takes a lot of discipline.