beerdoh

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About beerdoh

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    Elite Member

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  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Fishing (duh), cycling, skiing.
  • What I do for a living:
    Working for the man.

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    MA

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  1. I’ve fished Nauset in October with seals popping up 10 feet in front of me. Caught plenty of fish but only in the dark. The bite dies as soon as the sun comes up.
  2. These fools always wear shorts and flip flops and have pets walking around nearby. It does work though he may have used too much fuel...
  3. x2 for Search Tempest...
  4. Maxxis makes great tires so the Mammoths will be an improvement no matter what. Those resistance tests are one dimensional so your experience may vary based on where you ride.
  5. Hey Tomkaz, Glad you finally took it for a spin. Rolling resistance is always going to be higher but some tires are much better than others. Based on findings from https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/fat-bike-reviews the rolling resistance on the Mammoths is pretty high. I've tried lots of fat bike tires and am currently using the Jumbo Jim's and there is a noticeable reduction from my previous tires (Husker Du). It all depends on the surface you are riding on. I notice resistance more on the road that I do in the dirt. Then there is grass. Riding on grass is the worst. I hate riding on grass as it creates a ton of resistance. On sand you probably won't notice much difference between tires unless you start picking up mud which adds weight. Regarding width. Every tire I've owned measures smaller than the advertised width printed on the sidewall. The bicyclerollingresistance site has the Mammoth at 3.8 inches so you should be fine. Seating the tires without a high-capacity compressor can be a challenge. I have a 45 gallon compressor in my garage and to be honest I have not tried seating tubeless fat tires without it. There are a couple of ways to get around not having a compressor. Always remove the valve core so you have the highest available air flow Always try to pull the sidewalls out towards the rim lip as far as you can to create a better seal Get the tire seated by installing a tube and inflating so the tire is fully seated. Open up one side and remove the tube. Then you have only one side to worry about seating without the tube instead of 2 Get everything installed and bring it to your LBS and have them seat it Spray something flammable like engine starter inside the tire and ignite it. The small explosion will seat the tires. Honestly I wouldn't try this but there are lots of youtube videos of people doing this with tractor tires. Good luck!
  6. Had this been an adult Cougar the outcome would likely have been different. I don’t care how tough you think you are, an adult Cougar is stronger, faster, has more weapons and zero inhibitions. I mean just look at the claws on that thing.
  7. Some guy in CO choked a mountain lion to death after it attacked him. Talk about man vs beast. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/mountain-lion-choked-death-runner-jogger-colorado-park-a8764821.html%3famp
  8. I hear you. I go through a lot of tires and it took me a few tire changes and bouts with various rim tapes to finally justify using the Cafelatex ones. They make it look easy to put on but man that stuff is hard to stretch onto the rim. No idea what it’s made of but seriously strong. Regarding the Schrader valve hole. There are adaptors or you can drill a smaller hole opposite the Schrader one. If you go with tape and a vinyl rim strip, I found that Zip System flashing tape works really well. It’s lighter than gorilla tape and has some stretch. It doesn’t absorb sealant either. Your lighter tubes with sealant in them should do the trick though. That’s how I setup my sons bike when he used to ride one...before he got his license. I’ve since graduated to plugging his car tires when he runs over nails and screws.
  9. All you need is Effetto Mariposa Caffelatex Tubeless Rim Strips. It’s not tape so no glue. You don’t even need the vinyl rim strip. It’s not cheap but I won’t use anything else. I can swap tires without cleaning the rims or changing tape that isn’t sticking any longer. It doesn’t absorb sealant like gorilla tape either. Comes with everything you need except sealant.
  10. What I said was, “It’s ridiculous to have to pay $600 for a cutting edge fishing rod with a 1 year warranty.” I have no issue paying for high end stuff if I feel I’m getting value for my money. I buy reels that are easy to repair with readily available parts e.g. Penn & VS. I can fix my own reels. When they go out of warranty I can buy parts when they wear out. Rods break. I can’t repair a broken rod so would pay more for a rod with a longer warranty.
  11. Looks great...and heavy! If you fill that crate you’ll be wheelying down the beach! The wing nuts are a good idea in case you need to jettison the load. If you are going to swap the tires you should consider going tubeless before you put the new tires on. Most rims can be converted for a few bucks. You can run lower pressures without the risk of pinch flats and it’s lighter. Getting the old tires off can be difficult. If you can’t easily get them unseated, lay the wheel on the floor on a piece of cardboard and walk on the sidewalls with some stiff soled shoes or boots. You’ll also need some plastic coated metal tire levers that you can hook to the spokes to get the tires off all the way. If you go with tubes with the new tires, be careful about pinching them if you try to pry the tires on with tire levers. Putting a small amount of air in the tubes (enough so they take shape) helps keep them out of the way and makes it easier to put the tube on. Put one side of the tire on, then fit the partially inflated tube inside and on the rim before closing it up. Good luck!
  12. Why can’t you believe I spent 3 grand on a bike? Point is I spent 3 grand once and it’s been replaced twice under warranty at no cost to me.
  13. They’ve been using carbon and more recently, carbon nano-tubes in bike frames for years. Many bike manufacturers offer lifetime warranties on their composite frames. I’ve personally warrantied 2 Specialized carbon frames that failed due to a design flaw. These retailed for $3000 a piece just for the frame. Not only did they replace the frame at no cost to me but the second time they gave me the updated version which resolved the defect. I still have that frame after 10 years and thousands of miles. If it breaks again, they will give me a new one. Margins in the bike industry are pretty low but if you build the correct business model, you can factor in the cost of warranty replacements. A bike frame is ALOT more complicated to design and build than a fishing rod and requires a lot more of the expensive raw materials along with the cost of molds and large curing ovens. Some of the US based companies are even making their high-end frames in the US. These new graphene rods are all made overseas and are way over priced. I bought a high quality carbon bike frame directly from China for $500. It has a 1 year warranty. I’ve beat the crap out of it for 3 years and no issues. If it breaks I got my money’s worth. The same frame can be had rebranded in the US for $1200 with maybe a 5 year warranty. So why can’t these fishing rod companies offer the same type of service? Either factor it into the cost or offer the warranty at purchase for those who want it and lower your prices for those that don’t. It’s ridiculous to have to pay $600 for a cutting edge fishing rod with a 1 year warranty.
  14. And when fishing from the rocks in big surf. Helps strengthen the gene pool...
  15. Thanks for the reply. I ask because I’ve been using my Tsunami in a high current inlet pulling out fish up to 44”. Throwing plugs and jigs up to 2.5 oz. Was thinking I could use a bit more power but not a lot.