tomkaz

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About tomkaz

  • Rank
    ^^^ It was classified as a COVID death
  • Birthday April 21

Converted

  • About Me:
    Mid-50s. Escaped the People's Republic of Connecticut July 2015.
  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Chasing anything with fins but in FL, no longer LI Sound.
  • What I do for a living:
    Pushing money around (my kids' view)

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Southeast Florida

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  1. I laugh at the narrative torpedos the Left and Dems are constantly unleashing, only to find them coming about and homing in on them, the Left and Dems. They never learn any restraint and it is always pushed to the point past diminishing returns and too actual counterproductive results for their narrative and plans. That chit is always funny and never gets old...
  2. This is CNN, and General Honre May be last his best-by-date. And this is Florida Harsh, but true.
  3. The legal basis per CNBC Trump considering a move to invoke Insurrection Act Monday, June 1, 2020 President Donald Trump is considering invoking a 213-year-old federal law that would allow him to deploy active-duty U.S. troops to respond to protests in cities across the country, according to four people familiar with the internal White House discussions. Trump has warmed to the idea of using the Insurrection Act, adopted in 1807, to deploy troops as his frustrations mount over the protests that have followed the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed in police custody last week in Minneapolis. Some of the president’s aides have been encouraging him for days to invoke the act, as he weighs options for exercising executive powers to address the crisis. The act was last invoked during the 1992 Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. The White House did not respond to a request for comment for this article but at a briefing with reporters Monday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany left open the possibility that the president could invoke the act. “The Insurrection Act, it’s one of the tools available, whether the president decides to pursue that, that’s his prerogative,” McEnany said. Governors can ask that the federal government send active duty troops to help in cases of civil unrest like the widespread protests plaguing U.S. cities over the last several days. But, so far, no governor has requested active duty troops to assist and instead have relied on local law enforcement and National Guard soldiers and airmen on state active duty. Governors often prefer the National Guard forces in these cases because they can legally perform law enforcement duties in the U.S., whereas troops on active duty cannot or they violate the Posse Comitatus Act, a 1878 law that prohibits the government from using military forces to act as a police force within U.S. borders. But the president could invoke the Insurrection Act to deploy active-duty troops without a request from a governor. Those troops would be allowed to conduct law enforcement missions. To invoke the act, Trump would first have to issue a proclamation to “immediately order the insurgents to disperse and retire peaceably to their abodes within a limited time,” according to the law. In the past the Justice Department has drafted such proclamations. And according to the Congressional Research Service, the act has been invoked many times throughout U.S. history although rarely since the 1960s civil rights era. When it was invoked in 1992 during the Los Angeles riots, the move was requested by then-California Gov. Pete Wilson, not invoked solely by the president. The Defense Department declined to comment on the possibility that the president could invoke the act. One of Trump’s allies outside the White House, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., urged Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act “if necessary” so U.S. troops can “support our local law enforcement and ensure that this violence ends tonight.”
  4. The Gunshine State
  5. Independent autopsy and Minnesota officials say George Floyd's death was homicide (CNN)Experts hired by George Floyd's family and the Hennepin County Medical Examiner have concluded his death was a homicide, but they differ on what caused it. The independent autopsy says Floyd died of "asphyxiation from sustained pressure" when his neck and back were compressed by Minneapolis police officers during his arrest last week. The pressure cut off blood flow to his brain, that autopsy determined. But the medical examiner's office, in its report also released Monday, said that the cause of death is "cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint, and neck compression." Cardiopulmonary arrest means Floyd's heart failed. The medical examiner made no mention of asphyxiation. The Hennepin County release says heart disease was an issue; the independent examiner didn't find that.
  6. Who needs the Feds when you are a Cleveland Eyetalian?
  7. This is how conservatives deal with it. Cleveland Eyetalians
  8. But it was a conclusion that was forgone, homicide. Unless they were going to suggest the virus killed him, whether it was asphyxiation due to pressure on his neck and back or a heart attack due to the circumstances, it was going to be a homicide. That was nearly inarguable. So why even start this thread? You neither raised nor posed a question, sort of a requirement for PG threads. Just looks like you were fishing for commentary, over nothing surprising. There's a name for such a thing, but it escapes me right now.
  9. Sent to me by my sister in Carmel, whose daughter, my niece, lives about a block from the mentioned location. I am hoping it is bullchit because city folk don't like going up into the country at night, to the places where folks own guns and ammo.
  10. RIOTS IN THE AGE OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND SELFIES: ‘We came to riot:’ Illinois man is facing charges after he livestreamed himself lighting fires and throwing bombs at Minneapolis cops, authorities say. FLOYD’S BROTHER DEMANDS END TO VIOLENCE: “If his own family and blood is not doing it, then why are you?” THIS IS CNN: CNN Journo Morphs Into Riot Apologist/Activist on Live TV, Excuses Fires and Destruction as Justifiable (Video).
  11. Remind me, when the governors were threatening to enforce lockdowns by force, how many buildings burned, stores looted, small business people's lives destroyed, innocent people assaulted or killed. Wake me when national martial law is instituted Or when the US military takes an active role, as opposed to standing on the periphery as a rapid action backup to the local LEA and state NG Or when the presence of the extends beyond a couple of days after the riots dies down. Until then, place me among those who believe that when cities are burning and the local government wont defend their cities or their people, our common citizenship requires the federal government to back and protect the people.
  12. Yeah, about Sweden as a role model: Sweden’s coronavirus experiment has well and truly failed The country gained early praise from some for shunning lockdown, but it now has one of the highest per-capita rates of coronavirus death in the world Swedes are generally more trusting of authority and science than those in other countries, he adds. Despite recent murmurings of disquiet, the agency remains broadly popular among the public – and Tegnell has become something of a cult figure in Sweden, with toasts on his birthday and people getting tattoos of his face. But that’s been part of the problem. “The biggest problem in Sweden is there is really only one voice – that voice is the public health agency, and in particular Anders Tegnell,” Einhorn says. So, while the UK and other countries which had initially embarked on a similar path changed tack and instituted national lockdowns, Sweden stuck to its guns. Now, it’s had nine times as many deaths per capita as neighbouring Norway, and it’s facing potential exclusion from a regional travel bubble because of fears Swedes will spread the virus. Tegnell has been criticised by his predecessor for not instituting a lockdown. More than 4,000 people have died in a country of ten million. For seven of the last 14 days, Sweden has had the highest number of deaths per capita in the world. “Sweden hasn’t changed very much at all,” says Paul Franks, an epidemiologist at Lund University. “But because things have changed in other countries, you’ve noticed the change in the relative death rates.” The comparison is particularly stark when compared to Sweden’s neighbours, which have similar cultural practices and healthcare systems – it has almost four times as many deaths as Norway, Finland and Denmark combined.
  13. Sweden’s coronavirus experiment has well and truly failed The country gained early praise from some for shunning lockdown, but it now has one of the highest per-capita rates of coronavirus death in the world Swedes are generally more trusting of authority and science than those in other countries, he adds. Despite recent murmurings of disquiet, the agency remains broadly popular among the public – and Tegnell has become something of a cult figure in Sweden, with toasts on his birthday and people getting tattoos of his face. But that’s been part of the problem. “The biggest problem in Sweden is there is really only one voice – that voice is the public health agency, and in particular Anders Tegnell,” Einhorn says. So, while the UK and other countries which had initially embarked on a similar path changed tack and instituted national lockdowns, Sweden stuck to its guns. Now, it’s had nine times as many deaths per capita as neighbouring Norway, and it’s facing potential exclusion from a regional travel bubble because of fears Swedes will spread the virus. Tegnell has been criticised by his predecessor for not instituting a lockdown. More than 4,000 people have died in a country of ten million. For seven of the last 14 days, Sweden has had the highest number of deaths per capita in the world. “Sweden hasn’t changed very much at all,” says Paul Franks, an epidemiologist at Lund University. “But because things have changed in other countries, you’ve noticed the change in the relative death rates.” The comparison is particularly stark when compared to Sweden’s neighbours, which have similar cultural practices and healthcare systems – it has almost four times as many deaths as Norway, Finland and Denmark combined.
  14. Santa Monica Looter Admits He's Doing It 'for the Money,' Not George Floyd Bill Melugin on Fox 11 Los Angeles was in the middle of the riots in Santa Monica, Calif., on Sunday, and got the opportunity to interview a looter who was arrested. “Alright man, we saw you at the New Balance store, why are you out here?” Melugin asked. “Man, very point-blank … just trying to get some money … simple explanation, that’s it, just trying to get some dough, that’s it,” the looter replied. “Just out here for the money?” “Yeah, pretty much,” the looter admitted. “Anything to do with the protests, what happened in Minnesota?” “I mean, a little bit to do with that, too … But not really, I’m out here for the dough.” “Was it worth it?” “Obviously not,” he said, before offering some really simple advice to others: “If you all going to get some money, do it right. Don’t do it the dumb way. Do it the smart way.”
  15. Rioters So Angry About George Floyd ... They Wrote 'Free Palestine' on a Synagogue