NaturalScience

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About NaturalScience

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    Senior Member

Converted

  • About Me:
    A decent fisherman who hopes to get better.
  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Dreaming about boats I'll never own. Lol.
  • What I do for a living:
    Work too hard for too little
  1. I'm thinking about the spinosad but if I remember correctly it's harmful to bees until it dries. At this point I've been hand picking best I can. There haven't been too many but obviously some get by. They might be the hardest shell beetles I've come across. Have to use actual muscle to squish. Lol.
  2. So I came across these nasties while I was applying yet another dose of neem oil to the garden (I swear I rains every time I apply). They were on the tomatillo along with mommy or daddy, a three striped potato beetle. I've been pretty regular about spraying but I'm considering using some beetle traps as well. I'm looking into a particular strain of BT that works on potato beetle, also. The slugs have shown up on the cabbage. I've sprayed them with neem, too, but it didn't seem to deter the slugs. Buried half a beer there to see if that will help.
  3. Yup Jim is on point.
  4. Thanks Mike, The method you describe does seem a bit easier plus having the benefit of seeing the roots. I shall give that a try next time. As to jamming cuttings directly in the ground, that is the first method I tried this year. After a bit of wilting the 3 cuttings are growing quite nicely. I do find tomatoes to be a pretty forgiving plant when it comes to abuses such as pruning and rooting.
  5. So I'm trying that suggestion someone mentioned about the cup of dirt prior to cutting.
  6. Dont know about tomatillo but I just did this with tomatoes. Worth a shot sticking it in some dirt and seeing if it takes. Rose, I can't help you with, I did away with decorative plants that require more than basic attention. Lol. I'm a lazy gardener.
  7. I hope you get some answers gell. The irrigation system will have to await until next year for me but I am very interested in this system you are using. It'll be nice to have something to reference.
  8. Just cooked up the scapes in a simple stir fry tonight. Very tasty.
  9. Basically was an experiment but since they have taken, my intention is to give them to friends. Pretty cool how easily they root and keep on going.
  10. In these past three years i have found tomatoes to be a pretty forgiving and resilient plant. Susceptible to a few things but overall a hardy and resilient plant. I trimmed a few big branches off some plants. These branches had the root nubs, no roots, but the nubs. For S and G, I stuck them in some dirt in pots. This was over a week ago and after an initial wilting period of a couple days they appear to be flourishing.
  11. Found a pretty informative video online and you guys are spot on about the garlic. They have about 10 leaves. The second leaf from the bottom is just starting to brown and die, so I think maybe a week or 2 until harvest. The suggestion being harvest when about 1/3 of the bottom leaves dying back.
  12. Might just be a San marzano thing. First year with them. I think I'll try the method you suggest about pruning with a plant or two and compare it with leaving a few extra branches.
  13. Thanks Jim, Between yours and Steve's advice I think I will give a call to the company (which escapes me at the moment) and see what they recommendation as well. As always there is more to it than I thought, lol.
  14. Thanks Steve. It was freaking me out, the tomatoes growing differently from the others. Lol. I dont think my brain was ready to think about harvesting garlic yet. This definitely goes in the journal.