Roccus7

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About Roccus7

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    Midcoast Maine
  1. A Truly Delightful Morning... Was able to sleep in a bit as the tide was dead low at 1st light and woke up to ZERO WIND!!! Shocking!!! Decided to hit the water to check out my incoming spots now that it seems the bass fishing has settled into the summer routine. I was excited in that I could use my normal drift patterns, not worrying about anchoring in a high wind and tide spot, not worrying about wind on tide making the popper jump from wave crest to wave crest, not worrying about "Hat Overboard" drills, had one yesterday, etc. Got a dozen from 17 - 24", but even before I caught the first one, I was enjoying the morning so much I said to myself, "This is a great day! I don't care if I get skunked!" The wildlife was abundant, eagles on either side of the river declaring that they had the biggest you know what, osprey flying with alewives in their talons, deer feeding along the river side (They eat rockweed, I guess for salt or iodine?}, seals swimming around and even a muskrat, that was a first!! Drifts were perfect, so perfect in that as I was thinking to myself, "I should have been hit by -- BAM!! -- now." Fish caught in all of the historically accumulated incoming spots targeted this AM, another gratifying part of the day. Bottom line, it was just a perfect morning!! Maine, the way retired life should be...
  2. One Rack pic, then a trio of Fore and Aft views...
  3. And to boot, you get to "enjoy" the highest COVID-19 infection incidence down there...
  4. The wind over the past few days has severely restricted my fishing. Tried last evening and gave up after a few casts because couldn't get an anchor to hold in the marsh mud in only 7' of water. When the sun popped out and the wind dropped at around 13:30 this afternoon, I decided to give it a try, planning to hit some of my more remote and stealthy spots. As I neared one I looked out to the center of the harbor and saw complete bedlam with terns, gulls and cormorants working Brits being chased by bass. Easily drifted into the midst of the melee and was actually watching fish swimming and feeding under the boat. As far as angling success, there was so much bait I was only able to snare 5 from 21-24". In regards to personal satisfaction, where in the world but Maine can you be the only boat fishing a full-blown bass blitz in the middle of a harbor during the afternoon on a sunny, early summer weekend day?
  5. Guess the crowds are a "Nothern MA" issue. Up here very few moorings have boats on them. Doesn't break my heart in the least...
  6. A fine collection ended, by popular demand, Seahorse Chick...
  7. Wind blowing too hard to fish, and an Idle Mind IS a Devil's Workshop...
  8. But WAIT!!! There's MORE!!!
  9. This AM's surfing was a bunch of Legs, Racks and Aces, but hey, they're all Brunettes...
  10. "Right" is relative. As you explore an area you begin to amass a compendium of "Right Tides" at different spots. Eventually you will have a library that will provide you with the ability to fish ANY tide with success. That's what "Local Knowledge" is all about...
  11. Pizza, Coke and ????
  12. As beaches reopen, a record number of piping plovers are nesting By Megan Gray Staff WriterMay 25, 2020 The jetty path to Wells Beach is closed because a piping plover nested in it. There are a record number of piping plovers nesting at Maine beaches this year. Wells Beach has nine nests, with seven of those active. Ben McCanna/Staff Photographer The piping plovers, at least, are having a good spring. Maine Audubon has spotted 100 pairs and 61 active nests so far this year, a positive sign for the spring nesting season. Last year, the group reported 89 nesting pairs and 175 fledged chicks, which was a record for Maine. The tiny beachcombers have been rebounding for years but remain endangered in Maine. A piping plover forages on Wells Beach on Saturday. There are a record number of the endangered shorebirds nesting in Maine this year. Ben McCanna/Staff Photographer “We’re getting a lot of nests,” said Maine Audubon’s Laura Minich Zitske, director of the Piping Plover and Least Tern Project. “More and more every single day.” The pandemic has changed beach traffic in southern Maine during a critical time for the plovers, but the effect has been different based on beach and town. Plovers start arriving in Maine in March and begin to nest in late April. The first chicks hatch in late May, and they continue in June and July. They usually spend a month on the ground before they can fly. Some beaches have been open and experiencing more visitors than usual. Brad Zitske, a wildlife biologist at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife who is married to Laura Minich Zitske, said he was worried when stir-crazy crowds flocked to the state’s coastal parks earlier than usual. “They seemed like a mid-June weekend in March,” he said. Other beaches have been closed for weeks, so the birds have been able to nest with little interference. But when people return to those beaches, they might find nests in irregular places. On Wells Beach, a nest has closed a popular path, so people will need to use other access points. Plovers start arriving in Maine in March and begin to nest in late April. The first chicks hatch in late May, and they continue in June and July. Ben McCanna/Staff Photographer “The birds really don’t know where the people are going to be,” Laura Minich Zitske said. “Normally, there would be some foot traffic in some areas, even on a crummy-weather day in the spring, that would tell the birds that this is not a good place to commit to.” She credits the growth in the plover population to partnerships between Maine Audubon and the state, as well as the efforts of volunteers and towns to protect the birds. More than two dozen beaches are monitored right now for plovers. As those areas reopen in the coming weeks, experts said visitors should be considerate of the birds. Many but not all nests are marked with signs and fencing. Experts said observers should give the birds and their babies space, wherever they are on the sand. Towns and beaches have varied requirements – for example, on whether dogs are allowed – so visitors should do their research ahead of time and pay attention to signs. “The chick stage is the most adorable and charming,” Laura Minich Zitske said. “They’re little fluffy cotton balls, and it’s fun when families sitting on the beach get to watch an endangered species grow before their eyes. But it’s also when they’re the most vulnerable because they move all over the beach.” So social distancing can help the plovers stay safe, too. “Definitely use caution,” Brad Zitske said. “We don’t want to take a step backwards, even though we are on this upward trajectory.”