Peter Patricelli

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About Peter Patricelli

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  1. You say you were using a shooting head setup. To me, that means you had some sort of detachable connection.....rather than a permanent connection (either by factory or by secondary attachment). A permanent attachment I would characterize as an integrated aggressive head system. When you are using a standard shooting head setup.....or the integrated equivalent in a full line like the Rio Outbound Short, that dramatic, black and white difference between a relatively short head and then running line encourages/forces you to have the the exact same overhang of head out past the tip top.....cast after cast. That first three feet of shooting line consequently takes the unvarying brunt of the worst, concentrated abrasion, cast after cast, as you make your last forward delivery.......initial high angle backward....acceleration forces....and then sawing the line across the tip tip during maximum acceleration during the double haul. I have a stable of separate running lines and heads from, initially, aggressive integrated full lines that wore out in that three feet. I cut off the head at the junction, cut off the worn area, turn the running line around, and use whatever connection I am favoring for the moment.....usually loop to loop. But my point is the tremendous abrasion concentrated in that small area by the design and specific casting dynamic of a true shooting head.....or aggressive integrated line designed to mimic a shooting head system. There have been a lot of detachable head system running lines that have come and gone over the years, from, initially, any-old-mono to fancy new dedicated stuff. One advantage of a detachable system is the ease with which one can cut back, re-loop, and reattach. I can't tell you what the best abrasion resistant braided running line is as these days I use my head systems very heavily but only in a specific fishery/situation and have found, in that time and place, that the Rio Slick-shooter....in 50#.....once stretched.....is near perfect (for me). And, by the way, is extremely "slick"......and very abrasion resistant. Some of the SS running line on my head system reels has been there for 10 years....or more.
  2. 2+ the above. When I first read the narrative, I was thinking Bluefin....until you said it ran into shallow water. Capt Gil Burke, now retired, said he had a false albacore taken out of his hands while he was unhooking it by a BFT....but that was in NC, Why not a bluefish off Block Isl.?
  3. Absolutely zero personal experience with great lakes steelhead, but 60 years experience with northwest ocean run fish......and I find certain details of this discussion interesting. First of all, fishing a nymph dead drift without an indicator used to be, back 40 years ago, the very epitome of PhD, top level skill trout fishing. It took years and years of experience with line behavior in currents to get it right and it was considered the most deadly technique of all. Beginner/intermediate techniques were a swinging/dragging presentation or dry fly upstream....where the fly and it's behavior were visible. But dead drift without indicator was way out of reach of 90% of fly fishermen. Then came indicator fishing and suddenly any beginner with a half hour casting lesson could dead drift a nymph and profit from the effectiveness of that presentation. I credit (or blame) indicator fishing partly for an explosion of interest.....and DE-mystification.....and even de-valuing and loss of respect of what it took to become a good fly fisherman. The difference between dead drifting a nymph without indicator (actually there IS an indicator......the leader....or the tip of the fly line) and a dedicated indicator is the difference between actually climbing a mountain versus getting a ride on something to the top. Thus my reaction of irony to the reversal of: "Chuck and duck I all I know… I always go as light as I can I’m not dredging bottom and I do really well that way but the indicator just feels more “pure” to me " "It’s the only way I know. When I’m not catching sometimes I get frustrated and try an indicator and I feel lost although I know how to manage line control etc." Puzzled by the problem. Compared to no indicator, indicator fishing is so straightforward. You fish the indicator as being your "dry fly" and mend to keep IT dead drifting. With an indicator one can do something nearly impossible otherwise, dead drift (no indicator) downstream for LONG distances. In my experience....and opinion.....the flossing question is mostly, for steelhead anyway (as opposed to salmon) specious. Yes, absolutely, no doubt about it whatsoever.....steelhead DO EAT during their spawning runs, although how much and how actively depends on the river size and the length of the fun. Here in the NW the fish come in well fed and stoked up fat. They are suddenly in a new (forgotten?) environment and removed from their accustomed food sources. They are curious, at first, but not especially ravenous. Winter-run fish that come into cold, short rivers, spawn almost immediately, and return to the ocean may not get that hungry or energy-stressed. But fish that come in between April-May....or Aug-Sept....have to run up 500 miles of river, over-winter, and then spawn in march-April.....have damn well GOT TO EAT. Their reactiveness to food sources...or possible food sources....changes dramatically during those months......to the benefit of the fishermen. How and what they react to may be geared to the food sources of the river they are in, but I have watched steelhead searching out and picking up nymphs off the bottom, actively feeding on duns during a hatch. Clearly, at times when a hatch starts and the local resident trout, rainbow, redband, or coastal cutthroat strt feeding the steelhead join in. And in this land of Pteronarcys (salmon flys) and Hexagenia, I have cashed in BIG TIME by matching the hatch with both nymphs AND DRYS during the proper times. Approaching a 10# or bigger fish smashing duns on the surface can get your knees shaking. I concentrate on a very specialized, unknown....and unpublicized...... for a reason......fishery that in a good year during two months will yield 500+ fish (if I am working it hard).....never fishing beyond lunchtime. 7-8 before noon is about average. My best morning was 53 hookups, 32 landed by 1:00 pm. Among the local fly fishermen that have heard the whispering and tried it......it has been long dismissed as "flossing". That could not be further from the truth......demonstrably.......but since it keeps the pressure down, those of us who know the fishery do not bother arguing against that notion. Instead we find it a quite quaint and useful misconception. Here, those believing in the "flossing" theory are just those who cannot figure out (or in some cases bend their brains to correct old beliefs) how to catch these fish.......using their old, rigid, less demanding techniques. Yes, steelhead eat....regularly....what the environment presents to them. They are also very curious and at times will chase down and eat almost ANYTHING that is strange, weird, MIGHT be edible.....like a large, pink, plastic worm hooked through the midsection. They are a very confounding fish. If you want to know what steelhead are thinking...i dunno....you might try hallucinogenics. Any technique works, sometime or another. Some more consistently than others. Some better in the hands of some fishermen than others. You are fly fishing because you like the challenge of fishing with one hand tied behind your back. Choose your technique and refine it. But keep your thinking open. Assemble this link: https:// flyfishingfotography.smugmug.com/ Family/Flyfishingfotography/i-mZm82Sz/A
  4. Interesting replies and reactions to my problems with braid, especially from Brian Horsely., who probably has more experience than any 5 of us. I wonder what general maintenance routine he uses.....if any. I use almost none.....and that may be the source of my problem, but then there is still a valid warning there for others like-minded. I also wonder, as I ponder the mechanics of the hangup when braid "buries". whether the older, small arbor reels are susceptible and large arbor reels are not. When it buries it goes down near to the arbor, where the radius is small and a hard pull is much less effective at pulling it out. With a large arbor reel the radius and therefore effectiveness at clearing itself with less tension at least theoretically would be greater. All the reels I have had the problem with are old classics......and small arbor. I do find it interesting that in conventional big game tackle I have seen virtually no evidence of braid use at all.....just huge reels filled with miles of mono. Is my perception there wrong? If braid were so benign then I would expect a massive shift to braid to get all that "baking" and long-run-insurance onto smaller, less expensive reels. Can anyone comment on that?
  5. I have used braid on a lot of reels, both level wind and for fly backing. Now, NONE of my fly reels has braid on it. The problem is.....the strength to diameter ratio....which is the primary selling point of braid, besides the lack of stretch......creates the problem of the very high tension you can put on it, through the drag OR your thumb, causes the very thin diameter stuff to dig in and bury itself in the bed of, relatively speaking, less tensely wound braid. Suddenly, when you try and stop a run, your line is jammed and you have less than a second (NO STRETCH) to fix it before breakoff. Bottom line, it takes an immense, obsessive effort to maintain the winding of the less used bed as tight and taut to resist the digging in. I have lost 5-6 big sturgeon......which I don't care about....to the problem, and I still use braid in that setting. But I have also lost a big tarpon, when after the 6th jump it took off on a blistering run......and since I have not landed a tarpon over 40#, I damn well DID care about that one. I replaced the braid on all my big-game fly reels. ALL backing is not immune from problems. And the biggest problem is that too often it is wound on for backing and then not touched for 20 years or so until that special moment when you have an exceptional fish, and that damn deep stuff not touched for years, is NOT PASSIVE and has expanded and contracted innumerable times with wetting/drying cycles and/or heat/cold changes, and it has creeped around all by itself under there....until your fish of a lifetime exposes it. Dacron is not perfect, but it is WAY less likely to cause problems than braid. I have also noticed that the bass/level-wind crowd has also acknowledged the problem......and recommends the higher strength braids (as opposed to the very light stuff) since they are larger diameter in relation to the potential stress. If you are going to care about losing the biggest fish that exposes backing not diligently maintained......don't use braid.
  6. I'm away from home and can't post a picture for more than a week. But they are easy to describe. In the four corners there are slightly deeper pockets, about 1/4", to collect sloshing water, and a single hole in each about 1/8" or slightly larger. My first thought was that the holes were too small and would drain too slowly....but I didn't touch them. In usage I found that was not an issue, but an advantage. With periodic waves, the filling is slow, as is the drainage, which does NOT move the line around promoting tangles. I never really got the basket flooded by a wave, but the low sides would limit the depth and make it easy to slosh much of the water back out. Serge's basket had no holes at all, but we drilled them. What I mostly remember about the week using it was that I DON"T remember the basket much at all. It was there and did its job and stayed out of my consciousness. I remember the fishing....which was smooth and I was not fighting tangles.
  7. I had 3-4 fiberglass rods, some from then well-known manufacturers come and go in those very first years I was learning to fly cast and fish, starting around 1957-8. Not one of them was worth a piece of s***,......until I got my first Fenwick. Anything with letter-coded line weight designation........run. The fiberglass era in rods began immediately upon the end of WWII. But, since all fly rods until that time had been bamboo.......and the mechanics of fly casting were not well understood and based upon bamboo rods and mostly small streams, the assumption was that the new fiberglass rods should emulate a bamboo action. Consequently they were/are heavy and S......L.....O......W....... I experienced puberty waiting for my backcast to unload and straighten. By applying too much acceleration force you could easily "shock" the rod and get a hellacious tailing loop as the rod tip rebounded upward. That "bamboo" based thinking kept the Orvis synthetics, fiberglass and early graphite, rods WAY behind, action-wise, for decades. The best thing that happened to me was when the wind pushed the car door closed as my very first rod (fiberglass) slipped over the door opening. I was freed of my forced captivity in tip heavy, loopey, slow-rod-hell. However, I will say that my early experience trying to learn on those rods did teach me a flexibility and adaptability to ANY rod action that has been useful for the rest of my fishing career. I wrote a long treatise touching upon these issues back a decade ago......how we got from "then" to "now". http://www.flyfishingfotography.com/fly_reel_metallurgy_001.htm
  8. There are two functions of a leader: 1) less visibility that tying the fly directly to the fly line, and 2) as a safety "fuse" that is weaker and will break before anything more valuable breaks......such as.....the fly line (depending on line.....core breaking strength may be 20# or 30#, and for specialty big game line, up to 50# or above. It is not recommended for the fly line to be the weakest link. One wrap around the reel handle on the first run and you'll find out why. I have learned that one the hard way.
  9. If you can't get nail clippers onboard, and you should be able to check allowability ahead of time......the obvious answer is.......................leave the rat tails in place and go onto the next knot/leader. No necessity that you trim them immediately. Often when tying a leader I will leave all the trimming until after the leader is done and do it all at once. You're welcome.
  10. Old thread, and I don't know what the original question, or point, was, But this caught my eye: "You do realize that if the waterway is already stocked with trout, the trout will be there if the water is viable? " That statement, if intended as a certainty, is absolutely false. Here in the NW we are surrounded by clean, oxygenated waters that have good populations of native trout. But.....because native trout can be hard to catch, and do not reproduce fast enough to fill the demand if the presssure is heavy enough and every caught fish is killed, the demand became that the waters be stocked with "hatchery raised" fish. This went on for decades....with very variable results.....until two facts became evident. 1) Even in the best "viable" water, if it is a typical medium gradient river, 95% of hatchery-raised stocked trout will be dead within 2 weeks. Raised in a protected concrete pool and hand-fed, they simply don't know what to eat, how to avoid predators, and how to manage the energy equation between fighting current and efficient feeding. Once this fact was appreciated the fish departments went with the flow and stocked "catchables", legal sized fish indended to be harvested and taken.....quickly, before they died.....by planting large numbers in the designated areas the "fishermen" could easily get to them....in large numbers. This, "put and take (quickly)" became the model. Again, it took awhile until it was realized that this model caused serious harm to the native fish population because the swarm of stocked (dumb) fish competed and displaced native fish from holding waters, competed with them for food (even if the stocked trout never got enough), and brought in large numbers of fishermen who were going to kill anything they caught....hatchery or wild.....and even the inefficient pressure on the wild fish, by a lot of people, killed a lot of wild fish. A study was done, in our local blue-ribbon rver, the McKenzie, and my home club, the McKenzie Flyfishers, were the major participants for the ODFW, keeping careful records of catch rates and fish populations in a designated stretch that had been stocked, frequently throughout the season, for years. The stocking was stopped and the wild fish population was tracked. Catch and release was practiced. Within 4-5 years the wild fish population increased from, roughly 500 wild fish.mile to over 2000 fish/mile. The fishing and catching was fabulous. The eating.....for those fishermen whose only concept of fishing was/is dunking a bait in a still pool while they sit in a chair.....not so much. The study is available online. Stocking of hatchery trout in rivers, in this state, for "put and take", has stopped completely. Hatchery fish stocked into lakes and ponds do reasonably well...., will survive and "hold-over", and satisfy that part of the public demand at reasonable cost. But.....the idea that....."if the waterway is already stocked with trout, the trout will be there if the water is viable"....is absolutely NOT a certainty.....and in fact devastates the native trout population.....even if those hatchery fish are NOT harvested. Water viability as the critical factor, has nothing to do with it And that is without even getting into the polluted genetics and weakening of the native trout strain in a river by the few hatchery trout that might/do survive to try and spawn,
  11. Earlier I wrote: "This thread made me think about what the ideal stripping basket, for me, would be. The problem I had when I used an enclosed basket was that it was too deep. It HAS to be deep if it is to keep water/waves out.....since it doesn't drain. But....then it starts floating up and the top is too high when wading at waist depth. For me and my fishing style.....didn't work. So, I concluded, I wanted a shallow basket that gives me deeper wading options. But then it swamps and has to drain! Then I thought about cones and other line-stabilizing devices, which I have never bothered to put on my dishpan. OK, I got it. The perfect, for me, basket. Shallow, cones, drains. I was in the local Cabelas yesterday buying a few last minute details.....and BINGO! There it was. The World Wide Sportsman stripping basket, $50. It is relatively small, the back and sides are low, while the front is higher.....which IS functional.........keeps out more waves, but doesn't interfere with hands during stripping, but low sides defend you against the serious weight of flooding. And, it has small drain holes in the four corners, which could be enlarged if I found that necessary, as well as small holes through the top of the cones....yes, cones. I'm going back to buy one and give it a roll." Here is my report: After 10 days shore fishing my report is.......this is the best stripping basket i have ever used. Period. For the most part I just forgot about it and it became a normal part of my anatomy/gear as I concentrated on the fishing......not the casting and line management. What is different about it is that it is shallow along the sides where your hands overhang. Deep-dry baskets float up as you wade deep and quickly become obstructive and useless......and worse if they get water in them because they won't self-drain. I was up to the top of my waders and I could still use this one. It has small drain holes in the four corners......could be plugged if I wished......which I don't. Water entry is slow...wave action doesn't fill it quickly. Drains slowly too....but fast enough that I just forgot about it. The cones kept the line well managed and no line movement or sloshing if water was present. The only thing I have to add is that my friend from FL.....Serge Thomas......showed up and he brought a basket he had bought for $20.....and it was the exact same basket!! Except his did not have the corner drain holes drilled, which we did. Serge is the most persistently money conscious, bargain-hunting guy I know and is a constant source of info on where to get the best equipment for the least money. The "my $50/his $20" basket ratio is about typical. The $75 chinese fly reels he turned me onto are in their 6th season of Florida/Cape Cod fishing and still, with my minimum maintenance schedule, looking and working flawlessly. Soooo.....there IS a deal on these baskets out there if you search for it. The size and low-sided silhouette also fit nicely into my carry-on and then got filled with equipment I didn't want to check, like reels, etc. That's my take on it. I hate stripping baskets in general, but I'm the guy who did NOT hook a giant trevally I saw coming 2 minutes ahead of time.....because I did not have a basket. The only thing worse than a stripping basket is what happens when you don't have one. But this one I am actually warming up to neutral about.
  12. This thread made me think about what the ideal stripping basket, for me, would be. The problem I had when I used an enclosed basket was that it was too deep. It HAS to be deep if it is to keep water/waves out.....since it doesn't drain. But....then it starts floating up and the top is too high when wading at waist depth. For me and my fishing style.....didn't work. So, I concluded, I wanted a shallow basket that gives me deeper wading options. But then it swamps and has to drain! Then I thought about cones and other line-stabilizing devices, which I have never bothered to put on my dishpan. OK, I got it. The perfect, for me, basket. Shallow, cones, drains. I was in the local Cabelas yesterday buying a few last minute details.....and BINGO! There it was. The World Wide Sportsman stripping basket, $50. It is relatively small, the back and sides are low, while the front is higher.....which IS functional.........keeps out more waves, but doesn't interfere with hands during stripping, but low sides defend you against the serious weight of flooding. And, it has small drain holes in the four corners, which could be enlarged if I found that necessary, as well as small holes through the top of the cones....yes, cones. I'm going back to buy one and give it a roll.
  13. I've never completely understood the arguments that the line/basket must/ought to be completely dry........ergo SB's with no holes at all.....and it seems I am always up to my armpits. How deep or how much water the line must be lifted out of for the shoot is not, in my world, a black and white thing, but inevitably infinite shades of grey. Having an inch or two of water in the SB is not that big a deal compared to it sinking to the bottom in 4 feet of water, not to mention all the surface and bottom sh*t it can accumulate. The only problem with tht is the sloshing of water around in the basket tends to tangle the line....arguing for cones or stiff mono points. I have lost shots at permit, for example, because my line was totally dry and the friction on the stripping guides totally squelched the shoot. Wet line is better than dry line....to a point, and it is that point we all try and manage as best possible. But then, I am a "short head-long shoot" casting proponent, so managing the running line for a clean shoot is more important. On the other hand, get hit by one breaking wave or boat wake that fills a deep, enclosed basket strapped tightly to your chest and you have a sudden, BIG problem. It is, in the end, all compromise and trade-offs. Re: the specific question I have a relatively shallow SB (a plastic dish pan)....with lots of bottom holes, and hike it up as I get deeper. When the SB gets up to the top of my waders it doesn't work anymore because it's flooded and the line floats out of it then I swing it around behind me and begin looping the shooting line to my mouth in short loops. Seems to me that the line loop in mouth talent is a very old one that was promoted 50-60 years ago here in the PNW by steelheaders using mono shooting line and heads.....and before anyone even thought of a stripping basket. I have virtually never seen anyone (else) doing it in 50 years. It is al old trick I learned 60 years ago and pull out every once in awhile when it solves a problem and keeps me in the game playing out in front of me And, in fact, given the improvement in line technology that has seriously reduced both innate memory coiling.....and quick and simple rod spinning to eliminate roll-casting-induced coils, if it weren't for the tendency for the (now) well behaved dangling line loops collecting surface weeds, I would have even less reason to use a basket at all.
  14. Oh.....to be 16 again..... 2 months ago I posted the picture of my #2 grandson with his > 12# largemouth bass he caught on a public, but secret, lake near San Diego. Sooooo......yesterday he was sitting on his paddleboard out past the breaker line (San Diego) while his girlfriend was surfing, idly casting a plastic-tailed jig......when......wham! ss 25# White Sea Bass, a fish that was fished to almost extinction 50 years ago, think delicious here, now making a comeback. Also, a fish that I have never even seen, much less caught or tasted.
  15. I am all booked at this point. Capt. Gottlieb is a new name to me. We are quite familiar with both Capt. Ellis and LeClair, but I can't tell you whether they are still actively guiding.