bbfish

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About bbfish

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  1. I dont travel much to fish for striped bass, no need for me to. Saturday afternoon was the first time all year ive made it out of raritan bay past the tip of the hook to fish for them, just havent needed to leave. In the fall when fish start migrating from out east I'll run out long island to intercept, but other than that ill stick to the bay and down to deal/asbury. The only times I really get any more than 10-15 miles away from atlantic highlands marina is for tuna. Come to think of it, last time i was more than 15 miles from port on my boat @Eric_S and company found me after i had just smashed my face into my dash at 30 mph and was limping home to superglue my face back together. White knuckle charters isnt for the faint of heart.
  2. You certainly dont need to troll to find them. Most guys who are plugging in the bay know where the fish should be staged up during the different seasons, or atleast have a decent idea of where to start looking. I think alot of people dont really put together that their are patterns and think that "fish swim; theyre here today they might not be here tomorrow." Honestly couldn't be farther from the truth, 95% of the time the fish will be in that same area day in and day out for days/weeks. If you make one pass by where you had them yesterday and theyre not there, it doesnt mean they werent just 100 yards to the side.The amount of times we've heard "the fish are near X but arent pluggable" is very very high. In my opinion theyre all plugable, you just need to throw what they want to eat. There are also alot of people who just dont know any different; Their dad taught them to troll so thats what they do kind of deal. I dont really care what they do as long as they're not in the way. The only thing that bothers me about the weekend warrior trolling types is i dont think they really understand how much a running engine slows down a bite. You can be bailing fish every cast with them blowing bunker out of the water on top and then 2 or 3 trollers come around and all the sudden the fish wont be on top any more, and then a few more show up and the bite is done in a short time. Theyll pick their handful of fish and be happy as a clam without knowing they could have had 2 dozen. Thats not an exaggeration, when the bite is on, you'll put far greater numbers in a boat plugging than trolling. This is the main reason I try to avoid weekend mornings at all costs. I was a surf fisherman first I know what its like to make 300 casts in a row and im fine doing that. Alot of guys seem to be unwilling and would rather have the boat in gear and use the engines to power their baits instead of their arms/backs/hands, which is fine, everyone has a different opinion of what they enjoy. A mojo is nothing but an oversized bucktail with a shad body on it. If you have the gear to throw an 8 oz 9" shad you can make the same presentation. Very often well have someone troll by when we hook up, theyll stop and throw whatever is on their spinning rod for 2 or 3 casts only to give up and move on not realizing that I got that fish on my 30th cast. Alot of non surf fisherman seem to not understand how much profile can affect a fishes attention, alot of times guys will have a spinning rod at the ready but will have a 4" shad on and the fish are taking down whole adult bunker. It can be alot of work but once you figure out the depth/profile/retreive you can usually string together a nice bite without moving much. Lets also not forget fishfinders. Theyre not a magic bullet, but are absurdly helpful. Edit: just to put less hate on trollers, lets also not forget that if youre bringing people that dont often fish its just an easier way to connect without your guests fouling up your gear. Lots of guys in the bay on weekends seem to have guests on their boat. Reeling in a hooked fish is much easier than handing them a heavy conventional baitcaster and expect them to know how to throw and work a 4 oz diving swimmer.
  3. I love both surf fishing and boat fishing. If you take away the trolling (you wont find any trolling gear on my boat, or any boat i frequent for that matter) they are much more similar than you'd think. Plugging structure is pretty much the same, its surprising how many surf fishing guys step on a boat and think that all the sudden they need to fish differently. They're the same exact fish, you just have much better access to them. Just need some offerings that can be fished much deeper than you might have in your surf plug bag. Luckily on a boat you can carry many more baits without a worry about storage space. Truth be told besides some of the more massive plugs I have on hand, lots of what I'm throwing is constantly moved from my boat boxes into my surf bag back and forth. I honestly think boat fishing has made me a much, much better all around fisherman than I was previously, simply because I get to interact with more fish, and quite frankly bigger fish, frequently. Since I have better access to fish I get to see more of what works and what doesn't in certain conditions. I live quick bike ride to the bayshore, so out of simplicity I can scratch the itch quite easily if I dont feel like launching the boat, and dont get me wrong I have HUGE respect for guys that grind it out night after night in the surf. It takes a certain kind of dedication to pull it off. I've lived that, and the rest of my life suffered because of it: work, relationships, social interaction etc. Rolling into work on 2 hours sleep with bloodshot eyes, torn up hands and a mind thats telling you to just drop what youre doing and sleep, and then realizing the tide is going to line up even better than night and doing it all over. It can be pretty brutal and im glad that part of my life is in the past. Now I can almost guarantee launching the boat and plugging decent fish every time, April through november. While dealing with boats certainly has its drawbacks (lets be honest boat maintenance can be a nightmare), I can firmly say that I'm in this to catch fish and still live a normal life.
  4. Very cool info. Is there a way to specifically target tigers? Or is it more of just weeding through all the blues/browns/whatever else is out there until you find the monster your looking for?
  5. I honestly didn’t think tigers made it up here until last year while jigging bluefin one about 8-10 feet cruised right by the boat. Seeing those stripes was one of the coolest moments I’ve had offshore. On another trip I saw what looked like a submarine on the fishfinder, a few seconds later look over the gunwale and a big, BIG, great white is slowly cruising up and turned sideways right under the boat. Released a small over bluefin about 20 minutes later that had some damage to its gills from a plug (we had already kept our over so we had to release it) and the poor thing swam off on the surface bleeding into the distance. About 30 seconds later, we all saw it, a gigantic explosion of white water right where the poor thing was headed. Like 10-15 feet of white water. It’s a different place out there, and to think something that powerful can be found in a few feet of water inshore.
  6. This is exactly my take. The whole “sharks are misunderstood” did well to bring back their populations by changing public opinion that they arent man eating machines but let’s get one thing straight. Even if a great white “accidentally” rips your torso in half, does it really matter what the intentions were? Im all for shark populations rebounding, just like any species. I’m sure a lot of bites are exploratory/“accidental” in nature, but it doesn’t matter too much. It’s obviously a rare occurrence but when you’re in their environment you’re potentially on the menu. Case closed.
  7. Sharks are formidable animals. I was a former division 1 swimmer who lifeguarded for about a decade and spent every minute of free time surfing when I was younger, I was in the ocean quite literally all the time. I didnt think about them much but thought if a shark showed interest in me I could "punch it in the nose" like you might hear on shark week. The last 10 years or so of my life have been pretty much dedicated to fishing, inshore and offshore, so I've had my fair amount of encounters with them. The more I get acquainted with them the more I realize how mistaken I was about being able to punch em in the nose and the less likely I am to be submerged in the ocean. Theyve proven to be powerful and dangerous even when they're half dead after a 30 minute fight. Fully rested and in their element if a shark really wants to fck with you, there is not much you could do to stop it. That being said if youre wetsuiting several nights a week I would say you are on the far end of the spectrum of shark fear. I know it would be in my mind 100% of the time. The likelyhood for you getting attacked is certainly higher than your average weekend warrior on their beach trip, but probably still fairly small. Good on your for doing it, im sure its alot of fun but I know my paranoia would take hold quickly.
  8. Alot of the time i dont think it matters much what kind of action you put into it so your father certainly wasn't wrong. Sometimes they seem to react a little bit more to the fast jigging in my experience.
  9. Honestly a straight retrieve can work just like bass fishing, I just like to really, really slow it down to keep it in front of their face as long as I can, almost constantly pulsing the rod tip. That’s why using such a light weight jighead works well. You said you and your little guy have been freshwater fishing? Just use your bass gear, you don’t need a super long cast from a surf rod. When I first started I used a st croix mojo bass rod rated to .5 oz and a 3000 sized shimano with 10 lb braid. Easy setup to use, especially for a youngster.
  10. you definitely want it up above the bottom, but just a touch.
  11. The Bayshore will have fluke in the summer, as will the Oceanside. For consistent action go with a light jighead, I use a 1/4 or 3/8 oz jighead. About a foot or so above the jighead I’ll put a dropper loop with a 3-5/0 baitholder. Pick up some 3-4” gulp swimming mullets, put on on the jighead and one on the teaser hook above. Cast at anything that looks interesting, rocks, holes, points, current breaks, pilings, edges etc. Cast close to them, I’m not saying 6’ away, More like 6”. These things can be on open sand but love to hang very, very tight to structure. Let it sink and slowly sweep the rod up with quick little taps, drop the tip and reel in the slack, rinse-repeat keeping the boats as close to the bottom as you can. Fishing for fluke isn’t exactly like bass where you can expect to leave bait on the bottom and have a fluke swim up and eat it. They’re mostly stationary and you’ll have to bring the bait to them. Keep moving and casting, you’ll know if they’re there almost right away; the smaller ones will usually be piled up together. Expect to catch mostly shorts with the occasional keeper mixed in. if you really need to be stationary, catch a snapper with a little snapper popper with a tube or tiny cast master. Put it on a smile live bait hook cast out and wait. Most of the time this is a little slower fishing but a fresh live bait can cull some bigger fish.
  12. I picked up a light conventional a couple years ago down at their shop to leave at my folks place in Florida. It’s a decent quality rod, have landed a bunch of jacks and snook on it with no issues. Just a heads up most rods built/sold in Fl are much slower than a lot of the rods you’ll see fished up north. Nothing wrong with that, just a little bit different.
  13. Giglios is a great shop. My buddies opened up a shop down in Long Branch called Tak Waterman. I do a lot of the same style fishing as the guys that run the place so they always have the kind of gear I need/want.
  14. it’s not illegal if you don’t get caught!
  15. I feel like its a good idea to get another opinion anytime someone suggests opening up your chest. The guy could be right but it would sure make me nervous. Good luck man I hope it all turns out ok.