Jonesy02719

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About Jonesy02719

  • Rank
    Elite Member

Converted

  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Wrenching & Fishing
  • What I do for a living:
    Ecowarrior

Profile Fields

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fairhaven, MA
  1. I worked in a restaurant in my youth that served lobsters. Obviously dead, floppy lobsters were thrown in the trash. The claws and tails were ripped off the sleepy ones and thrown in a 40 gallon pot. That’s what was used for lazy man’s lobster and lobster rolls. Lobster rolls also were fortified with frozen/thawed lobster meat. Every once and a while, a dead/bad one would go in. Even happened with steamed lobsters on occasion. When they are truly dead, their meat takes on an ammonia odor, and sometimes the meat simply turns to mush. You pretty much know right away when you’ve encountered a cooked (previously dead) lobster.
  2. I’m wondering if anyone can provide a regulatory citation on that “legally shoot you” business.
  3. Snappers can live in brackish water and estuaries, but obviously do not favor salt water. Since they can live in estuarine environments, what you see there is something that got too far downstream. I’ve seen snappers in New Bedford harbor, and know other people who have seen the same.
  4. I have also had extremely positive interactions. I called them looking for advice on a winter rake and they helped me with the best rake to go with and which shop had them in stock. I now have 3 Ribb rakes, and I wouldn’t think of going with another brand. I also happen to think they outfish any other rake I’ve used.
  5. Make sure you have the correct one (800-632-8075) Not the Environmental Strike Force one that is screencapped above.
  6. DO NOT use this link. This reports environmental violations to the Department of Environmental Protection. INSTEAD, call the Massachusetts Environmental Police directly at: 800-632-8075
  7. No, that’s not the case at all. People in the same household/family members always could go boating. “Solitary” fishing was always encouraged. But there is nothing saying anything about you and your wife launching your boat or fishing.
  8. Gotta wonder about the rationale. In my neck of the woods, I see a lot of NY, NJ and CT plates around the charters. They come to fish Buzzards Bay for scup and sea bass. Soon, they’ll be here in droves. Two of those places were worse off than Mass, and now we’re welcoming them in with open arms? And like you said, I can’t even take neighbor, coworker or friend out?
  9. I made and tried monkfish for the first time this week. I made a few batches of “Poor Man’s Lobster” from one of Dave “Pops” Masch cookbooks.
  10. I would get the shellfish permit. Fishing is a right. I’d skip the beach permit (and opt to pay per visit). If the social distancing thing continues past May, it will absolutely disrupt most municipal beach openings. I can’t see how they will even be able to secure lifeguard positions for a broken up season.
  11. Yes, you should get a license. Though parking lots are currently closed, I’m not sure any beach can be “closed” to fishing. Baker has actually stated that “solitary fishing” is allowed. It’s a pretty big deal that our individual right to fish is called out specifically. The Office of Fishing and Boating says their access points still remain open. https://www.mass.gov/alerts/department-of-fish-and-game-offices-are-closed-to-the-public#1466471
  12. It’s here: https://www.mass.gov/doc/may-1-2020-masks-and-face-coverings/download
  13. There is no such bill being considered by the State legislature, and no such law on the books. #fakenews
  14. Well that’s the problem. It leaves discretion to multiple levels of government/authority. It’s bound to be abused.
  15. I will not comply.