makaha

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About makaha

  1. ...probably heard it on the Internet.....
  2. This is the real story about the commercial season, i.e., especially "the amount of smaller fish that were around and the other was that the larger fish were beyond the 3 mile line more than not"
  3. As of Jan 1-RI is 500 pounds per vessel per week As of Jan 18-NY is 150 pounds daily NJ is also open
  4. As I indicated above, the amount of menhaden offshore, is large, as I've heard from first hand observations; plus new thinking is they are actually spawning off of our coastline, besides down south, near the Gulf Stream....I've actually seen schools when going back and forth to Block Island and beyond...never seen that in close to 50 years; plus the amount off of PTown/ Chatham last year, and especially the year before.
  5. ...a lot of the increased allocation by ASMFC, along the Coast, is going to the bait industry/ bait suppliers..... The amount of menhaden being seen by offshore/ charter fishermen 10 miles off the SNE coast is eye-opening; I had a charter captain telling me he saw schools of menhaden (10 miles of Block/Montauk) being herded and corralled by sharks(like bass/ blues do inshore)...he said it was amazing. A local MA seine boat (bait) has been working several miles off Montauk the last couple of years. Menhaden grow fast-life span of 3 years...the only area the reduction boats can work is Virginia/Maryland (don't know about Maine, NH); Long Island Sound, NJ, RI, MA, CT are off limits
  6. ....most bass released at the SW corner of Block do not live; especially when using light spinning gear. Believe me, I have been fishing out there since that fishery started years ago (replacing rock hopping close to the island, slinging eels or needlefish). Your talking about fighting a fish in at least a 1.5-25 kt current for several minutes....its a fallacy that the rec community has put on the public. Small fish live, usually, but not these big fish, that are out in this deep water (35'-55')......end of soapbox rant.......
  7. True. A friend of mine, who commercially cast nets pogies for bait and tackle shops, started getting orders from lobstermen, this year; cheap and more plentiful. This past season, I have been giving any leftover pogies I have at the end of the day to one of my lobsterman friends, i.e., the guy loves them and work well (plus they're free..lol)
  8. That has been the case in RI for several years where RIDEM has implemented a Narragansett Bay Management Area keeping seiners out of those specific areas, i.e. Providence River, East Greenwich Bay, Bristol Harbor, etc. Also, seiners can't fish anywhere in Buzzards Bay and, I believe, certain areas of Boston Harbor. Also all of Long Island Sound is off limits and a lot of NJ inshore waters are off limits, i.e., only bait boats with basket loading, no vacuum pumps..... True...but what about SW Corner, SW Ledge at Block? or Chatham, Stellwagon? discount the pogies out there this year, which was probably a result of the recent increase in menhaden biomass... As I stated before, I know what you are stating, i.e., and I wholeheartedly agree with PROPER MANAGEMENT, but we need to allow equal share of the resource WHEN that resource is in good shape....
  9. Believe me, I hear where your're coming from....but it s a lot easier just to buy a tote/ barrel of pogies. Also, by-catch either way (I have been using a menhaden gill net for at least 40 years, so i know where I'm coming from. Last 10 years, almost always a cast net, i.e, much more bait around).....Reduction boats?? keep them down in MD, NC, Virginia....bait guys, throw them a LITTLE more quota just up here (NJ, NY, MA, RI, ME)
  10. Have you seen the amount of menhaden (adult and peanuts) in this area (SNE) the last couple of years??? I've been on the water for over 40 years, and the menhaden population rivals the numbers back in the late 70's. I believe ASMFC has manage this species properly, i.e., not to say that reasonable limits/ quotas should still be implemented. But lets not be to hasty in denying ALL parties a share in this fishery (specifically the bait industry). The life cycle of this species, at most, is 3-4 years from birth to death...they are a highly reproductive fish. As an aside, numbers that were seen offshore of this area (20 miles off the SNE coast) were amazing; also, I never seen the amount of menhaden i saw this year off of Chatham/ PTown, CC Bay, besides the amount in all their usual haunts... As of now, the doom and gloom predictions of this fishery failed to appear; I believe ASMFC has done a good job managing the fishery..... My feeling is that a little quota leeway FOR the bait industry, would not be a bad idea, i.e., i believe the present biomass could sustain the fishery.
  11. ...probably end up close to a 100,000 lbs over, by the the time all the late dealer reports come in; next year will be a shorter season then this year....MA DEP should be lambasted for this....no fault but their own for not going after dealers who, by law, must report on a "timely" basis....
  12. The same would happen up here in S New England, with river herring, or as they are called locally, "buckies".....small bunches would swarm toward sandy edges of the ponds they would swim into, creating a helluva spectacle; in fact, back in the day (when it was legal to catch them), we would use a small, beat up, cast net, to get them for bass bait....that way, we wouldn't have to stand in the feeder streams, side by side with other anglers, waiting for them to either swim upstream, or downstream after spawning....
  13. Exactly, i.e., keep it simple and give the recent reg changes a chance; a few good YOY classes will do wonders.......those, that are supposedly pushing for more exploitation (and most people in the know, know who that faction is....) are not going to achieve their desires, i.e., too much push from the general public. I talk to many fish managers (both sides of the coin), i.e., mtgs, letters, hearings, etc, and they DEFINITELY "know which way the wind blows"......most, want to keep a steady pace to achieve less mortality until the biomass reaches another peak, then adjust accordingly......it worked before and it will work again.
  14. I have been fishing for bass (67 yo),i.e., recreationally and R&R commercial since 1972; i went through the down times of the early 80's ( even then, the fish were there if you knew what you were doing)......suffice it to say, right now is NO WHERE near as dire as it was back then. Before the downfall of the late 70's, the crux of the fishery was, as it is now, mostly the effects of the large number of rec fishermen, and also, the tremendous pressure of the Southern net fishery on juvenile fish, i.e., lengths limits of 12" in MD, DE, NC, etc. Thankfully, ASMFC stepped in and set up a management plan for bass where there really wasn't one at the time...just local, minimal state regs. And lo and behold the striped bass flourished, and became most coastal fishermen's favorite "whipping boy".....several industries have been built on the back of the fishery, and i am not talking the commercial fishery. Please stop the drama about the demise of the striped bass.....THERE are too many regs, plans, scientists, media, etc., etc., to ever let the fishery return to the all out free-for-all, that typified the 70's; there are too many checks and balances to let the fishery become "crashed". As happens with most fisheries, there are high and lows with biomass, be it fishing pressure, climate, water quality, etc. The early 2000's bass fishery was stupid; anybody could cast a pencil popper on a sunny mid summer afternoon, and catch fish after fish; that ain't the reality of the long term health of any fishery....... Rant over, time to duck and cover.....
  15. Love the guy with the pitchfork...kinda like Westport Fish, back when Arnold owned it.........