NYNistler

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About NYNistler

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    Syƶ rautaa ja paskantaa kettinkiƤ

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    Afton MN

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  1. Good morning all. I want to say thanks for the suggestions. I spoke to an accountant last week and got the low down. We will be electing to be taxed as an S-Corp, which will keep quite a bit of money in our pocket. I have an appointment next week to speak with a financial advisor about retirement accounts. It's been an interesting education, and I thank you for your solid advice.
  2. Agreed. Everything you describe is my dad. Had 2 Fords and swore off Ford because of all the problems he had. Bought a Ram and sold it 3 years later, "before it started rusting." Bought another one, and it had problems day 1. Took the dealership 6 months to get the problems straight. I bought a 2008 Sequoia for my growing family in 2017, it had 160K miles. Still drive it and it runs like a champ. Decided to buy a used Tundra 2 years ago. Got a 2013 with 100K. I haven't had any problems with it and would only consider buying another Toyota.
  3. The kits I purchased are Halco 4' T8 Type B Dble End BB CW 10P - the only require removing the ballast and reconnecting the wires, you don't have to replace the sockets. It was a 10 pack at Home Depot with all of the other tube lights. This kit was 10 lamps for $46. The other kits i saw at HD are single ended. You still need to remove the ballast and reconnect the wire, but I would have needed to replace the sockets with the ones that come in the kit. These kits were 2 lamps for $20.
  4. I did the lamp replacement, and the kit did not come with new sockets. The existing sockets worked just fine. I only needed to remove the ballasts and rewire. It took me 5 minutes per fixture, with 4 lamper each. I cannot image replacing the entire fixture would be that quick, easy, and cheap - other than my time, it cost me $46.
  5. We had 3 fluorescent tube fixtures, each with 4 tubes, in our basement. I had thought about getting them converted to led but never had a pressing need. The ballast in one went bad last week, so I texted my electrician relative for advice. He usually talks over my head, because he understands electric, and I do not. When I finally deciphered what he said, I realized that you can cut the wires on the ballast, remove it, reconnect the wires on ones end of the fixture to the live wire and the wires on the other end of the fixture to the neutral wire, and put new LED tubes in the fixture. I bought ten tubes at HD for $46. The first 4-tube fixture took me about an hour, the other two took 5 minutes. I learned that could also use plug-n-play tubes that will used the ballast, but they are slightly more expensive and use more electricity. Plus, I don't think they would work in a fixture with a bad ballast. While at HD, I also found 4-port push-in wire connectors. I'd never used them but will never use anything else unless space is an issue (like in a box). Those little babies made the job quick and easy!
  6. As a side note, Toyota revealed EV concepts yesterday, including a Taco-sized truck. It will be interesting to see specs on that when they are released.
  7. Hey, you're certainly entitled to your opinion, and my logic on relevance very well could be wrong. Personally, I would never buy a 2021 either. I have a 2013, so why would I pay more money for a new truck that essentially is the same as my 2013, or even a 2008? Up to the 2022, I agree with you, the Tundra probably was living on the past reputation to a certain extent. So, I wasn't attacking your opinion, I simply don't think your opinion of the 2021 is relevant to the conversation about a 2022. The truck has gone through a complete redesign/rebuild. So, no, I don't believe your personal assessment after test driving a 2021 is relevant to the question about the 2022, IMHO. Your other comments are simple misinterpretations of what I wrote. I never said a 2022 would be reliable, and I certainly didn't claim it would be more reliable that others.
  8. True, but, what you spend on tax is completely relative to where you live. That may be an added cost for many, but it's not a fixed cost. For me it still puts the $60K truck around $70K, not $80-$90K. That's still a considerable difference.
  9. I ran quick numbers on a $60K truck, $0 down, and 2.49% interest. The cost of interest over 72 months is about $4,700. Same terms at 60 months is about $3,900 in interest. So, the difference is around $800, and the actual cost of the vehicle with interest is between $64K and $65K, not $80-$90K. Your way of amortizing either calculates at an interest rate around 10% or more, or you are including other expenses that are irrelevant to the interest rate.
  10. I am also not brand loyal - driven Ford, Chevy, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Jeep. In my experience, Toyota is no cheaper in build quality than the rest of the disposable automobiles any other manufacturers produce. The difference I've noticed is that most Toyotas are very reliable and last a long time. Plus, for those of us that comtemplate spending 50K on a truck, it would likely not be used exclusivelvy as a beach buggy. Which Toyota are you basing your comments on, and what other vehicles are you comparing it to? It's probably safe to assume it is not the 2022 Tundra, which would pretty much make your comments irrelevant.
  11. Anyone looking at the new Tundras? I'm usually not the type to buy a new vehicle, but this one has me thinking. I'm currently in a 2013 Rock Warrior, and love it. What are you seeing as pros and cons in the 22s?
  12. Yup. My entire reason for asking the question is that politicians set up the system to benefit themselves. But they make the rules so convoluted and hard to understand that the average Joe doesn't know they exist. Over the course of the last few years running my own businesses, I have figured out that the average NYNistler can and should take advantage of those rules too. I'm doing my due diligence to find out what is legal and how to do it so I can keep as much of my hard earned money in my pocket instead of someone else putting my money in their pocket.
  13. ME: J&J vaccine - no reaction whatsoever. J&J booster - no reaction whatsoever. Wife: Pfizer vaccine - sore arm. Pfizer booster - fever, chills, body aches, swollen lymph nodes for 4 days. Kid 1: Moderna vaccine - sore arm for days. Kid 2: Moderna vaccine - no reaction whatsover.
  14. I will eventually. There are a lot of intelligent people lurking in SOL. Last time I had a question about finances, I got some really good out-of-the-box suggestions here. It allowed me to see things from different angles that the typical tax advisor or financial planner would not think of. If nothing else, it arms me with information to share with the advisor to review options. The fact is, I got better advice on SOL that from a finance-related forum that I am on. I found the fish people to be smarter than the money people!
  15. If that were to work, that takes care of year one, but it wouldn't provide a long-term advantage to our tax situation, which is why I'm wondering about contributions to a retirement account. Contributions to a retirement accout also seems like it would be easier to control our adjusted gross income and ensure we don't hit the next tax bracket.