Wee Hooker

BST Users
  • Content count

    210
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Wee Hooker

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Converted

  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    flyfishing, airguns, targetshooting, paddling, rowing, boatbuilding
  • What I do for a living:
    Engineer/manager
  1. Man, we must be related. That describes me to a tee !
  2. Again , I thank you for the sound advice and encouragement. I think this will be doable . Dave
  3. You are right and I stand corrected. What I meant to say is that these features shouldn't be considered more important than boat design. I've seen allot of people buy a 9 or 10' no name yak from a box store and end up disappointed , wet and regretting they didn't save their money for a better suited craft..
  4. Thanks Gents, all good advice I'm sure. Didn't really think about my casting style or rod action . I do have a 8.5' custom rod that I built on a steelhead blank some time ago. It will only throw a 1.25 oz or so but it is parabolic and light weight. Maybe I'll start there and work up. Looks like I'll have plenty of time to mull it over while we thaw out.
  5. Don't choose your boat based on showroom price and or how easy it is to transport/ store in the garage. Pick a boat based on it's suitability to how and where you will fish. Consider speed, stability, layout, weight, quality and reputation. If pressed, my suggestion for a bay boat would be to look for a good used Tarpon 120 / 140 or an OK Trident 13/15. Either of these choices won't leave you handicapped or broke. p.s I've been happily fishing from a variety of yaks for 20+ years and have still have no taste for the Hobie cool-aide.
  6. Been out of this a while but I'll throw in my 2 cents. First I'm up for a 1 fish/day limit as I only occasionally keep one anyway. 28" is Ok I guess but I'd like to see it higher. That said, I'd argue ( as others have done here) that one fish/day is overkill for most folks who look at this as a sport vs paycheck/trip to the market. Maybe I'm idealistic but I'd actually be supportive of something along the lines of each SW license would come with a number of traceable tags (say 10?) that would need to be immediately inserted through the gills of any fish to be kept. ( Think deer tag system without the weigh-in. Get caught without a tag installed and your hammered). As long as I'm dreaming, I'd like to see a slot limit to force the release of fish with the best genetics.
  7. I've been out of surf casting for a good 7-8 years now. Mainly because I've had some shoulder issues that made casting painful. Shoulder seems somewhat better these days so I'd like to give it a shot again. The thought is of keeping it somewhat light. i.e. keep my lures to 2 oz +/- .5 . I do have a nice Lamiglass Ron Aura Pro 10', 3/4-2.5 that I retired but in looking around today, it seems there are much lighter choices. So what would you folks suggest for a good general purpose plug throwing rod in this range ? Location would be mostly beach's and coastline along Westort MA to Newport RI. ( No Canal work). So, should I just use the Lami or try something new? If I went new, I'd like to keep it in the $200-300 range unless I'm buying allot more performance/weight loss. p.s. Ive done some search's here and know there are some good things said about Tica, Tsunami Elite and TFO but to be honest, it's like drinking from a fire hose to get opinions on ease of casting. Thanks in advance for sharing your knowledge.
  8. Not sure on how the hobie is constructed but you want to find a spot that you can run a cable or padlock bolt through. Preferably something surrounded by steel and not made wholly of plastic. If there are none , then buy a 3/4"-1" stainless Pad eye (or similar) and through bolt it through the hull. You can then get a good padlock and heavy motorcycle cable and secure one end to your truck bed. I loop mine through a permanent tiedown point in the bed rail and thread it back through itself. ( Again, if you have no solid point, add a padeye. ) Then just lock the other loop to the pad eye /secure point on your yak with good lock. This is what i do anyway. it's not 100% infallible to a determined thief with bolt cutters with a but it keeps the honest people honest. Couple of other points: I use the same lock point for securing the yak to my rack in the yard. If you use a bed extender, make sure that is locked in/up while your on the water. Make sure you keep a spare key for all those locks hidden in the truck. (Nothing more frustrating than driving to the water only to realize you can't get the yak wet. )
  9. Sorry for the extra post.
  10. double post. Please delete
  11. New York comes to mind. Send her to New York City and you can go to the Adirondacks. Seriously, you both get what you want without pulling at each other to do things the other hates. The first time hurts but now my wife and I love separate vacations.
  12. I always tell people to start with an 8 wt. It's less tiring , easier to learn on, and makes the average fish (read: 5# schoolie) allot more fun. ( You remember FUN don't you, it's what we all start out looking for before being corrupted by dreams of 50# fish on monster tackle.) Additionally, an 8 wt is VERY capable for 90% of the inshore fishing that most of us do. Lastly, it's my experience that when somebody ignores the advice to go light, it seems like they are either giving it up or buying a second rod within the year.
  13. Carp on the fly is actually on my to do list I used to fish for them some years back (up in the Merrimack R) with UL tackle. Tey can be a real ball! You may have inspired me to make this the year! p.s. I found the vintage tackle very interesting. Notice how that rod loaded in close and from out far to throw whatever line he needed. Just goes to show that newer isn't always better! Thanks for sharing! It was very inspiring in this weather.
  14. Life is what happens while you plan your fishing time.
  15. I have but only at night/predawn.. I've heard the DEP folks will move you off once the beach goes start to show up ( Read: by the thousands!) To the East of the campground is a short walk to Gooseberry Island (connected by a causeway.) That can also produce some decent fish if you know what to look for. Like any beach it's best to walk it in daylight and look for the rips, holes , bars, reefs, etc.. Then come back and fish it on a good tide in low light.