isleomaniac

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About isleomaniac

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Converted

  • About Me:
    Worm Hatch Inspector
  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    fishing, diving, surfing, writing
  • What I do for a living:
    Retired

Profile Fields

  • Gender
  • Location
    Cape Cod

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  1. Cinder Worm Hatch #1 & #2, (4/20 & 4/21) Since we had a mild winter and spring this season, I started my worm hatch checks a week sooner this year in April, because I had missed these early hatches in 2015 and again in 2018. I had 3 locations on my list, and found worms at 64˚, at my last stop. This turned out to be the earliest hatch that I had found to date, so if nothing else, I was at least on the ball this season. The same thing happened two days in a row, worms but still no fish present yet. Things were ready to start happening, then we had a cold night that dropped water temperatures 6˚, so that helped to put an end to the early hatches, along with 3 cool, cloudy, and rainy days. It was just as well, so to give the stripers more time to migrate in. Cinder Worm Hatch #3, (5/1/21) Found my 3rd hatch yesterday, Saturday May 1. I arrived late after checking two other locations first, and while taking a water temp, witnessed a guy doing surgery on a schoolie to retrieve his treble hook. The fish was mangled. I asked him if there were any worms, and he said no. I asked another guy the same question and he also said no. I could clearly see swirling fish and the tiny wakes of worms further out. So I wadered up and headed out to a peninsula and was able to catch and release 3 schoolies easily on my worm fly with a single hook and a crushed barb. Cinder Worm Hatch #4, (5/2/21) Yesterday, Sunday with a half day of sun dropped the water temps 2 degrees at some locations. So I went late again to my third stop where the water temp only had dropped 1 degree, and found a mini hatch and a few stripers. I managed to catch one fish that was several inches larger than Saturdays fish, and fewer fish, maybe 6 or so, but they moved off and further out.
  2. Hey, it looks like you got a 4 fish slam there. I see you got the timing right for the white perch, at "late in the day." This is especially true for the larger sea run white perch, they are usually active, rising and swirling just before sunset in brackish salt ponds, an hour sooner on cloudy evenings. I caught and released this 16" fat female last May at 7:50 pm. So far this year I have caught 5 at 12-14 inches during a narrow 20 minute window just before dark. Those were caught on a #6 worm fly and a #8 san juan worm.
  3. Cinder Worm Hatches #5 & #6, (5/3/21) Today we only had a half-day of sun, so I thought that would be enough to keep the water temperature at 64˚. So I showed up at 5 p.m. with my kayak in tow to find a massive hatch already in progress. There were only a few small pods of stripers scattered here and there, instead of swirling on worms, they were just lazily patrolling around on the surface like finicky trout during a midge hatch. They were not interested in hitting today, but I managed to paddle ahead of one pod and cast just in front of the direction that they were headed in, and luckily got my one and only hookup. It was a 25-inch striper that put up a heck of a fight, so I was content with that today. I had an hour of day light left, so I thought that I should check another salt pond nearby that was a new location, so I could get some intel for the future. So I loaded up the yak, and headed a short distance down the road, parked and put on my knee boots for an easier walk in to the pond. The water temps ranged from 63 at the north end, to 62 in the middle and 61 at the south end. I found a few worms all along the western shoreline, but there were no fish present at all. The leisurely walk back to the car through this conservation area went along a sandy road covered with pine needles, very peaceful here strolling under the pines, with no houses in site, and no one else around. A successful outing for an early season worm hatch, and I was sure glad that the long winter was behind me, and that the fishing season was now in full swing. I felt lucky to be healthy, fully vaccinated, and alive.
  4. Yesterday, Sunday with a half day of sun dropped the water temps 2 degrees at some locations. So I went late again to my third stop where the water temp only had dropped 1 degree, and found a mini hatch and a few stripers. I managed to catch one fish that was several inches larger than Saturdays fish, and fewer fish, maybe 6 or so, but they moved off and further out. Three main factors and as many as nine variables go into solving the mystery of finding worm hatches. If you have plenty of time on your hands, and like mystery and challenge, go for it.
  5. Found my 3rd hatch yesterday, Saturday May 1. (The first 2 hatches on 4/20 and 4/21 no stripers were present, too early)? I arrived late after checking two other locations first, and while taking a water temp, witnessed a guy doing surgery on a schoolie to retrieve his treble hook. The fish was mangled. I asked him if there were any worms, and he said no. I asked another guy the same question and he also said no. I could clearly see swirling fish and the tiny wakes of worms further out. So I wadered up and headed out to a peninsula and was able to catch and release 3 schoolies easily on my worm fly with a single hook and a crushed barb.
  6. Month of May, any high tides will do. Don't wait for the moon tides, a number of other factors and variables are more important.
  7. Thanks for those reco's. I am still leary of going into any stores to buy stuff due to covid, so I have been ordering everything online. I was able to use some flexible Barge cement that I already had. After coloring the head and tail with a black sharpy I just used a tiny amount to those spots to help hold the rest of the materials together. Tiny San Juan worms, #s16, 14, and 12.
  8. Wondering if there is a waterproof glue that would remain flexible for tying small flies? I want to lightly coat the fine thread before wrapping.
  9. Does an old rabbit hunting truck count? My brother on the left, Grandfather in middle and me on the right. Us kids have beagles, and gramp has our old hound Chop. Candy and Diamond, the beagles made some music chasing rabbits. Circa late 50s.
  10. Saw several on nest poles today, and saw one snag a rainbow in a freshwater pond yesterday. They are here on the south side of the Cape.
  11. Here is a photo of a 16" fat female full of eggs getting ready to spawn, caught and released in a south side salt pond at sunset. Caught this one on a worm fly at a creek mouth while trying to catch stripers. They are fairly scarce now compared to years ago/60s.
  12. I caught a 22" tog from shore near a jetty along a deep channel. I was using a sinking line with an unweighted shrimp fly so I wouldn't catch the bottom. The tog chased it up, and when I saw it, then paused the fly and that is when he hit it. That is tan rabbit strip the main ingredient. The top fly is weighted, the bottom one is not.
  13. In Valdene's book "On The Water," A Fishing Memoir, the best chapter is the one where he begins a long friendship with Tom McGuane. The chapter is titled 'Tom and The Fat Boys.' They fished together in Montana for trout, and the Keys jumping tarpon, and trying to catch permit. Tom and the fat boys all "loved books and art and dogs and birds and fish an food and good-looking women."
  14. I have read McGuane's book "The Longest Silence" a number of times over previous winters. This winter I read "Salmon" by Mark Kurlansky which was excellent and I am sure I will read it again every winter. Also excellent reads for outdoorsmen are 3 books by Guy de la Valdene.
  15. I keep several copies of the Fishing, Fowling and Navigation Law/MassDEP M.G.L Chapter 91 in my vest: The public has a right to fishing and passage below the high water mark across private tidelands. It came in handy recently when a homeowner tried to kick us of of "his Marsh." I invited him to call the police which he did. I figured that the cop would not know about this law which he didn't, and so gave him a copy for his and the property owners education. The cop let us continue fishing and said he would look into the law. The owner has been kicking out fishermen. We stood our ground and called his bluff. If you let them get away with it, they will continue to harass you. That week, I had been called an A-hole 5 times at a couple of different locations. I called him Sir. Landings are a great place to get in a fight.