thill

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About thill

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  • Interests (Hobbies, favorite activities, etc.):
    Family, dogs, boats, fishing, fishing, fishing.....
  • What I do for a living:
    Builder, Kitchen and Bath Remodeler, Boat and outboard repair

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    Male
  • Location
    Virginia, USA
  1. Strange, but the pics I uploaded disappeared. Not sure why... Maybe it will come back later. Here is a youtube video of that fish being landed. Not sure if this is the right way to post it, but I'll try https://youtu.be/sbZdHi4YlLs -TH
  2. Yes, there is a difference in taste, based on size, as their diet changes. The smaller fish mostly eat silversides, and their flavor is more neutral - many describe them as, "sweeter." The bigger fish eat bunker, an oily, smelly baitfish, and their flesh is definitely more oily. Some describe the bigger fish as having a more "meaty" taste, whereas others say the bigger fish taste "stronger" which is not a compliment. Very often, regardless of what kind of fillet I give people, I get the comment that it "was the best fish they have ever eaten." This has included snapper bluefish fillets, which many supposedly do not like. In fact, several people told me I was wrong, when I told them it was bluefish, "because they HATE the taste of bluefish!" That being said there is a trick to getting the best out of your fish. First, you must cut the fish's throat while still alive, and allow it to bleed out, then immediately get the fish iced down, and finally clean and package it the same day. The bleeding part is VERY important with "oily" fish, such as bluefish and mackerel. And it definitely improves the flavor of larger stripers. Makes the meat noticeably whiter when your fillet them, and most report a "cleaner" flavor, after trying this method. Are the bigger fish for everyone? Definitely not. Usually, I release fish over 40", as I would rather keep fish in the 28-30" range. But when I don't get to go often, I keep a couple, and let the rest go. -TH
  3. double post again... Strange...
  4. Hey, Ben, long time! I hope all is well. I haven't fished much for the last few years, so I've stayed away from fishing sites, as they are just frustrating when you can't go. I hope to get out more this year. Already off to a good start, but we will have to see how things go. Albacized, Yes, the regs here are pretty tight, and you had better read and re-read the regulations and boundaries! In the VA bay, you can only fish for about a month in the spring, and then you aren't allowed to keep any striper from the July 1 through the end of November, and then only until Dec 31. In MD, in the spring, the upper Chesapeake portion of the Bay and all rivers are protected so the fish can spawn. After that comes "trophy season" where you are allowed ONE fish over 36" until most of the spawners are gone. Then (usually around May 15) they open it up to the 2 fish limit, with only 1 over 28". We don't get much time to catch the bigger fish, but it's nice to get a couple a year. -TH
  5. double post, sorry
  6. I live and fish in the Chesapeake Bay area of MD/VA. Here, we can catch big fish for a very short time in the spring, then they migrate north. Then, we get a shot at them in the fall, if they show up. All summer long, the vast majority of the fish are 12-24" long, as this is where they live until they start migrating at around 28". Because of this, the size limit in the summer is 19", 2 per person, only one of them over 28" allowed. So you get one big fish and one small one, or two small ones, if no big fish are caught. I went out yesterday, and we were catching a nice mix of fish between 16 and 29". Good fishing! One fish after another grabbed our jigs, and it was a beautiful, cool overcast day. Then, I felt a super-solid hit, and I knew it was a big fish. I struck hard, and my rod doubled and stopped cold, like I was hung on the bottom. ...Oh yes, this was big. I kept tight and held still, waiting. After what felt like a minute, the big fish shook it's head. My rod lifted and dropped violently. Oh, this was DEFINITELY a big fish! The big fish now realized that it had been hooked, and the battle began.. First the fish ran straight at me, trying to get slack so it could shake the hook. But I reeled like crazy and kept tight. Then it took off on a long run, screaming drag. I held on. It raced toward me again, but I kept pace, and finally it dove deep, turning to use the current to it's advantage. At one point, I felt my line hitting the rocks, and that was very concerning, but the line held. After about 10 minutes of back and forth in the current, the fish finally appeared, huge head, wide body, broom-like tail, a massive fish for the relatively short length of 45". It's funny how some fish can be so big or small for their relative length. My friend grabbed the fish's jaw, and realizing that he wasn't going to lift it one handed, he grunted as he used both hands to drag the fish up. The fish was big, but it was all spawned out, it's belly flaccid. I usually release fish this size, but I was here to get fish for family, so I kept it. Kind of sad, but it is what it is. Was looking at the two fish I kept, a 25" and the 45", and it struck me HOW MUCH bigger some fish are from others. I had been happy to catch 25" fish, then came the 45" fish. 25 vs.45 sounds like it should be twice as big, right? But in reality, it's probably 8 to 10 times as big. The attached picture says it all. The 25 incher looks like it's 12" long! Perspective is a funny thing. -TH
  7. I have caught under the Severn River bridge, off the rocks of the Naval academy, in Kent Narrows, off the jetty in Chesapeake Beach, on either side of Hoopers Island bridge on the Eastern Shore, all around Point Lookout State Park, and under the Lesner bridge in Virginia Beach. These are just a few spots. I'm sure there are many. -TH
  8. If this was in July, it must have been fresh, for him to cut some off of it for food... It would go rotten pretty quickly. That would be amazing if it swam all the way from the ocean. We see tuna at the CBBT, and a couple of miles up the bay, but Baltimore is crazy! I agree... Was suicide, for sure. The fish realized it was lost in B'more harbor, and decided to end it all. His inborn guidance system must have gone on the fritz. -TH
  9. It's been a long time, but I've caught stripers and blues off the end of the jetty using my 9/10 and a little white clouser. The best time is first light or just before dark. But it was frustrating. I would see a pod of fish busting bait, but always just out of my reach. Much easier from a boat, for sure. Those rental boats get you to the fish. Then the boat addiction starts. A slippery slope, for sure! I found that from shore, fishing Kent Narrows across the Bay Bridge was MUCH better than Sandy point. Especially with a fly rod. -TH
  10. Probably, the water is shallow, and the fish are scattered about. Bait has scent, and attracts the fish. Try using very small jigs, in the 1-2" size range. Similar to what you would use for crappie in fresh water. Baby curlytails and paddletails are effective. And a secret lure that works well up there is a 4-6" jelly worm, just like you use in fresh water fishing. We used to use purple ones at the mouth of the Severn river in the summer months, and nail keepers in the afternoons. -TH
  11. There are a lot of politics involved. Some people have tried, but more people oppose it. Trophy season is when the big fish visit us for a brief time before heading north for the year, so the window of opportunity to catch those fish is small. The idea is to time the season after the main spawn, but before the fish leave the area. Tricky, because temperature and rain affects the actual timing. So some years, people complain because a lot of pre-spawn fish are caught, and other years, everyone is complaining because the fish have come and gone before the season opened. Me, personally, I don't understand why the target is on the big fish. Why not allow guys one fish over 20", just like a month later. Most people will catch their fish and go home. If they get a big one, fine, but why FORCE them to chase only the big spawners? I'm sure there is a reason, but as for me, I just go when I can, and I catch what I can, and release what I can. I do kill one here and there, but there is more joy in releasing a big one to spawn, than in killing it, in my opinion. -TH
  12. What area do you live in? A great place to catch striper from the shore is Kent Narrows at night. There is a parking on the North side of the Kent Narrows bridge. On the west side of the bridge is probably the easiest to fish, but it's often crowded. A GREAT place to throw a fly rod. I used to use a small grass shrimp imitation, and you caught on virtually every cast on a summer night. Or if using a spinning rod, throw a pearl or albino 3", 5" or 7" FinS or Bass Assassin on a light, 1/4-1/2 ounce jig, depending on the speed of the current. Cast diagonally uptide, and reel just fast enough to keep tension on the line, and you will get bit pretty quickly and often. Don't let it drag bottom or you will lose it. I usually find casting up between the pilings to be most effective, although sometimes the fish hang just outside the light line. Cast into the light, and as soon as it hits the shadow, BAM! On the east side of the bridge are restaurants, and docks. Sometimes this side is best when it's crowded. In the summer, there are a lot of small 12-20" fish in there, but in June, and September - November, you might lay into a monster. Very often, because you are fishing for smaller fish, a 20# fish will grab your lure and torpedo for the pilings and break you off before you know what happened. Quite the adrenaline rush! And every once in a while, you will see a bigger fish landed there, 30-40" long. It's been a long time since I fished there, but I have some pretty good memories of fishing there. Great fishing, at times, especially for a young one. He will never forget it, if you are there on a good night. Best wishes. -TH
  13. What area do you live in? A great place to catch striper from the shore is Kent Narrows at night. There is a parking on the North side of the Kent Narrows bridge. On the west side of the bridge is probably the easiest to fish, but it's often crowded. A GREAT place to throw a fly rod. I used to use a small grass shrimp imitation, and you caught on virtually every cast on a summer night. Or if using a spinning rod, throw a pearl or albino 3", 5" or 7" FinS or Bass Assassin on a light, 1/4-1/2 ounce jig, depending on the speed of the current. Cast diagonally uptide, and reel just fast enough to keep tension on the line, and you will get bit pretty quickly and often. Don't let it drag bottom or you will lose it. I usually find casting up between the pilings to be most effective, although sometimes the fish hang just outside the light line. Cast into the light, and as soon as it hits the shadow, BAM! On the east side of the bridge are restaurants, and docks. Sometimes this side is best when it's crowded. In the summer, there are a lot of small 12-20" fish in there, but in June, and September - November, you might lay into a monster. Very often, because you are fishing for smaller fish, a 20# fish will grab your lure and torpedo for the pilings and break you off before you know what happened. Quite the adrenaline rush! And every once in a while, you will see a bigger fish landed there, 30-40" long. It's been a long time since I fished there, but I have some pretty good memories of fishing there. Great fishing, at times, especially for a young one. He will never forget it, if you are there on a good night. Best wishes. -TH
  14. But a large area is closed off due to construction. No fishing the inside or the bridge pilings on the West side. East side, I see guys fishing.
  15. A friend of mine bought two to try... They blew up, from normal use, not even from big fish. Not a big surprise, but a bit disappointing. I don't know what the other thread says, but this is a single experience, since you asked. -TH