gellfex

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About gellfex

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    Jersey city, NJ
  1. Are the stick on rulers available anywhere? I have that $13 telescoping blue Frabill one, but it's cracking from falling off the boat while on wheels. I'll take a crack at a DIY. I have an idea for a 28" board with a pullout/retracting nonmetallic tape. EDIT: I see they're on Amazon, but $8-12 seems pricey for a sticker!
  2. I have always heard this said but never heard of an actual case. Where I live many of the rowhouses are 100-150 years old, and are filled with all sorts of horrifying DIY plumbing and electric work. Once on a sale tour I saw zip cord embedded in the plaster running from the wall sconce to a DIY ceiling light! So if these houses were basically uninsurable without gutting, no one would be able to buy them. But in the case of this handyman, they're claiming they do NOT do that kind of work, only work that does not require a permit. So there's a huge area of repair work, especially after the revision, that falls in that category. I've always understood the law to make a big distinction between an owner doing DIY in his own single family, and anything else involving residents other than the owner and his immediate family, like rentals. But I could be wrong. I'm pretty sure it's illegal for a SFR owner to file the permit as he's allowed, but hire someone unlicensed to actually do the work. I once found this tape wrapped 'splice' above a drop ceiling. Simply horrifying in every way, yet it lasted for decades without burning the place down.
  3. Yeah, that has my vote. I once rescued a big Red Eared Slider from a beach in the Hamptons. There was a pond near there that drains to the beach periodically, it must have gotten caught when the dam blew. Also, snappers don't really have the ability to float the way most water turtles do. That why they have such long necks, to sit on the bottom of shallow spots and reach up for a breath. I used to see a lot of terrapins in the Peconics, they are salt dwellers. One fall years ago when my kids were small we rescued a newly hatched snapper that was floating in a lake above a well known bass hole. He didn't have long! Apparently it was some kind of gastric malfunction that made him float. We kept him till the next summer, dumbest pet we've ever had, and we've had lots of reptiles. Most fun was dropping crickets in when we had some for the bearded dragon, he'd go nuts!
  4. See, I've been told over the years it's definitely a 'permit' item. I even had an inspector come around when I left one in sight in the driveway. So this change is hard to parse. I tend to doubt it's covered there, changing a gas heater usually involves moving pipes since heaters are rarely identical after 10 years or so. I've never been able to figure out why Eastern plumbers ALWAYS hardpipe gas house and water heating equipment, when that would be code violation in the earthquaky West, and you need flex on the feeds too. The 'handyman licence' is nothing more than revenue, there's no certification that they actually know anything. Years ago I had a general contractors license back when the cities regulated it, and you could have a bond for just $100k. It was just for pulling my own permits in my rentals.
  5. Umm, how is it immaterial if the overwhelming majority of the units in question are not co-ops or condos? That classification makes ALL the difference in the law!
  6. Jeez man, what words in your mouth? This is what you said, not anything about IF it's a condo or co-op. For obvious reasons, most are not, and do not decontrol. Yup. And the housing shortage it's supposed to solve is mostly caused by good old free market Americans telling other people what they can and can't develop on their property. The density of the coastal cities would be higher and housing cheaper if the zoning restricting density were eliminated. NIMBY rules however.
  7. I was recently startled by a local 'handyman' advertising plumbing and electrical work. I contacted him to discuss it, and he said he is legally allowed to do anything that does not require a permit. Is this true? My original knowledge of this stuff may be outdated, but I thought while it was OK to DIY a lot of stuff in a single family, but it wasn't OK to do it for pay unlicensed or for a landlord like me to DIY. I remember being told that even though it didn't require a permit anything that broke the trap seal required a licensed plumber, and changing electric fixtures and devices you needed to hire a licensed electrician. There's also an unlicensed guy clearing drains including 4" cast iron mains. I found this doc about what's ordinary maintenance vs permitted work, but it says nothing about who can do such maintenance.https://www.state.nj.us/dca/divisions/codes/alerts/pdfs/OM_MW_03052018.pdf Anybody got intel on this?
  8. Yes, you are wrong. You made your statement about rentals, not legacy tenants of co-op or condo conversions. There is no vacancy decontrol of a regular rental like there is in SF for example. And here in JC, even a condo cannot be decontrolled if a single entity owns more than 4 on that single property. Yes, it's nucking futz to tell one group of businesses that they're responsible for social welfare. If we as a society wish to subsidize housing, there's Section 8 where every taxpayer contributes rather than declaring rental property owners take it in the rear. It's like saying doctors must see the indigent for free instead of getting Medicaid payments. It would surprise no one if there was then a shortage of doctors. Swedish economist and chair of the Nobel committee Assar Lindbeck once wrote, “In many cases rent control appears to be the most efficient technique presently known to destroy a city—except for bombing.”
  9. Sorry Joel, but none of that is true. There has never been simple vacancy decontrol of stabilized apartments, and they've even gotten rid of the rent trip wire decontrol. There was a time that if they renovated and used that to raise the rent legally past a certain level it would decontrol, but no more. https://rentguidelinesboard.cityofnewyork.us/resources/faqs/rent-stabilization/
  10. The fact they looked toe nailed instead of perpendicular to the joist could not have helped. There was just a little bit of wood that needed to pull out. Perhaps the builder thought it was too hard to swing a hammer in the 15" gap and didn't have the proper nail gun.
  11. Wow, just wow. What do you suppose the odds are of that sunroof never closing again?
  12. Only if you pay sticker price! Had my wife and not decided we weren't the people who were going to raise our kids in a rent stabilized 700ft 2br in Morningside Heights, we would still be paying less than $2000 20 years later.
  13. This may shock you, but NYC still has more than a million rent controlled/stabilized units. And "Upper Manhattan" used be known mostly as Harlem, not a trendy hood until pretty recently. The median family income there is under $50k. Just sayin, not everyone in Manhattan lives in a fancy doorman building.
  14. Did you lube up the O-rings with plumbers dielectric grease? Seat the cartridges properly? Other than that, it seems puzzling. Most of my sinks corrode out before the cartridge goes. In one of my baths the brass is showing through the nickel plating on the spout! Oddly, the cheap big box makes with 'Lifetime Warranties" are easier to get it honored than some big boys American Standard. Those M-Fs asked me for the original receipt form 10 years ago! Price Pfister has been great about free parts service for my 20 year old kitchen faucet.