Silver Stoat

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    Jon A

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  1. They're fickle animals. I've fly fished for them, but my son has been doing pretty well the last couple days on corn. Here's a snippet of his first captures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o_JuBStJCI We've been sight fishing for them, but on the day of the film the wind was up and we couldn't see down into the water. My experience blind casting for these fish is usually to blank, but both these fish took the corn fished blind under a small float. He used 4x tippet, which is pretty light for this size of fish. Maybe that helped. We also chummed in a few handfuls of corn.
  2. Thanks everyone for kind words. It was a banner day for us both, for sure. When we got back to the cabin after the float, around lunchtime, the snow was coming on heavy. My lad insisted we walk back to the river for a few afternoon hours (the last still in the video of him casting into the snow.) Scoobydoo - Funny thing happened at your snowball spot the day before our float. My son and I were walking the long walk around from the lower river when we noticed an SUV behaving strangely. A woman got out half way down the track and started to walk slowly behind us holding a camera. Hand-made signs had been put at increments of every 6th tree or so along the walk - none made sense to us. When we got to the parking lot two men were standing under a tree as if in ambush. I didn't like the look of any of it and we got to our car and started to tackle down quick smart. The woman was now crouching behind a tree. All very odd. And then a young couple emerged along the track, he got down on one knee, and the rest (as they say) is history! We made our congratulations on the drive out. The end to a good day. I was using a GoPro 7 for the first time and edited using Adobe Premiere Pro, again for the first time (the leap from Final Cut was pretty steep.) I don't know why the camera was set to 4:3 but it was too late by the time I noticed!
  3. I guess this falls squarely in the "proud dad" section, but seeing my youngest (12) get his first chrome on the Salmon River last week was inspiration to me. Please forgive the share. (And PS, I didn't manage a single fish to the net - all fish hooked were too hot to handle - such was the perfection of this trip.)
  4. If only Lefty had called them Vertical Wings, he'd have been so much cooler... Same as it ever was. Caveat emptor.
  5. It all depends what the fish are feeding on. Clousers or Decievers are great all-round flies. Many others are so similar to these two. I like a September Night, which in profile, size, color and every other respect is a sort of deceiver-style fly. I doubt the fish can tell them apart. In spring in my local salt marshes I wouldn't be without some sort of buoyant shrimp pattern, either tied with foam or deer hair to ride high like a dry fly. On flats in summer I like to have some crab imitations so the fish can ignore them :-)
  6. ....About once a week, Mike! The UK will always be home. I've been in CT for 14 years now, but still feel like a guest here, and that's not all bad. I live a stone's throw from stripers and we have a small stream at the back of the house which is worth the occasional cast. Two excellent trout rivers are a one hour drive away. I'm glad I learned fishing in Scotland though (and to rough shoot, which I did on various farms in the Kinross basin.) I was one lucky kid. Summers were spent worming or spinning on Edinburgh's River Almond. Before long I graduated to fly fishing Loch Leven (when it was still really good) and the Highlands for numerous wild brown trout. That's where I learned about loch style fishing, which to me is the best it gets. Drifting the peaty Assynt lochs on a windy evening, a team of 2 or 3 flies dancing across the surface for uninhibited wild browns... There's just nothing better. I swear a half pound Highland brown fights like a fish 3 or 4 times its weight. We also fished local estuaries for plentiful sea-tout in those days. They're long gone I think, which is very sad. The flies where traditional ones that were handed on by various fathers. All the Butchers, Solider Palmer, Kate McClaren, Loch Ordie, Bibio, Alder, Invicta, Alexandra, Burleigh Bob, Wickhams Fancy, Teal, Blue & Sliver, Grouse (or Mallard) & Claret, Black Pennell, Zulu, Dunkeld (what a fly!), Blae & Black - it feels like these names are a true part of my childhood, taking on more meaning than I ever knew back then. If there's a better looking fly than the Greenwell's Glory, I never met her. You've reminded me of the exact experience I had in the Edinburgh tackle stores. I remember going into John Dicksons on Fredrick Street as a 15 year old. What a place it was. A real hunting and fishing shop. Full of old men and that old Barbor smell. The old gents that worked there didn't much case for us kids with our loose change! Reluctantly the trays would come out from behind the counter and endless fly selections would light up our eyes. The store stopped selling fishing gear and now just has fancy clothes, probably killed by internet sales. I do miss the Daily Telegraph, the London Times, real sausages and of course a decent pint! Jonny
  7. Nail on head. The Greewells Spider - tied nice and long - is about my favorite fly for Highland brownies, especially in a nice wave. On the rivers I like a Black Spider, and Alder or any of the Partridge & yellow/orange designs. The Greenwell's Glory is as fishy a fly as ever existed. Love the others you've mentioned Mike. Takes me right back to the rivers of my youth around Edinburgh, and parts north.
  8. There are places around that have sales on demo boats this time of year. For your price point you may be able to try a pre-2019 Outback for a similar price, or at least look at some comparisons.
  9. Thanks to those that wrote letters. The deadline has now passed.
  10. If you love fishing for striped bass and want to be sure ASMFC takes the steps needed to rebuild the stock please take the time to participate in the process. Please consider writing a letter. Here's mine FWIW. More info here: https://saltwaterguidesassociation.com/asga-comments-on-addendum-vi-to-amendment-6-striped-bass-management/ Public comments will be accepted until 5 PM (EST) on October 7, 2019 and should be sent to comments@asmfc.org Subject line: Striped Bass Draft Addendum VI. Dear Commissioners and Staff, Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Draft Addendum VI to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Striped Bass. I am a recreational angler living in Connecticut, and have been fishing catch and release for striped bass throughout New England for the last decade. The paucity of the current regulations overseen by the Commission has allowed striped bass populations to plummet to dangerous levels. Striped Bass continue to be over harvested and it is critical that you now institute strong conservation policies to prevent further loss. Amendment 6 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for striped bass mandates rebuilding stocks with a ten-year time frame. Given that your proposed amendment won’t rebuild striper stocks until 2033, I fully support the American Saltwater Guides Association position and echo their concerns as to the glaring lack of accountability at the ASMFC. The perilous state of the striped bass fishery should require an immediate shift to a more rigid framework like that governing Federal fishery management councils. My preference would be for immediate mandatory catch and release only; barb-less single hook artificial lures; no bait fishing; and a reduced open season for the striped bass. While we await more decisive action, I strongly urge the Commission to adopt the following options to end over-fishing and rebuild striper stocks: - Option 2: Equal percent reduction across all sectors - Sub-Option 2A-1: 1 fish limit with a minimum size of 35” for the Coast Ocean Recreational Fishery - Sub-Option 2-B-1: 1 fish limit with a minimum size of 18” for the Chesapeake Bay - Option B: Mandatory circle hooks for the whole fishery The Draft Amendment states that the Atlantic striped bass is…“the most iconic finfish on the Atlantic coast and has supported valuable fisheries for centuries.” We trust that you will now take these minimum steps to safeguard even the short term future of this invaluable resource. Sincerely, Jon Atherton
  11. We all need to take a few minutes and write a bloody letter.
  12. You would indeed.
  13. I saw a guy catching with them recently. They look deadly.
  14. Mike, The ASMFC call for comment is lost among many regular posts. Why isn't it pinned to the top of all the forums? Please can this happen? As you know, the opportunity to comment and change the regs is a big deal. It should be pinned up here. The reality is that it takes way more than 5 minutes to send replies. The Amendment Report is lengthy and turgid - it's almost impossible to get a clear idea of the problem and the proposals (I'm guessing this is par for the coarse with this body.) Usually it's possible to copy/paste a stock letter, but strangely even the excellent ASGA response is given as an image rather than plain text, so it's not easy to recycle it. That's why a few of us are sharing what we have already written, so at least folks can copy, paste, or easily amend. Jon
  15. Public comments will be accepted until 5 PM (EST) on October 7, 2019 and should be sent to comments@asmfc.org Subject line: Striped Bass Draft Addendum VI. Dear Commissioners and Staff, Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Draft Addendum VI to Amendment 6 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Striped Bass. I am a recreational angler living in Connecticut, and have been fishing catch and release for striped bass throughout New England for the last decade. The paucity of the current regulations overseen by the Commission has allowed striped bass populations to plummet to dangerous levels. Striped Bass continue to be over harvested and it is critical that you now institute strong conservation policies to prevent further loss. Amendment 6 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for striped bass mandates rebuilding stocks with a ten-year time frame. Given that your proposed amendment won’t rebuild striper stocks until 2033, I fully support the American Saltwater Guides Association position and echo their concerns as to the glaring lack of accountability at the ASMFC. The perilous state of the striped bass fishery should require an immediate shift to a more rigid framework like that governing Federal fishery management councils. My preference would be for immediate mandatory catch and release only; barb-less single hook artificial lures; no bait fishing; and a reduced open season for the striped bass. While we await more decisive action, I strongly urge the Commission to adopt the following options to end over-fishing and rebuild striper stocks: - Option 2: Equal percent reduction across all sectors - Sub-Option 2A-1: 1 fish limit with a minimum size of 35” for the Coast Ocean Recreational Fishery - Sub-Option 2-B-1: 1 fish limit with a minimum size of 18” for the Chesapeake Bay - Option B: Mandatory circle hooks for the whole fishery The Draft Amendment states that the Atlantic striped bass is…“the most iconic finfish on the Atlantic coast and has supported valuable fisheries for centuries.” We trust that you will now take these minimum steps to safeguard even the short term future of this invaluable resource. Sincerely, Jon Atherton