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striper migration - Page 3

post #31 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by buz23 View Post

I believe that stripers have to get out of the cold winter salt water because their system will not handle temperatures below 32 degrees - and salt water up north gets below this. So if they do stay up north, they either have to go to freshwater (minimum temp, 32) or find some source of hotter water (power plant outflow, springs, etc.). I believe there is a migration to warmer southern waters in the fall - down off Virginia and North Carolina. Look at the whuppinn they put on them out of Virginia Beach and Oregon Inlet - I don't think there is much of a summer fishery down there.

I must have dreamed up the part about stripers freezing in seawater. Can't back it up - thought I had read it in Karras's book or somewhere. They definitely prefer somewhat warmer temperatures, however.
post #32 of 76

alot of good stuff in here...would like to learn some more because theyre not coming near cape may in fall lately

post #33 of 76
I believe (and I have ready tagging studies to back it up) that stripers do migrate. They are not all just nearby and happen to magically show up when the temperatures get warm. There are two major breeding stocks, the Hudson stock and Chesapeake stock. All breeding fish return to their spawning ground every spring to spawn from what I understand. Also, to explain why the fish seem to magically show up all over around the same time you have to believe (I have read this somewhere) that the Hudson and Chesapeake bass take different migration routes. From what I have read, the Chesapeake fish make their northerly migration around Montauk, while the Hudson fish come up the east river and follow the river herring along the CT shoreline. I have also read the the Hudson fish don't migrate as far north as the Chesapeake fish. I have also read that regardless of where the fish were spawned, all the cows (I am talking 40"+ fish) winter over down south. Not all stripers migrate, and not all stripers migrate north. Some Hudson fish migrate south to Jersey, and some don't migrate at all. I have also read that LIS is actually considered part of the Hudson estuary, and as a result small bass are caught in LIS that are mistaken for locally bred fish, when in fact they are Hudson River fish. The smaller bass will move from upstream and spend the summer not straying too far from the river. Then there are the winter over contingents. These fish are all Hudson River stock fish that for whatever reason, spend the winter somewhere else. They don't spawn where they winter over if they are of spawning size, they return to the Hudson. While it is nice wishful thinking that bass are spawining locally, I have talked to several biologists that say that the rivers and streams in CT simply don't have the environment to support successful spawning.

As far as the wintertime goes, I believe that salinity and the size of the fish make a difference. If I remember correctly, stripers have trouble breathing in fresh water at cold temperatures, and it depends on the size as well. Tidal rivers that have winter over populations need a salt water wedge and deep holes for the fish to hold in. When the water temps are very low, the fish will stay deep in the salt water and not move much. The halocline is a glass ceiling above which the bass don't move. "Over'Winter Striper Secrets" by Al Anderson has a good discussion on migration, winter habits, and results of tagging studies. I read the book a number of years ago so I can't guarantee that I'm getting all the details 100% correct.
post #34 of 76
Wow lots of interesting info here
post #35 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob_in_CT View Post

All breeding fish return to their spawning ground every spring to spawn from what I understand.

small bass are caught in LIS that are mistaken for locally bred fish, when in fact they are Hudson River fish. These fish are all Hudson River stock fish that for whatever reason, spend the winter somewhere else.

I have talked to several biologists that say that the rivers and streams in CT simply don't have the environment to support successful spawning.

.

The first statement is incorrect, not all stripers spawn every year, in fact some scientists estimate that as few as 50% of the population spawns in any given year.

The other two statements are correct.
post #36 of 76
I've caught, and seen caught waaaaaaay too many spawning age fish in LIS and its rivers during the Hudson spawning season to not agree 100% with Makomike. Hell, the peak of that spawn happens during our best spring fishing when 50-fish days, most of them spawning age, are common in some of the bigger rivers. Now, those fish either left the hudson to meet midway the herring schools entering the sound from 100 miles to the east, or they were already here, or they'd been on the herring all winter offshore. Since most have a pretty dark, muddy-olive coloration until mid-late May, my money's on here-already.
post #37 of 76
If stripers only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake, how do you explain the spawn that occurs in Columbia, SC?
post #38 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBHarvey View Post

I've caught, and seen caught waaaaaaay too many spawning age fish in LIS and its rivers during the Hudson spawning season to agree 100% with Makomike. Hell, the peak of that spawn happens during our best spring fishing when 50-fish days, most of them spawning age, are common in some of the bigger rivers. Now, those fish either left the hudson to meet midway the herring schools entering the sound from 100 miles to the east, or they were already here, or they'd been on the herring all winter offshore. Since most have a pretty dark, muddy-olive coloration until mid-late May, my money's on here-already.

Sounds like you do agree with what I said?
post #39 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwater View Post

If stripers only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake, how do you explain the spawn that occurs in Columbia, SC?

Lazy southerners.
post #40 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by MakoMike View Post

Sounds like you do agree with what I said?

I do -100%- forgot the word "not".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwater View Post

If stripers only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake, how do you explain the spawn that occurs in Columbia, SC?

or the one in the St. Lawrence up in Canada......
post #41 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwater View Post

If stripers only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake, how do you explain the spawn that occurs in Columbia, SC?

Stripers spawn in many rivers on the east coast, the difference is that those that spawn in rivers other than the Hudson, Delaware and the rivers leading into Chesapeake bay are NOT MIGRATORY
post #42 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwater View Post

If stripers only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake, how do you explain the spawn that occurs in Columbia, SC?

They don't only spawn in the Hudson and Chesapeake but those two along with the Delaware are the 3 main spawning areas.
post #43 of 76
Stripers that spawn in rivers that encounter the Labrador Current are less prone to be migratory. Those south of Long Island migrate to find cooler water in the summer. We don't have stripers in the Atlantic Bight in the summer. Come December, they start popping up in our estuaries again. I assure you- if they were here, we'd have found them.
post #44 of 76
Bob in CT. 40 inch fish are still bring caught in CT right now. So I don't necessarily believe all the big fish winter over down south. Maybe the majority but definitely not all of them. Didn't someone get a 46 or 47 inch fish last December in that famous herring spot? The bigger fish are much harder to target over the winter since they don't school up like the little ones do. But I've seen plenty of large fish taken in ct before the "migration" happens.
post #45 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetwater View Post

Stripers that spawn in rivers that encounter the Labrador Current are less prone to be migratory. Those south of Long Island migrate to find cooler water in the summer.

Then how do you explain the fact that stripers spawn in many rivers fro the Albermarle/Roanoke rivers in NC down to the St John's river in FL and NONE of them migrate?
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