StripersOnline › SurfTalk › Regional Forums › New Jersey Fishing › nj bucktail fluke fishing
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

nj bucktail fluke fishing

post #1 of 120
Thread Starter 
I have fished for fluke for many years and have always used the basic hook and sinker rig. I am looking to try bucktailing this year and have no idea how to do it (which is the main reason I joined stripers online). I have seen many guys pulling in doormats with bucktails and would like to get in on the action this year. It might be a little early to ask fluke questions but I want to be ready for the season.
hooked.gif
I like to fish in the Manasquan river or along the coast. So......
What is the best rod to use?
What is the best reel to use?
Gulp! Or live bait?
What size bucktail?
What color bucktail?
Braid or mono?
Any tips?

I know it is a lot is questions but I would love to know how to do this.
help.gif
post #2 of 120

Pick up John Skinner's book and read it twice. He also has a very good video up on that video sharing site that shows underwater fluke action on a bucktail.

post #3 of 120
Thread Starter 
I saw the video but haven't read the book..... I'll try to pick it up somewhere
post #4 of 120
I've come to my own conclusion that when fluke are on the feed they will eat anything within sight. Match the hatch and use whatever gear is necessary to fish your rig or conditions properly
post #5 of 120
What is the best rod to use?
depends on the size of the jig your using. i have 2 main boat set ups though. a 6'6" american tackle custom. jigging blank..will jig from an ounce all the way up as high as you would wanna go for fluke. also have a 7' daiwa black widow rod that is a cheap rod, but really awesome. moderate action, doesn't like over 4 oz, although i have jigged 6 with it. kayak, i use the 6'6" or have some light ugly stick spinning rods, or my favorite... a 4'6" tica kayak rod. softest tip ever, but enough back bone to lift a house..and weighs next to nothing. surf? i use spinning, 9' star if im throwing over 2 oz, or my 7' star if throwing lighter and fish are in closer


What is the best reel to use?
depends on rod, etc. i have an avet sx on my 6'6", a daiwa millionare on the daiwa 7', and abu's on almost everything else. spinning i have a vs150 on the 9' and a penn battle on the 7'


Gulp! Or live bait?
i fish gulp 90% of the time. but fresh cut strip bait and live spot are killers too...

What size bucktail?
ill fish anything from 1/4 oz up to 10+ oz. depends on conditions, depth, current, boat/shore/kayak, etc etc...

What color bucktail?
i like green/chartreuse over white..but will be putting lots of orange to use this year. all white is good to. pink over white, etc etc...

Braid or mono?
braid, 15 lb on my light, shallow water set ups, 20-30 on everything else.

Any tips?
go as light as possible on the jig. just enough to contact bottom when you want to. you don't want to drag the bucktail on the bottom, you want to float/bounce right above it. a teaser rig, or a tap dancer rig is the way to go when bucktailing fluke with gulp in my opinion


hope that kinda helps...just barely touched the tip of the ice berg that is fluking. probably one of my favorite fisheries...jigging fluke.
post #6 of 120
Bucktailing from the shore/rocks is a lot different than bucktailing from a boat. IMO they are 2 totally different ball games.

So the question is are you flukin from shore or boat?

John
post #7 of 120
If your fishing in the river, light tackle is always fun. But if your going to target some of the bigger fish you might want a little more back bone. Just not so much that it takes the fun out of it. I usually use anything from 1/4 oz. to 1&1/2 oz bucktails for the rivers. This is depending on conditions of course. You should be using just enough to get it down to the bottom. Get some different colors because fluke can be picky some times. They might only be hitting lures in one color one day and won't hit them the next. Their weird like that sometimes. Gulp mullets are always a good place to start. Again, mix up the colors. I would use something like 15 lb braid and maybe a 1&1/2 foot of leader. You can also tie a dropper loop in the leader and attach a hook to that with some gulp or spearing or killies. Get creative!

I'm excited for the season as well and I hope this helps. Tight lines!
post #8 of 120
Oops double post
post #9 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSpaniard View Post

Bucktailing from the shore/rocks is a lot different than bucktailing from a boat. IMO they are 2 totally different ball games.

So the question is are you flukin from shore or boat?

John

Boat most of the time in 5 - 20 ft of water. Occasionally I fish in around 30 - 60 ft of water but not very often.
post #10 of 120
Ok, Boat fishing a bucktail is a very verticle presentation. The more you can keep your bucktail straight up and down the better. Now that doesn't mean throw on a bucktail that is heavy enough to stay straight down but you can do that. The problem with heavier bucktails is you loose action. So lets say you need a 3oz to stay straight up/down, you can drop down to a 2oz and cast up your drift. You might get 3-6 bounces before your line heads out the back of the boat bringing your bucktail away from the bottom. Or you could just stay with the 3oz, keep it a couple feet off the bottom and just twitch your rod tip repeatedly. While the 3oz way is less of a hassle because you don't have to reel in and recast but I find that using the smaller bucktail and casting up drift will get you more action. I believe this is the case because what your doing is keeping that bucktail in almost the same place jigging it up off the bottom a few times while the boat drifts towards where the bucktail is at. This let's the fluke see it more and have to chase less. Don't be afraid to really bring your bucktail 5-7 feet off the bottom doing this letting it fall on it's own weight back to the bottom. If your trying this as you bring your rod tip up high follow your line back down with the bucktail so the line is just tight because 90% of the bites are going to be on the drop as it gets close to the bottom. In many cases the bite is very very soft and sometimes you won't even feel it. When you go to lift off the bottom for the next jig you'll set the hook. This is why it's important to have a nice piece of meat or gulp works too. When that flouke takes in a bucktail if you don't have some flavgor on the hook they spit it fast which means you have to be fast. If there's a nice strip of sea robin on there they will chew it to pieces giving you more time to set the hook.

From the boat you could also drift along shallower water just dragging your bucktail if you know there is little to snag on. In that case you should have a teaser 100% of the time as 95% of the fish are going to hit the teaser. When you drag your offering the line is out on say a 45 degree angle with the bucktail dragging in the sand. That bucktail is actually hard for a fluke to see because it's even with it head while it eyes are looking up. Fluke are really made to come off the bottom and eat prey above them. That's why the teaser really shines. Put that teaser about 18-24 inches up the leader and if your dragging it's now really about 12 inches off the bottom, a perfect zone for fluke. IMO it is not worth dragging a bucktail like this across the bottom. Just take the bucktail off and throw on a round style weight. I only mentioned this style because many guys think this is how to fish a bucktail but I would disagree and say it's a waste. If you want to drag bottom for fluke and want that extra hook don't use a bucktail, just use 2 teasers and a weight.....

You can do this kind of fishing with almost any gear but some features will help you and make it easier on your arms. You def want braided line. You can use spinning or casting reels. For deep water a rod with a good backbone and faster soft tip will help you work the bucktail. For shallow water the same rod but scaled down a bit will work.

John
post #11 of 120

whatever you end up doing, dont forget the teaser!  

post #12 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSpaniard View Post

Ok, Boat fishing a bucktail is a very verticle presentation. The more you can keep your bucktail straight up and down the better. Now that doesn't mean throw on a bucktail that is heavy enough to stay straight down but you can do that. The problem with heavier bucktails is you loose action. So lets say you need a 3oz to stay straight up/down, you can drop down to a 2oz and cast up your drift. You might get 3-6 bounces before your line heads out the back of the boat bringing your bucktail away from the bottom. Or you could just stay with the 3oz, keep it a couple feet off the bottom and just twitch your rod tip repeatedly. While the 3oz way is less of a hassle because you don't have to reel in and recast but I find that using the smaller bucktail and casting up drift will get you more action. I believe this is the case because what your doing is keeping that bucktail in almost the same place jigging it up off the bottom a few times while the boat drifts towards where the bucktail is at. This let's the fluke see it more and have to chase less. Don't be afraid to really bring your bucktail 5-7 feet off the bottom doing this letting it fall on it's own weight back to the bottom. If your trying this as you bring your rod tip up high follow your line back down with the bucktail so the line is just tight because 90% of the bites are going to be on the drop as it gets close to the bottom. In many cases the bite is very very soft and sometimes you won't even feel it. When you go to lift off the bottom for the next jig you'll set the hook. This is why it's important to have a nice piece of meat or gulp works too. When that flouke takes in a bucktail if you don't have some flavgor on the hook they spit it fast which means you have to be fast. If there's a nice strip of sea robin on there they will chew it to pieces giving you more time to set the hook.

From the boat you could also drift along shallower water just dragging your bucktail if you know there is little to snag on. In that case you should have a teaser 100% of the time as 95% of the fish are going to hit the teaser. When you drag your offering the line is out on say a 45 degree angle with the bucktail dragging in the sand. That bucktail is actually hard for a fluke to see because it's even with it head while it eyes are looking up. Fluke are really made to come off the bottom and eat prey above them. That's why the teaser really shines. Put that teaser about 18-24 inches up the leader and if your dragging it's now really about 12 inches off the bottom, a perfect zone for fluke. IMO it is not worth dragging a bucktail like this across the bottom. Just take the bucktail off and throw on a round style weight. I only mentioned this style because many guys think this is how to fish a bucktail but I would disagree and say it's a waste. If you want to drag bottom for fluke and want that extra hook don't use a bucktail, just use 2 teasers and a weight.....

You can do this kind of fishing with almost any gear but some features will help you and make it easier on your arms. You def want braided line. You can use spinning or casting reels. For deep water a rod with a good backbone and faster soft tip will help you work the bucktail. For shallow water the same rod but scaled down a bit will work.

John

Lot of good info in there....thx
post #13 of 120
Definately have a teaser and tip it with something.

Some guys like banana head jigs and some spro head type. I prefer spro type when bucktailing straight up and down.
post #14 of 120
Last year I got on the large teaser bandwagon. I can tell you there's big fluke driving that wagon.
post #15 of 120
All great advice. I bucktail for fluke off the shore/jettys a lot in the summer. I always have a simple teaser on too.

In the past, when I'd fish a 3/4 btail, most of my fish ate the teaser. When I started to fish a 1/2 oz. btail I'd still get fish on the teaser, but I had a lot more hookups on the btail. I think it was b/c the lighter btail was swimming nicely right off the bottom more often, instead of just dragging or bouncing.

A lot of older guys I watch that btail for bass when the surf is light throw 1/2 oz btails. 3/4 oz. feels pretty heavy to me if there is little or no swell in the water. And I've seen posts where guys are throwing 2 oz btails off the beach, that would feel so heavy to me, unless the surf and wind were raging.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: New Jersey Fishing
StripersOnline › SurfTalk › Regional Forums › New Jersey Fishing › nj bucktail fluke fishing