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How far do Stripers swim up the Hudson during Fall migration.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I know it's pretty much over, but I saw a similar thread in the Chesapeake forum and got curious.
I spend the fall fishing the south shore, but I live in the Bronx and fish the Hudson so I'm curious. Do they make probe up to GW or TZ. I know the battery park crowd gets some goods cracks during fall run.
post #2 of 15

there is some mark recapture data on this site:

 

http://www.hudsonriver.org/sb/
 

post #3 of 15
killapete3 - Thousands of striped bass of all sizes winter over in the salty section of the Hudson River below the Bear Mtn. Bridge. If you look at the map Littorally supplied on the link you can pick out Croton Point on the east side of the river. The four red dot recovery markers just to the north and near the west side is where there is a deep glacial trench that is as deep as 285 feet in some places.

In cold winters thousands, even hundreds of thousands of striped bass spend the coldest weeks of the winter deep in the Trench in sort of a "statis mode" conserving their strength and shoaled up with other striped bass segragated in schools by their size. Last winter, the winter wasn't cold enough, so there was great fishing to be had along the Jersey and Brooklyn Beaches. Lots of sand eels in the wash and blitz's on Long Beach Island that rivaled the ledendary one of the past. Very few Striped bass needed to move up into the lower Hudson River for winter shelter. The Ocean Water Temperature last year did not go below 42 degrees. It truly was the "Winter that Wasn't".

Some of the larger striped bass migrate to the lower Hudson and stay in the lower tidal end all winter and then move up the river to spawn. Those fish in the Hudson will start moving up river in march or April when the first schools of River herring come into the river to spawn. Three year old striped bass (18 inches or so) will move out into the ocean or thru Spiten Divel into the Wesstern End of LI Sound begining in April. Some of them will migrate up to the Southern beaches of Cape Cod and all points in between. Jamica Bay, Great South Bay, LI Sound, Rhode Island and Mass. Those that exit into Raritan Bay may stay along the Jersey Coast or travel along the southern beaches of LI and on up into Nantucket Sound. When the more mature fish 8+years spawn in May they will follow the schoolies who left in April. Some to New England, LI Sound and on down the Jersey Shore. They will be our local resident striped bass for the summer months.

There is a lot of good information on the DEC - Hudson River Fisheries Unit site on line. Look up the article "True Bass".

I like the Abrahms. Hell of a battle tank. When I was in the Marines they were using the M-48 with a 90 mm gun.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks RJ + Littorally,

good info .

 

Yeah the M1 my baby.  That was the upgraded version too, the M1A2 SEP and had some great capabilities for the urban envirorment. Moving forward with an infantry she was unbeatable. Served with 1st Marines for a time in Iraq.

Semper Fi

post #5 of 15

Great info RJ, thank you. 

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by killapete3 View Post

Thanks RJ + Littorally,
good info .

Yeah the M1 my baby.  That was the upgraded version too, the M1A2 SEP and had some great capabilities for the urban envirorment. Moving forward with an infantry she was unbeatable. Served with 1st Marines for a time in Iraq.
Semper Fi

Semper Fidelis, My friend. Thank you for your service. My old out fit was Mike Co, 3rd Bn, 5th Marine Regiment, First Marine Division. In Iraq and Afganhistan the Battalion's Call sign was "Darkhorse".

Merry Christmas.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

That's really funny. My company's call sign was Darkhorse,.  My Brigade, 2 Brigade "Blackjack" 1st Cavalry Division was assigned to 1st Marine during Fallujah, then my individual company was assigned to 2/22 Marineswhich I believe was a reserve rifle battalion.

 

Merry Xmas to you too and thans for yourservice as well.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by killapete3 View Post

That's really funny. My company's call sign was Darkhorse,.  My Brigade, 2 Brigade "Blackjack" 1st Cavalry Division was assigned to 1st Marine during Fallujah, then my individual company was assigned to 2/22 Marineswhich I believe was a reserve rifle battalion.

Merry Xmas to you too and thans for yourservice as well.

Your Brigade did some fantastic work in the 2nd Battle of Fallujah. That Combined Op kicked some serious Azz. You are right about the Marine Reserve Unit. All the Marine Corps Regular Infantry Regiments, First, Second and Third Marine Divisions are numbered between The 1st Marine and the 9th Marine Regiments. You were serving with the First Marine Division and the 22nd Marines were attach to it as well. From what I hear, those Reservists did some serious damage to the enemy as well.

Minor Note: When a Marine says he served in the 5th Marines, he is talking about the Regiment. not the Division.

Every Service has their own local dialect. You say hooUP and we say Hooragh! Thanks Again.

If you need some specifics on spots to fish in the Hudson River PM me. I'd be happy to point them out right down the the tide and time of day. I spent the better part of 60 years fishing that River.

Consider it a Christmas present. Be well!

Bob
post #9 of 15

I fish the Hudson, about 80 miles north of the City.  The last couple years I've keyed on fishing the fall for resident stripers and/or migratory bass going either way and have caught a bunch in the 18-30" range.  Not big numbers and challenging to target, but they are there.  As I understand it, there's a number of theories about striped bass in the Hudson outside of the spring spawning run:

 

 1. Juvenile bass that were spawned in the Hudson stay there year round up to age 3 before migrating back down to the salt

 2. There is a small resident population of bass that stay their whole lives in the Hudson, including large adults

 3. A indeterminate number of bass move in to the Hudson to winter over as alluded to by RJ

 

The wintering contingent of bass is interesting to me. Several rivers in Connecticut are known to hold huge numbers of wintering stripers that can be targetted and caught.  The Hudson river water by me (Kingston area) is fresh - the salinity line is anywhere from 20 to 40 miles south of here.  But I've heard reports from credible fishermen of bass up to 40" being caught Thanksgiving weekend north of here, and of guys in the know catching numbers of bass up to 20lbs at the Troy dam north of Albany end of October on bucktails.  Alot of this stuff for the fishermen up my neck of the woods is something of a mystery as very few people do it.  Very few guys fish the fall striper run (if it even exists) and most guys think it is mythical and you can only catch stripers in the northern Hudson in the spring - but there are fish there.  Of course the further south you go i.e. Tappanzee, Croton, Piermont area, the more bass there are in the late fall. 

 

RJ, I'd love to know what general area of the Hudson you fish.  Nice to see another Hudson guy on here.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoMets View Post

I fish the Hudson, about 80 miles north of the City.  The last couple years I've keyed on fishing the fall for resident stripers and/or migratory bass going either way and have caught a bunch in the 18-30" range.  Not big numbers and challenging to target, but they are there.  As I understand it, there's a number of theories about striped bass in the Hudson outside of the spring spawning run:

 1. Juvenile bass that were spawned in the Hudson stay there year round up to age 3 before migrating back down to the salt
 2. There is a small resident population of bass that stay their whole lives in the Hudson, including large adults
 3. A indeterminate number of bass move in to the Hudson to winter over as alluded to by RJ

The wintering contingent of bass is interesting to me. Several rivers in Connecticut are known to hold huge numbers of wintering stripers that can be targetted and caught.  The Hudson river water by me (Kingston area) is fresh - the salinity line is anywhere from 20 to 40 miles south of here.  But I've heard reports from credible fishermen of bass up to 40" being caught Thanksgiving weekend north of here, and of guys in the know catching numbers of bass up to 20lbs at the Troy dam north of Albany end of October on bucktails.  Alot of this stuff for the fishermen up my neck of the woods is something of a mystery as very few people do it.  Very few guys fish the fall striper run (if it even exists) and most guys think it is mythical and you can only catch stripers in the northern Hudson in the spring - but there are fish there.  Of course the further south you go i.e. Tappanzee, Croton, Piermont area, the more bass there are in the late fall. 

RJ, I'd love to know what general area of the Hudson you fish.  Nice to see another Hudson guy on here.
[/quote

From Ravena south to the Rip Van Winkle Drift. Mostly. There are a couple of interesting flats in that stretch. First light Fly water and Rattle Trap night water. Then the Malden to Saugerties section. I hit the Mouth of the Ro-Jan when ever I'm passing thru. And a spring spawning run wouldn't be complete with out launching at Ryder and fishing up and down the River.

In the fall I like to get out early on a dropping tide and look for shad, herring and striper YOY schools pushing south. I usually can pick a few stripers to 20 pounds off the edges of the schools. My longest drift doing that was from Coxsackie all the way to the Saugerties light. Perfect Day!mThe tide started moving south about 6 am and I spotted three or four patches of "shakey water" moving south on the east side and drifted with them and picked away until they moved away. Had a bite to eat in Catskill and picked up another batch and caught a 23 # SB. Near the Inbuff, I caught 6 small mouth bass to 3 pounds on Clousers. After that the chopped picked up and I rode south to see if I could find some bait moving in the lee of small points. The key to that kind of drifting is almost flat as glass conditions. The striped bass mostly feed on the bottom of the schools. Not a lot of Blitz busting water. Smalles are more aggressive on the small shad schools. It's been a couple of years since I did any drifting like that.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ View Post

Quote:
From Ravena south to the Rip Van Winkle Drift. Mostly. There are a couple of interesting flats in that stretch. First light Fly water and Rattle Trap night water. Then the Malden to Saugerties section. I hit the Mouth of the Ro-Jan when ever I'm passing thru. And a spring spawning run wouldn't be complete with out launching at Ryder and fishing up and down the River.
 
In the fall I like to get out early on a dropping tide and look for shad, herring and striper YOY schools pushing south. I usually can pick a few stripers to 20 pounds off the edges of the schools. My longest drift doing that was from Coxsackie all the way to the Saugerties light. Perfect Day! The tide started moving south about 6 am and I spotted three or four patches of "shakey water" moving south on the east side and drifted with them and picked away until they moved away. Had a bite to eat in Catskill and picked up another batch and caught a 23 # SB. Near the Inbuff, I caught 6 small mouth bass to 3 pounds on Clousers. After that the chopped picked up and I rode south to see if I could find some bait moving in the lee of small points. The key to that kind of drifting is almost flat as glass conditions. The striped bass mostly feed on the bottom of the schools. Not a lot of Blitz busting water. Smalles are more aggressive on the small shad schools. It's been a couple of years since I did any drifting like that.

Very cool, thanks for info RJ, and those are big bass for the fall in the Hudson!  When in the fall are you doing this kind of fishing?  Or is it more water temperature driven?  The last couple years I've started picking bass end of September and this year got my last on November 23rd - but the sweet spot seems to be mid to end of October.  This year was strange though with the warm/dry spring/summer and then Sandy...

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoMets View Post

Very cool, thanks for info RJ, and those are big bass for the fall in the Hudson!  When in the fall are you doing this kind of fishing?  Or is it more water temperature driven?  The last couple years I've started picking bass end of September and this year got my last on November 23rd - but the sweet spot seems to be mid to end of October.  This year was strange though with the warm/dry spring/summer and then Sandy...

It Depends on when the Young of the Year shad, herring and striped bass start moving. It could be caused by shorter days as we slide into winter or by water temperature. When I'm up there and the weather permits I'm out almost every fish able day. The first big fish caught near or north of Catskill begin in the last 10 days of April with normal weather. Cold april and it shifts to early May.

Striped Bass who are up there to spawn are notorious for stopping a bite when the River gets a cold shot of rain or snow. they quit feeding. It could be that they seek out the deeper holds and wait the cold weather out, or they just stop feeding and hang out on the bottom. The only thing they do whilst waiting for the Temp. to hit 58 Degrees is eat rivers herring and the occasional small shad. It is a lethargic sort of wait and feed pattern.

Find some flats and check it out at full low tide. If it has little guzzles cut into the mud from the sod bank that fills up earlier than the general tidal push up and on to the flat. fish the rising tide with small shad rubber or a silver spoon. Reel it back slowly. At night on the same flat, throw rattletraps and rip them back to the bank or to the boat. the Berkley rep in the Hudson Valley taught me that trick when I attended the Dutches County Sportsmen's Striped Bass seminar in a Fire House near Millbrook, NY. A different town. Either on 44 or 82. Usually in April.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoMets View Post

I fish the Hudson, about 80 miles north of the City.  The last couple years I've keyed on fishing the fall for resident stripers and/or migratory bass going either way and have caught a bunch in the 18-30" range.  Not big numbers and challenging to target, but they are there.  As I understand it, there's a number of theories about striped bass in the Hudson outside of the spring spawning run:

 1. Juvenile bass that were spawned in the Hudson stay there year round up to age 3 before migrating back down to the salt
 2. There is a small resident population of bass that stay their whole lives in the Hudson, including large adults
 3. A indeterminate number of bass move in to the Hudson to winter over as alluded to by RJ

The wintering contingent of bass is interesting to me. Several rivers in Connecticut are known to hold huge numbers of wintering stripers that can be targetted and caught.  The Hudson river water by me (Kingston area) is fresh - the salinity line is anywhere from 20 to 40 miles south of here.  But I've heard reports from credible fishermen of bass up to 40" being caught Thanksgiving weekend north of here, and of guys in the know catching numbers of bass up to 20lbs at the Troy dam north of Albany end of October on bucktails.  Alot of this stuff for the fishermen up my neck of the woods is something of a mystery as very few people do it.  Very few guys fish the fall striper run (if it even exists) and most guys think it is mythical and you can only catch stripers in the northern Hudson in the spring - but there are fish there.  Of course the further south you go i.e. Tappanzee, Croton, Piermont area, the more bass there are in the late fall. 

RJ, I'd love to know what general area of the Hudson you fish.  Nice to see another Hudson guy on here.
[/quote

From Ravena south to the Rip Van Winkle Drift. Mostly. There are a couple of interesting flats in that stretch. First light Fly water and Rattle Trap night water. Then the Malden to Saugerties section. I hit the Mouth of the Ro-Jan when ever I'm passing thru. And a spring spawning run wouldn't be complete with out launching at Ryder and fishing up and down the River.

In the fall I like to get out early on a dropping tide and look for shad, herring and striper YOY schools pushing south. I usually can pick a few stripers to 20 pounds off the edges of the schools. My longest drift doing that was from Coxsackie all the way to the Saugerties light. Perfect Day!mThe tide started moving south about 6 am and I spotted three or four patches of "shakey water" moving south on the east side and drifted with them and picked away until they moved away. Had a bite to eat in Catskill and picked up another batch and caught a 23 # SB. Near the Inbuff, I caught 6 small mouth bass to 3 pounds on Clousers. After that the chopped picked up and I rode south to see if I could find some bait moving in the lee of small points. The key to that kind of drifting is almost flat as glass conditions. The striped bass mostly feed on the bottom of the schools. Not a lot of Blitz busting water. Smalles are more aggressive on the small shad schools. It's been a couple of years since I did any drifting like that.
Coxsackie, and Catskill ,Hudson,Athens is my area
post #14 of 15
Seen them as far north as Albany
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by otlip View Post

Seen them as far north as Albany

Spring spawning season or the fall? otlip?
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