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winterizing house

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hello
Looking for advice to winterizing house, this will be my first time shutting down the place for the winter. I have a hot water heater and a natural gas furnace with base boards. So far I understand that I need to do the following.
1. Shut off the main water
2. Drain all of the toilets
3. Open all the faucets
4. Pour antifreeze in all the traps
5. Drain the hot water heater.
7. Drain the baseboards.?

Should I also shut down the gas? or should I let polit burn all winter? My fear is that if the polit goes out will the place fill up with gas?

Thx
xmytruck
post #2 of 21
I am heading down Cape tomorrow to do that exact thing. I have all electric though. I'd call your gas company and ask them that question. Everything else you wrote looks good to me. You may even consider shutting water off at street. I have not done that but it is a 30 dollar charge to turn on in spring in my town and it does make some people sleep better during winter months. Paul
post #3 of 21
shut off the gas supply to anything you are draining.

you better have some way to blow out the baseboard system and make sure you also drain the boiler.
post #4 of 21
In the future you can you can put a glycol/ water mix in the boiler and skip the draining. Glycol does decrease efficiency alittle. Blow down the H and C from the top floor, there may be residual water in the pipes. After you shut the boiler water feed ,attach air to the drains near the circulators and blow out the heating loops one at a time through the boiler drain. If there are flow check valves on the supply side blow the air into the boiler drain . If you have zone valves open them manually. Sometimes refridgerators,instant hots, and dishwashers are subject to freezing and being damaged.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheech View Post

In the future you can you can put a glycol/ water mix in the boiler and skip the draining. Glycol does decrease efficiency alittle. Blow down the H and C from the top floor, there may be residual water in the pipes. After you shut the boiler water feed ,attach air to the drains near the circulators and blow out the heating loops one at a time through the boiler drain. If there are flow check valves on the supply side blow the air into the boiler drain . If you have zone valves open them manually. Sometimes refridgerators,instant hots, and dishwashers are subject to freezing and being damaged.


How do I put glycol in boiler?
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by xmytruck View Post

How do I put glycol in boiler?

I was thinking of this to.  When I evacuated I drain the boiler and baseboard.  I figured I might save sometime if I have to evacuate again.  I am going to get a price from a plumber  when things calm down a little.  

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
I was talking to my buddy and he does not winterize his place at all, basally he shut the water at the main and puts the water heater on vacation mode and turns down the heat to 55. I thought this would be risky because if he loses power then pipes will freeze. I was shock when he told me that it would have to be in the low teens for 96 hours before the pipes would freeze on a house that has decent insulation. What you guys think of that?
post #8 of 21
You would have to have a plumber glycol your boiler, the heat loops have to be filled and air purged separately. If you have well water that system may need draining. Dont forget outside hose spigots. If you have city water contact your water department and ask about your water meter, pressure reducing valves etc. Toilets have huge internal traps that can freeze.There should be a drain near the water main to remove any water between the main and the first fixture. When you put the water back on give everything a GOOD long look. Toilet close couplings(gasket between the tank and bowl) can dry out, etc.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by xmytruck View Post

I was talking to my buddy and he does not winterize his place at all, basally he shut the water at the main and puts the water heater on vacation mode and turns down the heat to 55. I thought this would be risky because if he loses power then pipes will freeze. I was shock when he told me that it would have to be in the low teens for 96 hours before the pipes would freeze on a house that has decent insulation. What you guys think of that?

Depends on a lot of factors.......but I wouldn't bet the farm on it.
post #10 of 21
Your buddies plan works as well, but I would only consider it if someone could look in every week or so. If his heat is set on 55 his home should never freeze unless there is some insulation or draft issues, or exterior wall plumbing. He could drain down the HWH and close its gas valve and save some bucks.. Your right about the power going off. What I've also seen happen is the oil runs out, or the blind delivery stirs up the tank, clogs the filter, and its game over. A home is your biggest investment and water is sneaky, your best bet is to have a pro help you the first time.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheech View Post

Your buddies plan works as well, but I would only consider it if someone could look in every week or so. If his heat is set on 55 his home should never freeze unless there is some insulation or draft issues, or exterior wall plumbing. He could drain down the HWH and close its gas valve and save some bucks.. Your right about the power going off. What I've also seen happen is the oil runs out, or the blind delivery stirs up the tank, clogs the filter, and its game over. A home is your biggest investment and water is sneaky, your best bet is to have a pro help you the first time.

Yea he drives down once a month and checks out the place.. This year i think i am going to have a pro shut down the system I got an estimate for 250 bucks does that sound right?
post #12 of 21
Well, I think it's a fair price. Get a contract/ service agreement and his insurance certificate. If he is confident and upstanding he will gladly provide it.
post #13 of 21
if i was going to leave the house as your buddy does i would look into a temperature alarm system or a wifi thermostat if the house has a wireless network.
you could monitor house temperature and adjust it from anywhere you have internet.
post #14 of 21

Scuba bottle, first stage, and a modified whip. With a handful of fittings and hose clamps you should be able to figure something out.

post #15 of 21
We always use an air compressor and "the box" of assorted fittings to pressurize the water and blow everything clear. My father pressurizes it from the bottom as it is easily accesible and then opens and closes each faucet until they blow clear. I think pressurizing ot from the top floor is probably a better idea. Also remember that your compressor is high pressure, but low volume. This means it will not just blow everything clear if you run it witht he faucets open. You need to pressurize and purge the system many times to get all the water out. Also do not over pressurize. Domestic water systems are rated at bout 5psi. Your compressor should have no problem building 80+ psi.

The gas gets turned off at the bottles (we are on propane). No reason that I can see to leave a pilot burning all winter. Best case scenario is you burn some gas. Worst case scenario you blow up the house. I do not see any upside.

Sam
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