StripersOnline › SurfTalk › Stripers Online Forums › Kayaking and Kayak Fishing Forum › Kayak fishing, what is the best value kayak?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Kayak fishing, what is the best value kayak? - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander View Post

Speed and stability are mutually exclusive when it comes to kayaking. And that means answers to your question are as useful as knowing an average temperature across an hospital. It's you who can only make a verdict and there is nobody who could really help you doing that since all and any opinions are misleading. Trust nobody smile.gif

Agreed. I own 2 kayaks. I have a Tarpon 160 for speed and a Freedom Hawk 12 for stability. Its impossible for me to stand in the Tarpon but with the outriggers deployed I can stand, fish and paddle in my Freedom Hawk but it is slow in comparison. I was thinking of putting stabilizers on my Tarpon that could be raised when not in use. Has anyone here tried them out? Seems like the best of both worlds.

post #17 of 34
Just a small point: Speed and PRIMARY stability tend to be mutually exclusive. But you can have a kayak that is very stable in rough water (secondary stability) and is quite narrow/fast.
post #18 of 34
True, but that's only possible in sit-inside type of kayak where secondary stability is achieved without making it wide by lowering center of weight. Unfortunately sit-inside kayaks are not very suitable for fishing in open water. Sit-on-top kayak design makes it impossible to lower center of weight and the simplest way to keep it stable is to increase beam.
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander View Post

True, but that's only possible in sit-inside type of kayak where secondary stability is achieved without making it wide by lowering center of weight. Unfortunately sit-inside kayaks are not very suitable for fishing in open water. Sit-on-top kayak design makes it impossible to lower center of weight and the simplest way to keep it stable is to increase beam.

Wrong......there's plenty of SOT's out there with good secondary stability. Problem is, if they're one of the faster hulls, you're usually gonna have a wet butt.
post #20 of 34
I recommend going with a paddle boat first. Less of an initial investment and I think everyone should learn how to paddle first before they move on to peddles. Some never move on and many get out of the sport. Kayaking is not for everyone and it may not be for you.

To paraphrase what others have already said. Buy used and you will get the biggest bang for your buck. With patient you will find some great deals, especially at the end of the season.

Good luck in your search, J
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by clamboni View Post

Wrong......there's plenty of SOT's out there with good secondary stability. Problem is, if they're one of the faster hulls, you're usually gonna have a wet butt.

Yup. My Hurricane Phoenix (28" wide") was excellent in rough water (high secondary), and better than most on speed. Quite a dry ride too. My Stealth (26.5" wide) is even more stable, and faster than almost any other kayak, with a dry seat too, but the price was hull slap. My Kaskazi (24.5" wide) is quiet, has super speed, great secondary stability, but you sit deeper than the rest and the seat has no drain. It can be wet in there.

Here is the unstable Kaskazi.

http://s26.photobucket.com/albums/c118/simoneverett/Kayak%20videos/?action=view&current=Marlinhandling001_5.mp4
post #22 of 34
Best VALUE?

Take the purchase price, subtract the resale price, and divide the answer by the number of times you use it.

Buy used. Probably the easiest resale is the Ocean Kayak tandem "Malibu 2"

Downside? It is heavy, it is slow, it has no rudder.
It is a VERY stable platform however ....

Perhaps there should be some consideration as to the PLEASURE of the experience.
I mean, you save the most money, by simply not buying a kayak.
But if you're gonna buy, try to get one that fits your errrr.... butt.
The dent it leaves in your wallet won't last as long as the kayak will.

The only way to choose a kayak is ON THE WATER.

AMMO.
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kross57 View Post

My Kaskazi (24.5" wide) is quiet, has super speed, great secondary stability, but you sit deeper than the rest and the seat has no drain. It can be wet in there.
Here is the unstable Kaskazi.
http://s26.photobucket.com/albums/c118/simoneverett/Kayak%20videos/?action=view&current=Marlinhandling001_5.mp4

After the first wave over the side, its wet in there the rest of the day. You can try the scooch forward trick and that will get rid of a fair amount of water, but not all. I don't really mind the wet ride too much. When the water/air temps are warm, I'm in a swimsuit or angler pants. When it gets cold, I'm in a dry suit.

Stability is definitely a big plus with the Kaskazi. wink.gif
post #24 of 34
Wow Ross,...unless you only weigh about 50 lbs,..that's incredible!
post #25 of 34
No doubt with enough practice one could make tightrope walking LOOK STABLE. That doesn't change the fact that it's very unstable unless you learn how to compensate for its instability.
post #26 of 34
not exactly sure I would say that. lean one of the barges with all the primary stability over that far.......no matter how much balance you have you're going over. Look at it....the cockpit is almost in the water.
post #27 of 34
It always makes me wonder why someone's balancing skills are used for kayak "stability" demonstration. Please show me sitting in normal position and trying to lean like you're trying to catch line with fish on its end. And please do not use your paddle to help you not to overturn the kayak because in real life you'll be busy with rod and line and crazy fish. If you add a little waves to this I'll accept it as kayak stability demonstration.
post #28 of 34
You mean like this? That's a 27-inch wide Stealth kayak.

Trust me, if a kayak is properly made it can be narrow, fast and stable. I would rather be in one of my narrow boats than most standard fishing kayaks when it comes to handling rough conditions. No balancing required. It's funny that people who have never been in these kayaks are experts on their stability level.

post #29 of 34
How that picture contradicts my point? I bet that guy on a picture spent good amount of time in that kayak before he started to feel comfortable. And that's called skill. Let novice try to do the same and he'll be in the water in a blink of eye.
post #30 of 34
Yeah, I'm sure he caught a bunch of marlin just for practice. biggrin.gif

A guy like this uses these kayaks because they are an excellent tool for the job, not as a stunt. Like I said, it's funny how someone who has never tried one, or probably even seen one, knows all about these boats.

Here's some more shots. I guess they are all "practicing" too. kooky.gif
Some folks just can't admit they are wrong.wink.gif




New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
StripersOnline › SurfTalk › Stripers Online Forums › Kayaking and Kayak Fishing Forum › Kayak fishing, what is the best value kayak?