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Andrew Zimmern, Roasted Tuna Head

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I tripped over the last few minutes of a Bizarre Foods episode set in Japan. A tuna guru had slow-roasted the head of a tuna, looked to be a 100 lb fish, for four hours.
When presented at table, the head was easily pulled apart.

Did anybody catch any other details of how the tuna head was prepared?
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 
Google is a wonder. Can't post a link, but a search of "roast tuna head" turned up a food site with a post by someone who'd gotten some instruction from Andrew Zimmern.
Now all I need is a tuna head.
post #3 of 9
Never had tuna head, but tuna collar is awesome, tey grill it up at japanese "izakaya" pub restaurants
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Years ago the collar of the yellowtail, grilled, was a common thing at sushi restaurants, as "hamachi kama." Nowadays I don't see it often. I'm sure collars from tuna or salmon would be excellent too, and I wouldn't blink at all at trying a collar from tilefish, cod, striper either.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianBM View Post

Years ago the collar of the yellowtail, grilled, was a common thing at sushi restaurants, as "hamachi kama." Nowadays I don't see it often. I'm sure collars from tuna or salmon would be excellent too, and I wouldn't blink at all at trying a collar from tilefish, cod, striper either.

can you get good hamachi on the east coast? I thought it was a pacific ocean fish. over there, if you can get amberjack (kampachi), its collars are pretty damned good, too.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianBM View Post

Years ago the collar of the yellowtail, grilled, was a common thing at sushi restaurants, as "hamachi kama." Nowadays I don't see it often. I'm sure collars from tuna or salmon would be excellent too, and I wouldn't blink at all at trying a collar from tilefish, cod, striper either.

i've had salmon collars both roasted and hot smoked. SOOO f'ing GOOD.
post #7 of 9
Closer to the bone, the better the flavor. If you ever get a chance, get your hands on the bones of a bluefin tuna, scrape the meat off of the bones and eat it like sashimi. If you don't like raw fish, lightly salt the bones and grill them. Scrape the meat off and you will not be disappointed.

Don't restrict yourself to just the collars - grill up the whole head and pick the meat off. Obviously the larger the fish, the easier it will be to pick out the meaty parts.
post #8 of 9

I live in the USA When living in Alaska Tuna head was the family gathering food. The spices used can be almost any fish friendly herb or spice. ...If in a pinch use old bay, I like to toss it in sifted flour with a bit of lemon juice, and spices. The key in cooking, is the slow process. about 325 to 350 degrees for four to four and a half hours. The meat will fall off the bones, and unlike any other meat, you will have a variety of flavors(about 8 different wonderful flavors of meat). Enjoy :)

post #9 of 9
Being of Norwegian decent I always simmered the Cod heads and picked the meat off and made a fish stew. I'm sure roasting it would have been a real treat. Going to have to rememember this.
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