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Bone-in Roast Pork

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have a roast pork for the weekend. Any body ever rest a roast btwn during the cooking process?

Garlic and Herb Pork Loin Roast

This recipe calls for a bone-in pork loin roast, sometimes referred to as a pork sirloin roast. You could use the garlic-herb rub, borrowed from the terrific Complete Meat Cookbook, on a boneless roast but you would need to adjust the times below as the presence of the bone dramatically alters the cooking time.

The bone-in pork loin is an inexpensive yet delicious roast but can be rather tricky to roast properly. The problem has to do with getting the inner part of the roast next to the bone, to cook through without overcooking the outer part of the roast. The bone will, at first, impede the cooking of the interior of the roast until the bone becomes heated through. At that point the heated bone will continue to cook the meat adjacent to it even if the roast has been removed from the oven. Using this little bit of science (learned from Cook's Illustrated) one can roast this particular cut of meat to perfection.
5-6 pound bone-in Pork Loin Roast
6 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon salt
2 teaspoons dried sage
2 teaspoons dried rosemary
2 teaspoons black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil

Mash the garlic and salt together using a mortar and pestle until a paste is formed. Add the herbs, pepper and olive oil and continue to mash until well combined. Rub the roast all over with the garlic-herb paste and return to the fridge and allow to marinade up to 24 hours until ready to roast.

Preheat the oven to 475 degrees.

Put the roast, fat side up, onto a cake rack placed in a shallow roasting pan. Place the roast in the center of the oven and cook for 35 minutes. Remove the roast from the oven and allow to rest for 35 minutes. Meanwhile, reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees. During this time the internal temperature of the roast will rise up to 30 degrees as residual heat in the bone is conducted to the adjacent meat, allowing it to continue cooking from the inside out.

Return the roast to the cooler oven to finish cooking. This will take another hour to hour and fifteen minutes, or until the internal temperature of the roast reaches 145 degrees.

Remove the roast from the oven and allow to sit for 20 minutes before carving. At this point the internal temperature of the roast should be about 155 degrees.
post #2 of 16
The technique/theory/science seems reasonable. However, I gotta question choosing that cut to truly roast, as it turns out much better (in my opinion) to use it for braising. Braised pork comes out a different "animal" than a roast pork, but I think trying to roast a sirloin end may be doomed to failure. You are better off doing that with a bone in center cut roast.

The sirloin end is what I prefer for this:

http://www.stripersonline.com/t/630364/meat-and-poultry#post_5513514

Re-reading the recipe, I think perhaps they are using a wrong term for the cut, as they say a "bone-in loin" and then call it a sirloin, which really isn't correct. The sirloin end of the roast contains 3 different muscle groups (the back of the loin, the very back tip of the tenderloin, and part of the hip), whereas a center cut loin only has one, sometimes 2 (loin usually, and sometimes a section of the tenderloin).

Because the sirloin has 3 muscle groups, this leads to a lot of connective tissue which doesn't break down when roasting, making the roast stringy and tough.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Didn't see the need for the author of the recipe to add any confusion over naming cuts. Would this also work for prime rib? I wonder if letting roasts rest w/out the bones would stop or limit the heating/cooking process and lead to a more consistent result.

I see some recipe's that call for 155ºF internal temps on pork roasts and others that recommend 130º - 135ºF, plus resting to bring it up 5 more degrees before serving. I'll probably use the lower recommendation, but this will be my first pork roast of this type.
post #4 of 16
first thing I thought of when I read the title was BRINE
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reed422 View Post

first thing I thought of when I read the title was BRINE

Reed - that really depends on where the pork came from. Supermarkets that carry Swift and Hormel pork products, those are already "enhanced"....by us, Shaw's is one of those places. Stop and Shop pork products are not "enhanced" (or so I have been told), so in that case, yes, certainly it would benefit from a brine.

Paul - I would certainly recommend the lower temp, especially with a loin. At 155, it will already be dry and disappointing even before resting.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_M View Post

Would this also work for prime rib? I wonder if letting roasts rest w/out the bones would stop or limit the heating/cooking process and lead to a more consistent result.


I have made beef roasts by cooking it very low and slow until it hits temp and then letting it rest for up to 2 hours. This allows the carry over heat to fihish it up and juices to redistribute. Then it goes back in at 500 for 5-10 minutes to brown and crisp it up. It needs no additional rest before carving it, straight to the table. Done it with boneless and bone in roasts. Meat will be consistently cooked nearly edge to edge.

I don't know how much bones or no bones enters into this. Seems to be that the amount of carry over of the roast is dependent on the mass and I don't think whether it's some bone mass or not matters as much as how much mass.

So with high heat then low heat I dunno what you get exactly but rest in between should work similarly.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimW View Post

I don't know how much bones or no bones enters into this. Seems to be that the amount of carry over of the roast is dependent on the mass and I don't think whether it's some bone mass or not matters as much as how much mass.

This is an interesting question, which I don't know the answer to, but will try to find out. My thinking is that first, bones most likely have a different heat capacity than muscle.....whether it is lower or higher, I don't know.

Second, there is also the question of the cut of meat and where the bones are located......on a pork loin, rack of lamb, or rib roast (all rib cuts), the bones are pretty exterior to the meat on one side, where as something like a leg of lamb, beef shank, Boston Butt, chuck roast, or a ham, the bone is interior. Am sure that would also come into play.
post #8 of 16
Some quick research.....on the above question I posed.

See this link and look under #13. (It wouldn't let me copy the text here):

http://books.google.com/books?id=o7FVrP-WezMC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=heat+capacity+of+meat+bones&source=bl&ots=Jy6iswulzo&sig=VTcpr-vr4dMgbON3PYiBAUOBNX4&hl=en&ei=BYTjTvGkGufW0QHoxIH1BQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&sqi=2&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=heat%20capacity%20of%20meat%20bones&f=false

As to heat capacity, meats such as pork and beef are on the order of 2.5-3.0 KJ/Kg C......bone is .44.....so meat is gonna hold heat longer than bone (but also take longer to heat up). Bone will conduct heat faster than meat, so at resting, a bone in roast will have heat wicked away from the meat via the bone faster than if there was no bone in it, so I am guessing the carry over temp rise will be less with a bone in roast than a boneless one., but as the link states, it will also cook faster in the oven than a boneless roast, as the bone will transfer heat into the meat from the ambient oven temp faster than the flesh will (assuming the bone is exposed like on a rib roast).
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks Steve. It was a 6lb, 6 rib roast from a Berkshire pig, had lots of fat, and cooked up really nicely. I did an "on and off" separating the meat off the bones and tying back on w string. I just went w s/p forgoing the olive oil, garlic slivers and herbs generally recommended in most recipes. The oven has a temp probe which is adjusted for resting so it reads out a "carving" temp. I set it to 135ºF and ran the oven at 375ºF. Recipes called for anywhere from 325ºF to 500ºF so I choose a happy medium, guessing roughly 15min/lb. Pulled it, let it rest for 15mins and it was rosy in the interior and very juicy. The fat cap was golden brown and crunchy. I will try 130ºF next time. I liked it but not much comment from family and guests. It was accompanied by a shallot/tarragon cream sauce, again a very nice sauce, but no raves.

I also made German red cabbage which came out very well, scalloped potatoes, and steamed broccoli.

I started the cabbage early so it simmered for nearly 3 hours and it was perfect. It needs way more salt and ground pepper than indicated.

German Red Cabbage
Ingredients

1 medium head red cabbage, cored and sliced
2 large tart apples, peeled and sliced
1 medium sweet onion, sliced and separated into rings
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon salt
6 whole peppercorns
2 whole allspice
2 whole cloves
1 bay leaf
2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 teaspoons cold water

Directions

In a Dutch oven, toss cabbage, apples and onion. Add water, vinegar, sugar, butter and salt. Place the peppercorns, allspice, cloves and bay leaf on a double thickness of cheesecloth; bring up corners of cloth and stir with kitchen string to form a bag. Add to Dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1-1/4 hours.
Discard spice bag. In a small bowl, combine cornstarch and cold water until smooth; stir in cabbage mixture. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1-2 minutes or until thickened.
post #10 of 16
Paul - sounds like ya did good...icon14.gifsmile.gif

Having a REAL pig helps a lot instead of that "other white meat" that has been bred to be um, "healthy" cwm13.gif.....wink.gif
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Agree about the breeds. The guy I bought a couple turkeys from this fall has indicated he'll have 20% of his flock, ~50 Standard Bronze next year vs the Broad Breasted Bronze he raised this year. While the BBB were fine turkeys they didn't taste appreciably different than the common industrial breed the Broad Breasted White.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_M View Post

Agree about the breeds. The guy I bought a couple turkeys from this fall has indicated he'll have 20% of his flock, ~50 Standard Bronze next year vs the Broad Breasted Bronze he raised this year. While the BBB were fine turkeys they didn't taste appreciably different than the common industrial breed the Broad Breasted White.

Kind of a nature vs nurture thing. We ate some great broad breasted white turkeys and yorkshire piggies raised locally years ago. Not such great heritage piggies raised on good stuff are remarkably different than commercial pork too.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Until you've had one of these older breeds of turkey one can't appreciate the flavor potential.
post #14 of 16
I usually sear my roasts before throwing them in the oven. Would that have any impact on this resting technique?
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by stryperStalker View Post

I usually sear my roasts before throwing them in the oven. Would that have any impact on this resting technique?

IMO, searing is only to from the flavorful crust and not have anything to do with keeping moisture in.


The 30 minutes at 475 should be more than enough to accomplish flavor and texture-wise as would searing.



In fact, the fat layer at the surface would come out better with a 100% roasting process and no searing. IMO.
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