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What does factory blem mean?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I saw a rod for sale in the BST that says it's a factory blem. What does that mean? A blemish, is that a mark on the rod or that it has a possible weakness some where along the rod? How do you know what the blemish is?

I'm not interested in the rod but it started me wondering.

 

post #2 of 13
Blems could mean either. With blems you really need to give them a thorough inspection for straightness and possible structural problems which are visible under close inspection. Cosmetic blems are really not a problem.
post #3 of 13
A blem is a blank that did not meet the manufacturers quality control standards, and it could be from a variety of things. A close going over is a good idea as Al has said.

If it's purely cosmetic you can get a great blank for cheap $$$, although if it's a novice just getting their feet wet i would advise against building on a blem, until it is known for certain why it is labled as such.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

OK, blem could mean either a discolor issue for a physical defect in the rod.

 

Would it be for a blank only or could it be a factory built rod?

 

I saw a factory built rod once that was tagged as a blem but I figured it had to be an issue other than a physical defect or they would never have sold it. Am I wrong in that thought ?

post #5 of 13
As Al said it could vary. I bought a few blems years ago, i was just globbed up finish at the top few inches of the blank. I was trimming them anyway, been using them for years.
post #6 of 13
Noi factory is going to sell a known blank or rod with a defect.. Don't get blem and defect mixed up. A blem might be a blank with more of a curve then is allowed or finish problem!!
post #7 of 13
I love factory blemishes -- love 'em -- especially if I can get multiple quanities of them. I love them because they usually work about as well as firsts, and you can usually get them for peanuts. If you buy five or ten blanks for $5 apiece, who cares if one or two of them is a dud, or breaks?

I don't know that I would use a blem for a rod that was important to me (or someone else): a go-to surf rod, for example. But they are a marvelously fun way to screw around and experiment, stuff that you'd never do to a blank that cost $100 or more. And they can make very, very effective rods -- think of a blem as a good blank to build a rod for your mother-in-law on.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belmo View Post

I love factory blemishes -- love 'em -- especially if I can get multiple quanities of them. I love them because they usually work about as well as firsts, and you can usually get them for peanuts. If you buy five or ten blanks for $5 apiece, who cares if one or two of them is a dud, or breaks?
I don't know that I would use a blem for a rod that was important to me (or someone else): a go-to surf rod, for example. But they are a marvelously fun way to screw around and experiment, stuff that you'd never do to a blank that cost $100 or more. And they can make very, very effective rods -- think of a blem as a good blank to build a rod for your mother-in-law on.



Depends how vicious and violent your mother in law is, building her a new rod on a blem is more than likely going to equip her with a weapon that she'll end up beating you half to death with. Have you seen that new show Monster in laws:scared:cwm31.gif
post #9 of 13
REad Belmo's post carefully...."I don't know that I would use a blem for a rod that was important to me" > that means do not spend hours on grip inlays or wraps or put expensive components on it. Also dont' be a scumbag and sell it as a first quality blank, this reason is why most factories started destroying blems.

I've had similar luck to Belmo when I first startede I built on a few blems, learned a lot about the blanks at a cheap price. I did have one blow up for no reason at all, but have others which are just fine.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

This was a few years ago. I was at a refinery along the Delaware River, went to lunch off site. I saw this bait & tackle in the shopping center I was in. I went in and saw a Lami XS-101-MS for $79.00, I saw "blem' on the tag. I looked it over, it looked fine to me but I knew nothing. I got it for a little less than what the tag asked for. It is 10', rated for 2 - 5 oz. I was always leary of really putting the boots to the rod, you know wondering what the blem was.

Last fall I got into a situation that had bunker over the bar with decent bass on them and I knew the 9' rod I had with me wasn't gonna do it. I had a VS 200 with 40lb PP on the rod, put the snagging rig on and went to work. One cast, one 20lb bass, next cast same thing. The rod performed to perfection and has continued to do so ever since. I have no idea what the blemish is but this rod is a workhorse. It tosses 2 oz very well; on the past times I was on the beach when the bass were over the bar this rod got the metal and teaser into their area of interest. It throws 3 oz very well also.

I'm looking forward to continued success using this stick and I don't hesitate with it any longer.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIEF500 View Post

This was a few years ago. I was at a refinery along the Delaware River, went to lunch off site. I saw this bait & tackle in the shopping center I was in. I went in and saw a Lami XS-101-MS for $79.00, I saw "blem' on the tag. I looked it over, it looked fine to me but I knew nothing. I got it for a little less than what the tag asked for. It is 10', rated for 2 - 5 oz. I was always leary of really putting the boots to the rod, you know wondering what the blem was.
Last fall I got into a situation that had bunker over the bar with decent bass on them and I knew the 9' rod I had with me wasn't gonna do it. I had a VS 200 with 40lb PP on the rod, put the snagging rig on and went to work. One cast, one 20lb bass, next cast same thing. The rod performed to perfection and has continued to do so ever since. I have no idea what the blemish is but this rod is a workhorse. It tosses 2 oz very well; on the past times I was on the beach when the bass were over the bar this rod got the metal and teaser into their area of interest. It throws 3 oz very well also.
I'm looking forward to continued success using this stick and I don't hesitate with it any longer.

I think it comes down to " are you willing to take a chance" you did and won, so far. IMO if that blank had a structural defect it would of shown itself already, especially after handling all those fish.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnnashman View Post

I think it comes down to " are you willing to take a chance" you did and won, so far. IMO if that blank had a structural defect it would of shown itself already, especially after handling all those fish.

I have a few rules with blemished / second-string blanks.

The first is never to spend much money on one, because, like that pinhead Forrest Gump's box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get. If you don't spend much, then you don't have much to lose. This is also why, like Billy said, you don't put gold cermet guides on one of these.

The second rule is not to have expectations that are too high; or, to put the same thing another way, don't be too disappointed if your rod breaks (this is also why blems are really only worth buying if you can get them very cheap). A rod or blank is a blemish for a reason, and if it snaps on you, ya gotta be able to shrug it off, and put the broken pieces to use, like making tapered reamers, handle extensions, or whatever.

The last thing is that as soon as I get one, I put it through a torture test: I do a lot of test casts (including overloading the blank slightly), hang a healthy weight from the rod tip, wiggle it like Jerry Sandusky, etc. I do this with all blanks, pretty much, but I do it more so if I'm not sure whether a blank is sound or not. If the blank survives my initial testing, then it's probably going to survive being fished. You obviously can't do as much with a factory rod, especially in a tackle shop, but I would bend/cast it as much as I could before I bought it.

And then, if you make it this far, just go out and fish it. If it hasn't broken yet, then it's probably a blemish for cosmetic reasons, and will fish just fine. At this point, Chief, you can fish the rod as though you paid full retail for a first-stringer - it's probably just as good as one, especially after you've been around the block with it a few times.
post #13 of 13
I was raised in Foley Alabama; home of 'Lew' Childre's Fishing Rods.

I lived in their 'Blem Barrel' where you could buy finished rods for $5 each.

I bought some that have been around for many years/many fish. I haven't seen/found the 'blem' yet smile.gif

For Belmo: My late Mother-in-Law had her own fishing rods and probably could use one for a weapon. I just maintained good relations(took her fishing) to keep peace in the family. C2
Edited by Charlie2 - 11/28/11 at 2:11pm
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