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Fillet knife to carve thanksgiving turkey?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I go to the same place ever year for Thanksgiving and my uncle ALWAYS complains his knives aren't sharp enough and how it would be so much easier (personally the turkey is so good he could cut it with a spoon and I wouldn't care). Being that I want to "help out" a little more this year (other than eating, cracking jokes and drinking pumpkin beer). I was contemplating bringing my Dexter non stainless fillet knives over for him to try or even just buy him one. Any thoughts? If this is a "dumb" idea (sorry I don't cook much if i do it's fish) any recommendations for a good knife?
post #2 of 15
One mistake that people make when carving turkey (or even a roast chicken) is to carve it the "traditional" way like is shown in the classic picture by that artist who's name is giving me a brain fart......

But the below shows the 'traditional way"...........

234

Much better is to remove the entire side of the breast from the carcass of the bird in one large piece, and slice it across..........this not only gives a pieces of skin with every breast slice, but it also makes the texture of the slices much more palatable. And some folks think that the best knife to cut the removed breast half with is, believe it or not, either a serrated knife, or better yet an electric knife. Either of those will tear the skin much less, leaving it intact on each slice you make.

See the last part of this video:

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-carve-a-turkey
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
So get the serrated dexter knife =P

Thanks Steve, Thanksgiving is my FAVORITE holiday (i didn't have it when i worked for the geek squad as I worked black friday)
post #4 of 15
I thought that an electric knife was just old school until i actually used it to carve - very impressed with results. And I have used DR filet knife in the past which works fine, but can be on the short side.
post #5 of 15
I've done methods of carving turkeys. If you're doing the method pictured it helps to remove the wishbone before cooking. I use a good boning knife and a meat slicer no matter which method I use.
post #6 of 15
Filleting off the breast and then slicing cross-grain works great if most of the turkey will be consumed at the first meal. However, our family loves turkey leftovers so we most always get a big Tom. I believe the leftover breast meat dries out faster when it is sliced cross-grain.
post #7 of 15
When I was in high school I worked in a deli-restaurant and one of my jobs was carving about 1 dozen turkeys a week.

I started by carefully cutting off the wings and legs. Then I removed the breasts and sliced them. I put the legs and wings on a large platter, then I placed all the sliced breast meat in the middle.
I would then fill in the spaces with all the rest of the meat. Some lettuce went around the edges and sliced cranberry went on top. I always used a sharp filet knife, anything else is a waste of time.
This took all of about 5 minutes.


It looked like a work of art. smile.gif
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedracer View Post

When I was in high school I worked in a deli-restaurant and one of my jobs was carving about 1 dozen turkeys a week.
I started by carefully cutting off the wings and legs. Then I removed the breasts and sliced them. I put the legs and wings on a large platter, then I placed all the sliced breast meat in the middle.
I would then fill in the spaces with all the rest of the meat. Some lettuce went around the edges and sliced cranberry went on top. I always used a sharp filet knife, anything else is a waste of time.
This took all of about 5 minutes.
It looked like a work of art. smile.gif

I bet you did this in the comfort of an air conditioned room. Well whoopty-fookin-do! You have no right to tell us how to do this unless you do it in a hot kitchen like the rest of us. Jackass!
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravioli View Post

I bet you did this in the comfort of an air conditioned room. Well whoopty-fookin-do! You have no right to tell us how to do this unless you do it in a hot kitchen like the rest of us. Jackass!

You just wait until SIM comes back, mister!!!!! mad.gif
post #10 of 15

SIM,

 

That video was very offensive - almost pornagraphic. And what does a Brit know about carving a Thanksgiving turkey?

turkey.jpg

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Tj View Post

SIM,

And what does a Brit know about carving a Thanksgiving turkey?

Evidently more than 90% of Americans..............wink.gif
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plug View Post

Filleting off the breast and then slicing cross-grain works great if most of the turkey will be consumed at the first meal. However, our family loves turkey leftovers so we most always get a big Tom. I believe the leftover breast meat dries out faster when it is sliced cross-grain.

So just carve one side the "Steve" way (actually something I agree with him on), and then do the other side traditional?

Just a thought.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinny View Post

So just carve one side the "Steve" way (actually something I agree with him on), and then do the other side traditional?
Just a thought.

You get good ideas working in a deli!
post #14 of 15
Great tip on th turkey carving from SIM, my family gets tired of me always letting them know what SIM thinks about stuff. Sorry, I gave you a bad name in my house, my kids hate you, and my wife just rolls her eyes when I bring another SIM suggestion.
post #15 of 15
even the best knife is a dangerous, useless tool if not cared for and kept sharp. don't buy him a new knife, spend the $40 on a double-sided natural arkansas stone and make him learn how to use it - even a $2 carving knife from walmart will hold an edge long enough to properly and cleanly carve a turkey.
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